The Middle Class Is Being Cooked Alive — Dave Kranzler

Published on Sep 26, 2015
Dave Kranzler from Investment Research Dynamics joins me to discuss his latest thoughts on the physical silver market, and ‘The Road’ of horrors that lay ahead for the American people. Horrors created by international Banksters like the Jacob Rothschild, who in 2007 – just a year before the great economic collapse of 2008 – paid $5 million pounds for a painting called ‘Boy Building a House of Cards’. Are you starting to get the picture?

For REAL News & Information 24/7:

Music: “Complex”
( Licensed under Creative Commons “Attribution 3.0”…

The content in my videos and on the SGTbull07 – channel are provided for informational purposes only. Use the information found in these videos as a starting point for conducting your own research and conduct your own due diligence BEFORE making any significant investing decisions. SGTbull07 – assumes all information to be truthful and reliable; however, I cannot and do not warrant or guarantee the accuracy of this information. Thank you.

FADE to BLACK Jimmy Church w/ Leo Zagami, the Vatican Illuminati

Link submitted by Karen, mahalo!

Leo Zagami joins us for the first time, live from Rome, Italy and we discuss the Pope’s visit to the US, the White House, Congress and the UN. We also cover his time with the Illuminati, Freemasons and his disclosure of secret societies. We also talk about Sept 23rd being the end of the world…this show was broadcast live on the 23rd.

WARNING: Global Economic Free Fall — Andy Hoffman ~

Published on Sep 27, 2015

Andy Hoffman from Miles Franklin is back to document the current state of the collapse of the global economy – and the situation is only getting worse by the day. From Caterpillar to Glencore Mining, the future is as clear as it is bleak. And most American still have absolutely NO IDEA what’s in store for them as the FED dominoes of fraud begin falling. TRILLIONS have been printed with no “trickle down” in sight. Meanwhile, there is plenty of paper silver and gold, and precious little PHYSICAL – even as the 1980 inflation adjusted all-time high for silver passes $600 per ounce. The sheeple sleep snug in their beds certain that today’s debt based paradigm will continue forever. They are in for a rude awakening.

For REAL News & Information 24/7:

Music: “Complex”
( Licensed under Creative Commons “Attribution 3.0”…

The content in my videos and on the SGTbull07 – channel are provided for informational purposes only. Use the information found in these videos as a starting point for conducting your own research and conduct your own due diligence BEFORE making any significant investing decisions. SGTbull07 – assumes all information to be truthful and reliable; however, I cannot and do not warrant or guarantee the accuracy of this information. Thank you.

INTERVIEW: World famous Renegade Military Historian, Douglas Duane Dietrich 9-15-15

An excellent interview with  Douglas Duane Dietrich and Laura Lee Solomon, covering military history throughout the world up to current day war and politics. Interview by Andrew Bartzis, Con-Cen.

Novel Photocatalytic Pervious Composites for Removing Multiple Classes of Toxins from Water

On family trips to India as a child, Deepika Kurup often saw kids like herself forced to drink dirty water — as a result, at age 14, this Mighty Girl became determined to find to a way to ensure that everyone has access to safe drinking water. For an 8th grade project, the Nashua, New Hampshire teen invented a water purification system that uses a photocatalytic composite and sunlight to clean water — an invention which earned her recognition as America’s Top Young Scientist in 2012. Three years later, the now 17-year-old scientist has spent several years improving her purification system and is currently one of the finalists for the 2015 Google Science Fair!

According to Deepika, access to clean water is a global crisis; “one-ninth of the global population lacks access to clean water,” she explains “and 500,000 children die every year because of water related diseases.” On the trips to India, her immigrant parents’ native land, Deepika saw the struggle for clean water first hand: “[My parents] would have to boil the water before we drank it. I also saw children on the streets of India… take these little plastic bottles and they’re forced to fill it up with the dirty water they see on the street. And they’re forced to drink that water, because they don’t have another choice. And then I go back to America and I can instantly get tap water.”

Her early investigations into water purification methods found that many of them were expensive and potentially hazardous. “Traditionally, to purify waste water, they use chlorine, and chlorine can create harmful byproducts,” she points out. “Also, you have to keep replenishing the chlorine, you have to keep putting chlorine into the waste water to purify it.” She wanted to invent a new way to clean water that would be both cheap and sustainable.

