Vaccine bill could be a trend setter


Controversial legislation faces legal challenge if the governor signs

Opponents of a measure requiring nearly all California school children to be vaccinated gathered on the west steps of the Capitol after lawmakers approved the bill,  in Sacramento, Calif., Thursday, June 25, 2015.  The bill, SB277 co-authored by state Sen. Richard Pan, D-Sacramento and Ben Allen D-Santa Monica was approved by the Assembly. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

Opponents of a measure requiring nearly all California school children to be vaccinated gathered on the west steps of the Capitol after lawmakers approved the bill, in Sacramento, Calif., Thursday, June 25, 2015. The bill, SB277 co-authored by state Sen. Richard Pan, D-Sacramento and Ben Allen D-Santa Monica was approved by the Assembly. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli) The Associated Press

California has always had a reputation as a trend-setter, and the state’s recently passed vaccination bill has national bellwether potential — but only if it can survive the governor’s scrutiny and an almost certain legal challenge.

On Thursday, the Assembly approved Senate Bill 277, which would do away with “personal belief” and religious exemptions from vaccination. The legislation would prevent children from attending public schools if they have not received the full schedule of 10 vaccinations, from diphtheria to varicella.

The bill is expected to land on Gov. Jerry Brown’s desk soon, and if he signs it, then California will be one of only three states in the nation to grant vaccine exemptions only if a licensed doctor certifies that a child has a valid medical condition or family history of illness that makes inoculation unsafe.

According to the National Conference of State Legislatures, only two states, Mississippi and West Virginia, currently ban religious or personal-belief exemptions. While religious waivers for immunization are nearly universal in the U.S., 32 states have already eliminated personal-belief exemptions.

California’s measure arrives after the state saw 136 measles cases spring up during an outbreak this winter that started at Disneyland in Anaheim. The measles resurgence led lawmakers in a dozen states to consider modifying their exemption laws. But none has attempted changes as broad as California’s, said Christine Goodwin, a program manager at the National Conference of State Legislatures.

“In 2015, and in recent years, it seems that more states are considering more narrow changes to their exemption policies, rather than repealing them all together,” Goodwin said.

Earlier this year legislators in Oregon and Washington tabled proposals to repeal personal belief exemptions. Vermont successfully eliminated the option, but kept its religious exemption in place.

If successful, said several legal experts, California’s SB 277 could end up becoming the test case for the nation.

“When you have an influential state adopt a novel resolution and the legal structure is not well-defined you have the opportunity for a lot of uncertainty and a lot of impact,” said Glenn Smith, a professor of constitutional law at California Western School of Law.

Lawrence Gostin, director of the O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., said that California would definitely be a bellwether if its vaccine bill becomes law.

“Just as California led the way with climate change, it could lead the way with public health. If a state as large and influential as California were to signal the crucial importance of childhood vaccines, other states would surely take notice,” Gostin said.

But there are some big caveats included in all statements of precedent setting.

SB 277 has become quite controversial, drawing hundreds of protesters to Sacramento in recent weeks as the legislation was debated, and eventually approved, by both the state Senate and the Assembly.

http://www.utsandiego.com/news/2015/jun/28/sb277-vaccination-trend/

Corey Goode & David Wilcock – Open Your Mind Radio, Sunday 28th June 2015 –


Blackops World, Roswell Really Happened, Craft Technology, ET’s looked Like Humans, Anti-Gravity Crafts, They Have Been Out In The Solar System, SSP, ICC, Major Military Defense Contractors, 900 Different ET’s, Trade Setup Between Them, Money Stolen From The People, Awakening Process, Blue Avian Race, Secret Space Program, illuminati Criminals, False Flags, Energetic Waves Coming In, High Vibration Hitting The Planet, End Times Madness, People Being Triggered, Things Will Get Worse Before They Get Better, Giant Spires Came Into Our Solar System, NASA Feed, 2012, Solar Warden, Financial System Collapse, Prime Directive, We Need To Create The Change.

