Olympic Village Sex Fest: Athletes Tell All In ESPN Report That Reveals 70,000 Condoms Just Isn’t Enough


Surprisingly enough, some people really have their panties in a twist about the extreme debauchery going on between athletes at the Olympic games.  When it really shouldn’t be surprising considering the Greco-Roman history the games were born of, in a time when over the top hedonism was a favorite pass time of the ruling elite during ancient times. On an occultist level, the wild scenes described in the ESPN story below make perfect sense.

Especially this year with the games being held in London, psychic vampirism will undoubtedly be at an all time high as parasitic aetheric entities are waiting to feast from all the misplaced sexual energy surrounding filling the air. And lets not forget the side-dishes of subsequent guilt, shame and negative emotions are that always follow losing oneself in misogynist behavior,  whether it be from the victim or the perpetrator.

In addition to the athletes, what happens in public will be nothing compared to the sacrificial rituals going on behind the scenes amongst the ruling elite, Stanley Kubrick’s film “Eyes Wide Shut” comes to mind as a point of reference for what’s to be expected behind closed doors at the London 2012 Olympics.  How creepy can things get…eww, better not ask!

The Huffington Post  | Posted: 07/13/2012

Seventy thousand condoms would be enough for the entire city of Boynton Beach, Fla., but at the Olympic Village, that amount won’t suffice.

Why, might you ask? Because the Olympic Village is one big sex fest.

Athletes told ESPN’s Sam Alipour all the sexy details about life at the Olympic Village — a city within the hosting city consisting of houses, cafes, and even clubs — for the magazine’s 2012 “Body Issue.”.

In the report, the ESPN writer revealed some rather scandalous facts, including that 100,000 condoms are ordered for the Games. Apparently officials at the 2000 Sydney Games had to put in an order for 20,000 extra condoms after the initial 70,000 ran out. Since then, an order of 100,000 has become the norm.

Even Hope Solo, a soccer star and Olympic gold-medalist, copped to the raucous nights, when sex comes as either a celebratory act or a “consolation prize.”

“I’ve seen people having sex right out in the open. On the grass, between buildings, people are getting down and dirty,” Solo told ESPN The Magazine.

Nevertheless, this is not the first time athletes have openly discussed the “sex fest” that is the Olympics.

In 2008, former Olympian Matthew Syed wrote a piece for the Times of London about how the Olympics and intercourse go hand-in-hand.

“Olympic athletes have to display an unnatural … level of self-discipline in the build-up to big competitions. How else is this going to manifest itself than with a volcanic release of pent-up hedonism?” Syed wrote, according to the New York Post, which cited the Times of London report.

John Godina, an Olympic shot putter, recently told ABC News that athletes are at the Games to work hard, but that they’re willing to play a little, too.

“Athletes go there focused and once their job is done, they have fun,” Godina told ABC. “They don’t necessarily go there looking for it, but things happen … you learn not to ask a lot of questions.”

The Olympics begins Friday, July 27, and ends Sunday, Aug. 12.

Will you still medal in the morning?

Jul 14 9:56 | By Sam AlipourESPN The Magazine
Victory Park in London's Olympic VillageOlivia Harris/Getty ImagesThe village will be protected by electric fences and 24/7 surveillance cameras.

This story appears in ESPN The Magazine’s July 23, 2012 Body Issue. Subscribe today!

AMERICAN TARGET SHOOTER Josh Lakatos faced a conundrum. Halfway through the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney, he and his rifle-toting teammates were finished with their events, and the U.S. Olympic Committee and team officials had ordered them to turn in the keys to their three-story house and head back to the States. But Lakatos didn’t want to leave. He knew from his experience four years earlier in Atlanta, where he’d won silver, that the Olympic Village was just about to erupt into a raucous party, and there was no way he was going to miss it. So he asked the maid at the emptied-out dwelling if she’d kindly look the other way as he jimmied the lock. “I don’t care what you do,” she replied.

Within hours, word of the nearly vacant property had spread. Popping up once every two years, the Olympic Village is a boisterous city within a city: chock-full of condos, midrises and houses as well as cafés, barbershops, arcades, discos and TV lounges. The only thing missing is privacy — nearly everyone is stuck with a roommate. So while Lakatos claimed a first-floor suite for himself, the remaining rooms were there for the taking. The first to claim space that night were some Team USA track and field fellas.

“The next morning,” Lakatos says, “swear to God, the entire women’s 4×100 relay team of some Scandinavian-looking country walks out of the house, followed by boys from our side. And I’m just going, ‘Holy crap, we’d watched these girls run the night before.’”

And on it went for eight days as scores of Olympians, male and female, trickled into the shooter’s house — and that’s what everyone called it, Shooters’ House — at all hours, stopping by an Oakley duffel bag overflowing with condoms procured from the village’s helpful medical clinic. After a while, it dawned on Lakatos: “I’m running a friggin’ brothel in the Olympic Village! I’ve never witnessed so much debauchery in my entire life.”


TAKE YOUR MARK
Home to more than 10,000 athletes at the Summer Games and 2,700 at the Winter, the Olympic Village is one of the world’s most exclusive clubs. To join, prospective members need only have spectacular talent and — we long assumed — a chaste devotion to the most intense competition of their lives. But the image of a celibate Games began to flicker in ’92 when it was reported that the Games’ organizers had ordered in prophylactics like pizza. Then, at the 2000 Sydney Games, 70,000 condoms wasn’t enough, prompting a second order of 20,000 and a new standing order of 100,000 condoms per Olympics.

Many Olympians, past and present, abide by what Summer Sanders, a swimmer who won two gold medals, a silver and a bronze in Barcelona, calls the second Olympic motto: “What happens in the village stays in the village.” Yet if you ask enough active and retired athletes often enough to spill their secrets, the village gates will fly open. It quickly becomes clear that, summer or winter, the games go on long after the medal ceremony. “There’s a lot of sex going on,” says women’s soccer goalkeeper Hope Solo, a gold medalist in 2008. How much sex? “I’d say it’s 70 percent to 75 percent of Olympians,” offers world-record-holding swimmer Ryan Lochte, who will be in London for his third Games. “Hey, sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do.”


GET SET …
The games begin as soon as teams move in a week or so before opening ceremonies. “It’s like the first day of college,” says water polo captain Tony Azevedo, a veteran of Beijing, Athens and Sydney who is returning to London. “You’re nervous, super excited. Everyone’s meeting people and trying to hook up with someone.”

Which is perfectly understandable, if not to be expected. Olympians are young, supremely healthy people who’ve been training with the intensity of combat troops for years. Suddenly they’re released into a cocoon where prying reporters and overprotective parents aren’t allowed. Pre-competition testosterone is running high. Many Olympians are in tapering mode, full of excess energy because they’re maintaining a training diet of up to 9,000 calories per day while not actually training as hard. The village becomes “a pretty wild scene, the biggest melting pot you’ve been in,” says Eric Shanteau, an American who swam in Beijing and will be heading to London.
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One comment on “Olympic Village Sex Fest: Athletes Tell All In ESPN Report That Reveals 70,000 Condoms Just Isn’t Enough

  1. Pingback: Olympic Village Sex Fest: Athletes Tell All In ESPN Report That Reveals 70,000 Condoms Just Isn’t Enough «

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