Deepika came up with the idea of using a photocatalyst — a substance that reacts with water’s impurities when energized by the sun — that also filters the water. The combination of the reaction and the filtration can remove most contaminants for a fraction of the cost of chlorine purification. She determined that her system reduces the presence of coliform bacteria by 98% immediately after filtration and by 100% within 15 minutes. Another advantage is that her catalyst is reusable: “a catalyst doesn’t get used up in the reaction,” she says. “Theoretically you can keep using my composite forever.”

Deepika’s efforts have already by widely recognized — in addition to being named America’s Top Young Scientist in the Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge, she was also the recipient of the 2013 President’s Environmental Youth Award and the 2014 U.S. Stockholm Junior Water Prize, and she was named one of Forbes Magazine’s 2015 “30 Under 30 in Energy.” She’s also excited to meet the other finalists at next week’s Google Science Fair’s Finalist Ceremony — even if it means missing a few days of classes at her new school, Harvard University, where she plans to study neurobiology. Most of all, she’s looking for forward to taking her research from the lab to real life: “It’s one thing to be working in a lab, doing this, and another thing to actually deploy it and see it working in the real world. So that’s one of my steps in the future.”

If you’d like to encourage your own Mighty Girl’s interest in science, we showcased our favorite science kits and toys in our blog post, “Science At Play: Top 20 Science Toys for Mighty Girls” at

For several stories to inspire your Mighty Girl’s spirit of discovery — all for ages 4 to 8 — check out “Rosie Revere, Engineer” (,”11 Experiments That Failed” (, and “I Wonder” (

To inspire children and teens with more stories of girls and women in science — both in fiction and real-life — visit our “Science & Technology” section at…/general-int…/science-technology

And, if your Mighty Girl loves to show off her love of science and technology, visit our STEM-themed t-shirt section at

Summary of Deepika’s research from Google Science Fair project page, learn more here:

The goal of my research was to develop a green, sustainable, and economically viable technique for water purification. My innovative methodology integrates filtration with an enhanced photocatalytic advanced oxidation process. I synthesized novel silver (Ag) doped photocatalytic pervious composites using uniformly graded sand, Portland cement, titanium dioxide (TiO2) and silver nitrate (AgNO3). The ratio of TiO2: cement: sand was 1: 5: 20 by weight. The optimum amount of Ag was 0.04% by weight of the composite. This composition was determined from photodegradation studies of the organic indicator dye methylene blue, using UV-Vis spectroscopy. The photodegradation of methylene blue conformed to pseudo-first order kinetics according to the Langmuir–Hinshelwood model. Bacterial inactivation studies with the Ag-doped photocatalytic pervious composite showed 98% reduction in total coliform bacteria immediately after filtration. Subsequent exposure of the filtered water to sunlight inside a beaker containing an Ag-doped photocatalytic composite disc resulted in 100% inactivation of total coliform bacteria in just 15 minutes. In the future I will focus on studying the feasibility of removing different types of pathogens, organics, pesticides, and heavy metals. Safety, durability and long-term performance will also be investigated in detail before the filter is deployed in the real-world. My project opens numerous possibilities for safe, cost-effective, and eco-friendly water purification.

Death in the air: American Airlines pilot dies mid-flight with 152 on board

© Carlos Garcia Rawlins
The captain of an American Airlines flight died while piloting his plane, which was carrying 147 passengers and 5 crew members from Phoenix to Boston, the airline has confirmed. The cause of death is still unknown, except that it was due to an “illness.”

“Syracuse, American 550, medical emergency, captain is incapacitated, request handling for runway,” the co-pilot is heard saying on an audio recording posted on, which provides only a glimpse into the dramatic events that transpired in the plane’s cockpit on Monday.

The Airbus A320’s first officer was recorded talking to the control tower in Syracuse, New York, where Flight 550 requested an emergency landing.

READ MORE: ‘Pilot uneasy’: Autistic child kicked off US flight with emergency landing

As the recording continues, the officer says he is concerned with how quickly the medics could get on board. The airport control tower directed him to a gate where medics were waiting.

An airline official was only able to reveal that the death was caused by an “illness” and occurred about four hours into the flight. Unconfirmed reports suggest that a flight attendant, who happened to be a former nurse, attempted to provide first aid to the captain but to no avail.