Archives: MP3 LISTEN HERE

” The Financial RESET & Triple Digit SILVER” CEO Keith Neumeyer ~ SGTreport.com


Keith Neumeyer, the outspoken and courageous CEO Of First Majestic Silver and Chairman of First Mining Finance joins me to dissect the obscene levels of precious metals manipulation by the international banking cabal. Neumeyer has led the charge of exposing the manipulation of silver via the paper markets and in 2014 suggested that silver mining companies ban together to form their own OPEC style “cartel” and withhold PHYSICAL silver production from the market. However, to date NOT ONE other mining CEO has had the will, tenacity or courage to join Neumeyer or even respond to him in any way. Mr. Neumeyer has since joined Ted Butler and GATA’s efforts to get the CFTC to take action to put an end to the criminality on the Comex as it relates to the manipulation of silver’s price.

“Wealth is moving from West to East… The world is changing and people need to be aware of that change in order to protect themselves and I think having precious metals in their portfolio is critical.” – Keith Neumeyer

Mr. Neumeyer joins us today to discuss all of these issues and much more. Thanks for tuning in.

Simon Black – Greeks are standing in line with garbage bags at ATMs


Reblogged from FollowingWorldChange

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June 29, 2015
Singapore

It is somewhat amusing that the word ‘crisis’ originates from Ancient Greece.

It’s actually a medical term; Hippocrates wrote extensively about ‘crisis’ being the key turning point in disease progression– the time at which it either overcomes the patient, or it subsides.

And though the word ‘crisis’ is thrown about routinely these days, it’s safe to say that Greece is now truly in crisis in the purest sense of the definition.

Same with the euro, for that matter.

A century from now when future historians write about our time, it’s highly likely they’ll conclude that the euro was the dumbest invention of this age.

And that will really be saying something because the competition is fierce: pet rocks. Acid-washed jeans. FATCA. Google Glass. Fox Business News. Obamacare.

But the euro deserves first prize in the ugly contest.

The idea was to take completely incompatible economies, pretend that they were all Germany, and put them under one monetary roof simply because they were on the same continent.

This is ridiculous, especially today. It’s 2015. Geography is an irrelevant anachronism.

Imagine jamming Argentina, Australia, Angola, and Azerbaijan into a currency union simply because they all start with the letter “A”. It’s just as pointless and arbitrary as geography.

And when one of them starts to collapse (probably Argentina), rather than admit their mistake and dissolve the whole stupid idea, the bureaucrats spend massive amounts of other people’s money fruitlessly trying to hold the project together.

This is what’s happened in Europe.

Every time they wrote a bailout check or extended another loan package to Greece, all the bureaucrats did was INCREASE their risk exposure.

It’s like running back into a burning building– literally the *exact opposite* of what any sensible person would do.

Eurocrats have spent untold billions of other people’s money to save face, just so they wouldn’t have to admit that Project “Make Everyone Germany” has failed.

But what they never acknowledged was that no matter how much they extend and pretend, the disease will always reach its crisis.

And this financial disease is going to slay the patient. History is very clear on this point: debt kills.

Greece long ago reached the point of no return where they were borrowing money just to pay interest. Now it’s time for brutal honesty: game over.

The best example of brutal honesty is across the pond in Puerto Rico– America’s Greece. The governor of Puerto Rico, Alejandro Garcia Padilla, did not mince words when he described the island’s prodigious debt:

“The debt is not payable. There is no other option. I would love to have an easier option. This is not politics, this is math.”

The lesson is pretty clear: a bad system will fail. Especially when that system is built on a mountain of debt and deceit.

It might take years, but it happens. Just look at Greece; it’s taken nearly six years from when it was first identified to reach today’s crisis.

The time in between can either be an opportunity or a curse.

For some, time is an opportunity to take action– to quietly take defensive steps like moving money abroad.

Greeks had the opportunity to do that long ago when the euro was strong and the capital controls didn’t exist.

But for most people, time is a reason to procrastinate. They think that because it didn’t collapse today, tomorrow will be just fine. So they stick their heads in the sand. Or somewhere else.

And now those people are standing in line at ATM machines across Greece with empty garbage bags trying to figure out how to survive against strict capital controls.