Passengers reportedly understood that something was going terribly wrong when a “quivering” female voice alerted them that the pilot was sick via the intercom, passenger Peter McSwiggin told WCVB.

Flight 550 then made a rapid descent, arriving in Syracuse at 7:13 am ET, according to American Airlines’ website.

The co-pilot was forced to make the unplanned landing on his own.

The Guardian quoted another passenger named Louise Anderson as saying that she awoke to the announcement that there was going to be an emergency landing due to pilot illness. Anderson said rumors of the captain’s death began circulating after landing, but an official announcement was made only on their makeup flight.

“Unfortunately, our pilot passed away. We are incredibly saddened by this event, and we are focused on caring for our pilot’s family and colleagues,” the outlet quoted an American Airlines spokesperson as saying.

READ MORE: ‘Bang, flames, lights went out’: Cathay Pacific jet diverted to Bali with one engine out

A spokeswoman for the airline, Andrea Huguely, confirmed that a replacement crew had been dispatched to Syracuse and the flight was able to arrive at its destination. According to standard procedure, pilots over 40 are required to go through two physicals each year.

The incident, while rare, was not unique: according to the Federal Aviation Administration, a total of eight pilots, including the unnamed 57-year-old American Airlines captain, have died during commercial flights since 1994.

Ed. Note: IMO there’s more to this story than meets the eye, last year RadChick and Leuren Moret reported on The Wigner Effect. Radiation from Fukushima is creating a variety of aviation anomalies which include pilot’s dying in flight due to radiation exposure and health problems for both flight attendants and pilots. More here:

Study: Circumcision Permanently Alters the Brain, Researchers Threatened

After discovering that the trauma from circumcision permanently altered the baby’s brain in regions associated with reasoning, perception and emotions, the researchers were threatened to destroy their results or face legal action and immediate dismissal.


As a graduate student working in the Department of Epidemiology at Kingston General Hospital, Paul D. Tinari, Ph.D. was approached by a group of nurses who had noticed that babies that underwent circumcision were experiencing excruciating levels of pain that negatively affected their behavior.   In an attempt to gather some scientific evidence that would support their positions,  Tinari suggested functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and/or Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scanning to observe the effects of circumcision on the infant brain.

Tinari and the nurses used the MRI machine for their study after the MRI machine operator granted them permission.  Next they needed a test subject whose brain they could scan for changes pre and post circumcision.  A pregnant nurse volunteered her son to be the subject of the study.  Her husband had been putting intense pressure on her to have the procedure done, and it was her hope that the information gathered from the study would lead to the complete eradication of male infant circumcision.

What did the MRI Brain Scans Reveal?

The researchers tightly strapped the infant to the traditional plastic “circumstraint”, and immobilized the infants head using the standard surgical tape.  With no anesthetic used, the entire contraption was put into the MRI chamber, and the doctor performed the surgery using a sterilized plastic blade (since no metal objects can be used in an MRI due to large magnetic fields).

Paul D. Tinari, Ph.D. explains the results of his study:

The baby was kept in the machine for several minutes to generate baseline data of the normal metabolic activity in the brain. This was used to compare to the data gathered during and after the surgery. Analysis of the MRI data indicated that the surgery subjected the infant to significant trauma. The greatest changes occurred in the limbic system concentrating in the amygdala and in the frontal and temporal lobes.A neurologist who saw the results postulated that the data indicated that circumcision affected most intensely the portions of the victim’s brain associated with reasoning, perception and emotions. Follow up tests on the infant one day, one week and one month after the surgery indicated that the child’s brain never returned to its baseline configuration. In other words, the evidence generated by this research indicated that the brain of the circumcised infant was permanently changed by the surgery.

Researchers Threatened and Forced to Destroy Study Results

“Our problems began when we attempted to publish our findings in the open medical literature,” explained Paul Tinari.  All of the researchers who participated in the study were called before the discipline committee at Kingston General Hospital who severely reprimanded them, stating that male circumcision was legal under all circumstances in Canada, and that studying the adverse effects of circumcision was strictly prohibited.  The research team wasn’t allowed to publish the results of their study, and what’s more, they were forced to destroy all of their results.  The penalty that would be imposed upon them if they failed to comply was immediate dismissal and legal action.