Don’t wait.

Until tomorrow,
Signature
Simon Black
Founder, SovereignMan.com

Warning! No Greek “Deal” Sends Global Stock Markets Plunging: Contagion, Financial Meltdown. Global Economic Collapse NOW! By Gregory Mannarino


  • Jun 29, 2015 2:04 PM

    Global debt saturation has indeed hit critical mass.

    In a very surprising turn of events, every last ditch effort to thwart a Greek financial/economic meltdown has failed. With no real solution even possible, it appears that the end is here as the gargantuan global debt bubble has topped out.

    The issue here is not a just Greek problem but an insurmountable, unfixable debt bubble which has the entire world and every single developed nation in it’s hideous grip. As this debt Frankenstein begins to manifest itself, the peoples of the world are going to get a horrific dose of reality.

    If now is in fact the time when this entire financial scheme of unsound money ends, the entire global landscape including a mass “correction” in human population is at hand. Click here: Global Debt And The Human Bubble.

    World central banks have fostered, created, and allowed to manifest a malignant threat to every human being on this planet by inflating a financial debt bubble which is the greatest threat to human life bar none.

    Moreover, the day of reckoning may be here.

    The debt obligations of not just Greece, but every developed nation on the planet can never be paid back nor can the debt be “forgiven.” The entire malignant system demands that ever increasing amounts of debt constantly be borrowed into existence in larger and greater amounts. Without the ability to continually borrow, you have a crisis like we are witnessing in Greece right now. The issue here is contagion.

    With the root cause of the problem being debt, and the perpetual demanding of more debt which must be added to fuel the monster, world central banks are powerless to stop a global catastrophe.

    The world is now staring into an economic abyss unlike anything ever seen in history, and a global economic meltdown truly epic in scale.

    RELATED VIDEO. Click here: WARNING! Contagion, Financial Meltdown, Global Economic Collapse NOW!

    Disclosure: I am/we are short IWM.

Back To Gregory Mannarino’s Instablog HomePage »Instablogs are blogs which are instantly set up and networked within the Seeking Alpha community. Instablog posts are not selected, edited or screened by Seeking Alpha editors, in contrast to contributors’ articles.

http://seekingalpha.com/instablog/29482055-gregory-mannarino/4137065-shocker-no-greek-deal-sends-global-stock-markets-plunging

WARNING! Contagion, Financial Meltdown, Global Economic Collapse NOW! By Gregory Mannarino

SpaceX Explosion & Fact Facts on the Event | S0 News June 29, 2015


Discussing Earthquakes with Kongpop: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ThCUZ…
Pause on Pausing the Pause: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CZH46…
Earth’s Magnetic Reversal: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sIayx…
Top 6 Climate Change Problems: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Ew05…
Sun Series: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…
10 Amazing Solar Eruptions: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1qBwm…

Stand with the Apache: No mining on sacred land!


Note: The attack on tribal sacred lands has gone overboard with corporate entities attempting to desecrate ancient sacred sites, while stripping every last resource available. Please join me in standing with the Apache in one BIG HELL “NO” to Congress in handing over Oak Flats to “foreign” a mining company.
The Apache join Hawai’i’Ti’s Kanaka Maoli (TMT Telescope on Mauan Kea) and tribes worldwide in protecting and preserving sacred lands.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The US government is about to handover a beautiful stretch of national forest held sacred by the local Apache tribe — to a giant foreign mining company. It’s a national disgrace, but if we come together now we have a real chance to block the mine.

Our country’s shameful, criminal mistreatment of Native Americans is no secret. And when Arizona lawmakers snuck this mining proposal into a critical national defense bill last year, Apache leaders and activists vowed to fight back. That pressure is working and right now Congress is considering whether to stop the mining project. If we back the Apache’s call with tens of thousands of voices nationwide, we can help protect this land for good.