As Paul D. Tinari, current director of the Pacific Institute for Advanced Study has written,

I would encourage anyone with access to fMRI and /or PET scanning machines to repeat our research as described above, confirm our results, and then publish the results in the open literature.


Resources Used:

The Corbett Report – The Trans-Pacific Partnership Negotiations Are Finished: Here’s What You Need to Know

Image converted using ifftoany

by James Corbett
October 6, 2015

Last-minute negotiations over the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) deal in Atlanta this past week finally ended on Monday when trade ministers emerged with a deal. It’s a testament to the secrecy and apathy that has surrounded the entire TPP process that most people didn’t even know these negotiations were taking place, let alone that a deal was near. Nevertheless, the completed deal is now on its way to member countries for ratification.

So what is the deal? Who is behind it? Why are so many opposed to it? And what’s next? Here’s a primer on what you need to know as the TPP deal enters the home stretch.

What is it?

tppgraphThe TPP is a so-called “free trade agreement” that is the largest such deal since NAFTA. If ratified it will cover 12 countries, impacting over 400 million people and nearly 40% of the world’s GDP. Member nations of the TPP negotiations include Australia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, the United States and Vietnam.

What does it do?

We do know that the TPP agreement is a 30 chapter document dealing with everything from agricultural tariffs to intellectual property to wildlife conservation to customs and financial services. It will impact the auto industry, dairy farmers, pharmaceutical companies (and their patients), even people who share files online. In short, it is a comprehensive agreement.

We do not know what the text actually says. We have a rough idea based on leaked drafts of previous negotiating texts and the pronouncements of various officials privy to the talks and the ridiculously vague summaries of the US Trade Representative and other official bodies, but the text itself has yet to be released for public consumption.

This is a reflection of the unprecedented secrecy that has shrouded these negotiations, including restricting members of US Congress’ access to the negotiating text to classified briefings and basement readings and paramilitary security with helicopter surveillance patrolling TPP summits for would-be protesters.

Who wins?

tppmickeyIn a word: business. No, not mom and pop corner store business, big multinational corporate business. But you probably could have guessed as much already. After all, there’s a reason the US Business Coalition for TPP existed, let alone spent over $1.1 million buying off Congressmen ahead of the “Fast Track” trade authority vote earlier this year.

Hollywood and the MPAA can celebrate more stringent international enforcement of their “intellectual property” to bolster their failing business model. Big Pharma likewise will benefit from mores string enforcement of their patents to prevent smaller countries from selling generic copies of their signature drugs. American dairy farmers are winners, gaining greater access to Canadian markets. American manufacturers will win as relaxed rules make it even easier to ship jobs to developing Asian countries. Vietnamese manufacturers benefit from that outsourcing even as they dodge the “labor organization” bullet.

In every case, the clear common denominator is that big business is going to win big time if the deal gets through.

Who loses?

stoptppPretty much everyone else. That’s why you’ll see an extraordinary range of people opposed to this deal, from the mainstream left (Hillary Clinton) and the mainstream right (Mike Huckabee) to the controlled “alternative” left (Noam Chomsky) and the controlled “alternative” right (The New American) to libertarians and environmental groups and trade unions and basically everyone who isn’t in favor of crony capitalism. Only a truly bad deal could bring together such a disparate bunch. And this deal is bad.

Vaguely worded agreements to standardize the protection of “trade secrets” threaten to undermine whistleblowers and journalists who are trying to expose corruption and counter needless secrecy.

A “three-step test” for approving member nations’ copyright limitations legislation threatens to make much of the open source / fair use reporting done by The Corbett Report and others illegal, or legally onerous to perform.

It threatens to introduce criminal sanctions on file sharers who are deemed to share on a vaguely defined “commercial scale” (perhaps including posting a link to a YouTube video on a blog).

Doctors Without Borders has been uncharacteristically vocal on this political issue, unequivocally stating that the TPP deal is “a bad deal for medicine.” (Some theorize this position earned them an unwelcome visit from the US military in Afghanistan.)

The list goes on and on, but one thing is certain: wage laborers, small businesses and others ‘too small to succeed’ can all find something to hate in this agreement.

What’s next?