Next month, tribal leaders are planning a cross-country trip to DC to defend the land that’s hosted important ceremonies for generations. If enough of us stand with the Apache, we can meet them on arrival and build a huge groundswell of support for their courageous fight on Capitol Hill. Sign now:

https://secure.avaaz.org/en/stand_with_the_apache_loc/?bHGVHeb&v=61248

The Oak Flat area of the Tonto National Forest in Arizona has had protected status since the Eisenhower Administration, out of recognition of its natural beauty and cultural significance. The local San Carlos Apache use if for coming of age ceremonies and other rituals. And repeated attempts to open the land up to mining have failed to pass Congress. That’s why Arizona’s Senators John McCain and Jeff Flake’s decision to tie the provision to a critical national defense vote last year was so cynical.

Supporters of the mining plan say it will bring jobs to the area, but local leaders question the benefits and highlight the cost. And that cost is clear: A massive 2 mile-long copper mine at Oak Flat would destroy a holy site that Apache have used since time immemorial. It boggles the mind that in 2015 the US government is still stomping on Native American rights like this, at the behest of foreign mining interests to boot.

Let’s join the fight to protect this sacred land. When enough of us have signed to get Congress’s attention, we’ll deliver our call to leaders in Congress and stand shoulder to shoulder with the Apache to defend against this attack on their heritage. Sign now and spread the word:

https://secure.avaaz.org/en/stand_with_the_apache_loc/?bHGVHeb&v=61248

From the Brazil to Tanzania, our community has stood behind local communities protecting their natural and cultural heritage. Now we have a critical opportunity to make sure our own government honors its commitments and moral responsibility to the Apache.

With hope and determination,

Nick, Joseph, Rewan, Emma and the rest of the Avaaz team

More Information:

Selling Off Apache Holy Land (New York Times)
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/29/opinion/selling-off-apache-holy-land.html

Tribe’s protest of mine plan near Superior is in 3rd week (Arizona Daily Star)
http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/tribe-s-protest-of-mine-plan-near-superior-is-in/article_f551fab1-853b-5826-9037-9ddb3739e5fc.html

Apache tribe distressed by privatization of sacred land (Arizona Daily Star)
http://tucson.com/news/apache-tribe-distressed-by-privatization-of-sacred-land/article_c8f9f32c-80c0-11e4-a781-a7334409bcc3.html

Save Oak Flat
http://www.apache-stronghold.com

Opponents renew fight against Superior copper mine
http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/arizona/politics/2015/06/17/superior-copper-mine-congress-bill-stop/28894741/

Greece debt crisis: Alexis Tsipras imposes capital controls with banks to remain shut and markets closed


Banks have no way to replenish fast diminishing deposits after European Central Bank decided not to increase emergency liquidity

Greece’s banks will stay shut on Monday in an effort to prevent customers withdrawing their savings and causing the collapse of the country’s already fragile financial system.

A run on the banks was seen as practically inevitable after the dramatic events of the weekend, when Alexis Tsipras, the Greek Prime Minister, shocked and infuriated European negotiators by declaring he would put the latest bailout proposals to a referendum vote. Greeks were lining up outside ATMs again on Sunday after a weekend of frenzied withdrawals.

Until Mr Tsipras’s statement in the early hours of Saturday morning, it had been widely expected that the Greek government would accept the terms of the European offer. But in the event, Mr Tsipras opted to turn five years of negotiations on its head and put the bailout to the people, declaring the offer from his country’s creditors was “blackmail”.

Alexis Tsipras turned five years of negotiations on its head (Getty) Alexis Tsipras turned five years of negotiations on its head (Getty)
Greece’s current financial lifeline ends on Tuesday, with the referendum timed for next Sunday. Eurozone officials at the EU snubbed Mr Tsipras’s demand for a delay in the deadline. Some European officials called for renewed efforts by both sides. “We don’t know – none of us – the consequences of an exit from the eurozone, either on the political or economic front,” said Manuel Valls, the French Prime Minister. “We must do everything so that Greece stays in the eurozone.

“But doing everything, that means respecting Greece and democracy, but it’s also about respecting European rules. So Greece needs to come back to the negotiating table.”