In the US, Obama will not be able to sign the deal for 90 days, and it will be a month or more after that before the legislation to implement the deal is introduced in the house. This means the process will take months to complete, and likely come to a head in the heat of the 2016 sElection cycle.

And that’s just the US. Canada is likewise heading into an election this month and one of the main opposition parties has already stated that they will not feel bound by the deal. The Abe government in Japan, already reeling from public protest over recently passed “security” legislation to remilitarize the country, is facing a huge backlash from its farm lobby over the opening up of long-protected Japanese agricultural produce markets.

If there is any good news on the horizon, it’s that the deal’s ratification is still up in the air, with many being pessimistic of its chances in this politically volatile climate. But then, they said that about the negotiations themselves and look where that got us.

In the meantime, concerned men and women across the Pacific Rim collectively hold their breath for the full text in order to assess the potential damage.

Monsanto’s Migraine: Big Fiascoes Facing the World’s Biggest Seed Company

Note: Tweets are VERY difficult to re-post, go here to view the clever tweets mentioned below…mahalo!
The problems are piling up at the company’s front door.

Photo Credit: a katz/

Monsanto has been reeling from a number of setbacks around the globe. Here’s a look at some of the main reasons that 2015 has been a giant headache for the biotech giant. But that headache could find some reilef if the U.S. Senate hands them a legislative victory that would keep American consumers in the dark about what’s in their food.

Roundup Probably Causes Cancer

In March, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), the World Health Organization’s cancer arm, said that the controversial herbicide glyphosate — the main ingredient in Monsanto’s popular weedkiller Roundup — is “probably carcinogenic to humans.” IARC noted, “Case-control studies of occupational exposure in the USA, Canada, and Sweden reported increased risks for non-Hodgkin lymphoma that persisted after adjustment for other pesticides.” Used by home gardeners, public park gardeners and farmers, and applied to more than 150 food and non-food crops, Roundup is the Monsantot’s leading product and the world’s most-produced weedkiller.

In June, France banned Roundup. French Ecology Minister Segolene Royal said, “France must be on the offensive with regards to the banning of pesticides.” She added, “I have asked garden centers to stop putting Monsanto’s Roundup on sale” in self-service aisles. And earlier this month, California issued a notice of intent to list glyphosate as a carcinogen. “As far as I’m aware, this is the first regulatory agency in the U.S. to determine that glyphosate is a carcinogen,” said Dr. Nathan Donley, a scientist at the Center for Biological Diversity. “So this is a very big deal.”

In April, U.S. citizens filed a class action lawsuit against Monsanto, claiming that the company is guilty of false advertising by claiming that glyphosate targets an enzyme only found in plants and not in humans or animals. The plaintiffs argue that the targeted enzyme, EPSP synthase, is found in the microbiota that reside in human and non-human animal intestines. In addition to its potential cancer-causing properties, Roundup has been linked to a host of other health issues, environmental problems and the record decline of monarch butterflies.And in September, another of the company’s herbicides got slammed when a French appeals court confirmed that Monsanto was guilty of chemical poisoning, upholding a 2012 ruling in favor of Paul Francois, whose lawyers claimed the company’s Lasso weedkiller gave the cereal farmer neurological problems, including memory loss and headaches.

Tweet Backfires

Monsanto would probably love to forget one of their recent tweets that tried to put out the glyphosate-fueled public image fire. A day before the cancer-listing announcement by California’s EPA, Monsanto posted a tweet, asking if people has questions about glyphosate with a link to a FAQ page:

The tweet wasn’t the PR success that the company had hoped for. Instead of helping to alleviate consumer fears about the chemical, the tweet became a target for the Monsanto-hating Twitterati:

EU Nations Ban GMOs

In addition to the glyphosate backlash, Monsanto has had to deal with several EU countries who have said no to the company’s GM crops. A new European Union law signed in March allows individual member countries to be excluded from any GM cultivation approval request. European opposition to GMOs has been strong: Unlike in the Americas and Asia, where GMO crops are widely grown, only Monsanto’s pest-resistant MON810, a GMO maize, is grown in Europe. Several nations have taken advantage of the new exclusion law: Scotland, Germany, Latvia, Greece, France and recently, Northern Ireland, have all invoked it.

In August, Scotland became the first EU nation to ban the growing of genetically modified crops by requesting to be excluded by Monsanto’s application to grow GMO crops across the EU. “Scotland is known around the world for our beautiful natural environment — and banning growing genetically modified crops will protect and further enhance our clean, green status,” said Rural Affairs Secretary Richard Lochhead.

Germany cited strong resistance from farmers and the public when it made its opt-out request. “Germany has committed a true act of food democracy by listening to the majority of its citizens that oppose GMO cultivation and support more sustainable, resilient organic food production that doesn’t perpetuate the overuse of toxic herbicides,” said Lisa Archer, food and technology director at environmental nonprofit Friends of the Earth. “We are hopeful that more members of the EU will follow suit and that the U.S. Congress will protect our basic right to know what we are feeding our families by requiring mandatory GMO labeling.”

Soon after Germany’s decision, Latvia and Greece announced that they too are taking advantage of the EU law. France, too, is using the opt-out law to ensure the country’s GMO ban remains in place.

While anti-GMO activists warn of the dangers that genetically modified foods pose to health and the environment, the Big Food industry and many scientists argue that GMOs are safe and can help feed a skyrocketing human population. Monsanto told Reuters: “We regret that some countries are deviating from a science-based approach to innovation in agriculture and have elected to prohibit the cultivation of a successful GM product on arbitrary political grounds.” There is a significant political dimension as well: Newswire reported that the GMO opt-out law “directly confronts U.S. free trade deal supported by EU, under which the Union should open its doors widely for the U.S. GM industry.” It remains to be seen how the opt-out law will play out in the long run.

But for now, could the GMO resistance in Europe be working? Following the announcements by Latvia and Greece, EurActiv, an online news service covering EU affairs, reported that Monsanto “said it had no immediate plans to request approvals for any new GM seeds in Europe.”

The GMO Debate Rages On

The debate over genetically modified foods is complex, and not without its contradictions. While the anti-GMO movement appears to gaining steam, GMO foods have been a big part of the U.S. food system for many years. The vast majority of several key crops grown in the U.S. are genetically modified, including soy (93 percent), corn (93 percent) and canola (90 percent). As Morgan Clendaniel, editor of Co.Exist, points out, “Many crops are genetically modified so frequently, it’s nearly impossible to find non-GMO versions.” He adds that, althought 80 percent of all packaged food sold in America contain GMOs, consumers are kept in the dark, because the U.S. is “one of the few places in the developed world that doesn’t require food producers to disclose whether or not their ingredients have any modifications.”

One scientist who has been sharply critical of GM crops is David Williams, a cellular biologist at the University of California at Los Angeles. He says that “inserted genes can be transformed by several different means, and it can happen generations later,” which can result in potentially toxic plants. In addition, faulty monitoring of GM field tests presents another danger. For example, from 2008 to 2014, only 39 of the 133 GM crop field trials in India were properly monitored, “leaving the rest for unknown risks and possible health hazards.”

But within the scientific community, Dr. Williams is in the minority, In fact, as science writer David H. Freeman notes in Scientific American, “The vast major it of the research on genetically modified crops suggests that they are safe to eat.” David Zilberman, an agricultural and environmental economist at the University of California at Berkeley (who Freeman describes as “one of the few researchers considered credible by both agricultural chemical companies and their critics”) says that the use of GM crops “has increased farmer safety by allowing them to use less pesticide. It has raised the output of corn, cotton and soy by 20 to 30 percent, allowing some people to survive who would not have without it. If it were more widely adopted around the world, the price [of food] would go lower, and fewer people would die of hunger.”

The European Food Safety Authority said it will issue its scientific opinion on the GM crops by the end of 2017. For now, the GMO debate — filled with a host of pros and cons — rages on. But beyond the health and environmental threats that Monsanto’s products may pose, some worry that about the how control of the global food system is increasingly concentrated in a few biotech and agriculture megacorps like Monsanto, Syngenta, Bayer, Pioneer and DuPont. “Beating in the heart of every good capitalist is the heart of a monopolist,” says Neil Harl, an agricultural economist at Iowa State. “So we have to have rules, we have to have the economic police on the beat. Or we end up with concentration and that means higher prices.”

GMO Labeling Law: SAFE or DARK?