The European Central Bank has been keeping Greece’s banks afloat with emergency funding as people have been withdrawing their cash at a record pace. But on Saturday, while agreeing to continue the lifeline, they refused to increase it.

Without an increase in emergency liquidity, which currently stands at just under €90bn (£64bn), Greece’s four major banks could soon run out of cash and be forced to implement capital controls. Those restrictions could keep Greek banks functioning – but they would mean a deepening of the financial crisis and could take Greece a step closer to leaving the euro.

READ MORE: It’s time to abandon this failed experiment in currencies
‘What kind of Europe is this that uses the euro as a tool of submission?’
ECB says it is not increasing emergency credit

Bank of Greece governor Yannis Stournaras said that the central bank would “take all measures necessary to ensure financial stability”. Individual banks in the country have been imposing limits in daily cash transactions for several days.

The country’s banking crisis could deal a fatal blow to this summer’s tourism season, with visitors staying away amid fears they may be unable to access money.

Reuters reported that the stock exchange in Athens will also be closed on Monday.

Financial markets were expected to react badly when trading resumes for the first time since Friday’s close, with Britain’s FTSE-100 Index of leading shares expected to fall 3 per cent and Germany’s DAX by 4 per cent, according to the financial spread betting company IG.

However, a Greek departure from the euro is still far from inevitable, analysts said. The man who invented the term “Grexit” – Citigroup economist Ebrahim Rahbari, said: “We expect the referendum to result in a comfortable majority for the  Yes camp, and expect no Grexit this year and a lower risk of Grexit in subsequent years.”

Mr Rahbari and his team last year put the chances of a Greek exit from the currency at 90 per cent.

Two opinion polls published on Sunday indicated that more Greeks want to stay in the eurozone and make a deal with creditors than want a rupture with the country’s European partners.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/greece-crisis-alexis-tsipras-imposes-capital-controls-with-banks-to-remain-shut-10351481.html

California’s Drought Could Upend America’s Entire Food System


May 5, 2015 Posted by

[Translate]


Irrigation water in California.

AP

CLIMATE PROGRESS

On April 1, California Governor Jerry Brown stood in a field in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, beige grass stretching out across an area that should have been covered with five feet of snow. The Sierra’s snowpack — the frozen well that feeds California’s reservoirs and supplies a third of its water — was just eight percent of its yearly average. That’s a historic low for a state that has become accustomed to breaking drought records.

In the middle of the snowless field, Brown took an unprecedented step, mandating that urban agencies curtail their water use by 25 percent, a move that would save some 500 billion gallons of water by February of 2016 — a seemingly huge amount, until you consider that California’s almond industry, for example, uses more than twice that much water annually. Yet Brown’s mandatory cuts did not touch the state’s agriculture industry.

Agriculture requires water, and large-scale agriculture, like that in California, requires large amounts of water. So when Governor Brown came under fire for exempting farmers from the mandatory cuts — farmers use 80 percent of the state’s available water — he was unmoved.

“They’re not watering their lawn or taking long showers,” he told ABC’s “The Week” the Sunday after he announced the restrictions. “They’re providing most of the fruits and vegetables of America to a significant part of the world.”

Almonds get a lot of the attention when it comes to California’s agriculture and water, but the state is responsible for a dizzying diversity of produce. Eaten a salad recently? Odds are the lettuce, carrots, and celery came from California. Have a soft spot for stone fruit? California produces 84 percent of the country’s fresh peaches and 94 percent of the country’s fresh plums. It produces 99 percent of the artichokes grown in the United States, and 94 percent of the broccoli. As spring begins to creep in, almost half of asparagus will come from California.

“California is running through its water supply because, for complicated historical and climatological reasons, it has taken on the burden of feeding the rest of the country,” Steven Johnson wrote in Medium, pointing out that California’s water problems are actually a national problem — for better or for worse, the trillions of gallons of water California agriculture uses annually is the price we all pay for supermarket produce aisles stocked with fruits and vegetables.

Up to this point, feats of engineering and underground aquifers have made the drought somewhat bearable for California’s farmers. But if dry conditions become the new normal, how much longer can — and should — California’s fields feed the country? And if they can no longer do so, what should the rest of the country do?

“It’s Not Just A California Drought Problem, It’s A Problem With Our Whole Food System”

In 2014, some 500,000 acres of farmland lay fallow in California, costing the state’s agriculture industry $1.5 billion in revenue and 17,000 seasonal and part time jobs. Experts believe the total acreage of fallowed farmland could double in 2015 — and that news has people across the country thinking about food security.

“When you look at the California drought maps, it’s a scary thing,” Craig Chase, who leads the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture’s Marketing and Food Systems Initiative at Iowa State University, told ThinkProgress. “We’re all wondering where the food that we want to eat is going to come from. Is it going to come from another state inside the U.S.? Is it going to come from abroad? Or are we going to grow it ourselves? That’s the question that we need to start asking ourselves.”

The California Central Valley, which stretches 450 miles between the Sierra Nevadas and the California Coast Range, might be the single most productive tract of land in the world. From its soil springs 230 varieties of crops so diverse that their places of botanical origin range from Southeast Asia to Mexico. It produces two thirds of the nation’s produce, and, like Atlas with an almond on his back, 80 percent of the world’s almonds. If you’ve eaten anything made with canned tomatoes, there’s a 94 percent chance that they were planted and picked in the Central Valley.

Some crops will always be grown in California. The Napa Valley, where a history of earthquakes has resulted in 14 different microclimates perfect for wine, is a truly unique place for growing grapes. The maligned almond is a great crop for California — it needs brief, cold winters and long, dry summers, and produces more value than it uses water, something rare for crops. Realistically, there aren’t many places in the world better suited to growing almonds than California.

But a lot of the things that California produces in such stunning numbers — tomatoes, lettuce, celery, carrots — can be grown elsewhere. Before the 20th century, the majority of produce consumed in the United States came from small farms that grew a relatively diverse number of crops. Fruit and vegetable production was regional, and varieties were dictated by the climate of those areas.

“There may be reason for the citrus and some of the nuts that are uniquely suited to the Mediterranean climate, but there’s no real reason that you have to produce all the fruits and vegetables. Those were grown other places before California came in,” John Ikerd, professor emeritus of Agricultural & Applied Economics University of Missouri Columbia, told ThinkProgress.

Ikerd, who taught agricultural economics before becoming an advocate for sustainable farming, grew up in rural Missouri, where he estimates that the majority of the food he ate came from within 50 miles of his home. At that time, the Midwest was still covered with small and mid-sized farms growing a diverse portfolio of crops. Ikerd described a tomato cannery in the town where he grew up, built to process the tomatoes grown in the farms from the surrounding area. Orchards, too, were once plentiful throughout the Midwest, growing apples and fruit for markets both local and national.

But the tomato canneries and the orchards that Ikerd remembers have largely disappeared, replaced by fields upon fields of corn and soybeans, commodity crops that government subsidies help make the quickest, fastest way to profit in the Midwest. From 1996 until the most recent version of the Farm Bill, farmers that grew commodity crops like corn and soil were actually prohibited from also growing specialty crops like fruits and vegetables on their land. Anyone who grew a specialty crop on land meant for subsidized commodity crops would have to forfeit their subsidy and pay a penalty equal to the market value of whatever specialty crop they grew, a policy that did little to discourage farmers in the Midwest from becoming large producers of one or two commodity crops. The U.S. government spent almost $84.5 trillion dollars subsidizing corn between 1995 and 2012, and a good portion of corn crops does not make it to a plate, instead used as ethanol or feed for livestock.

Of the corn that is intended for consumption, much of it ends up as high fructose corn syrup, which is now so ubiquitous it encourages maximizing the yield of corn at the expense of agricultural diversity. From 2002 to 2012, the amount of land dedicated to growing the nation’s top 25 vegetables fell from 1.9 million acres to 1.8 million. In the same amount of time, corn production grew from 79 million acres to 97 million.

“The deeper people look at it, they’ll see it’s a deeper part of the whole,” Ikerd says. “It’s not just a California drought problem, it’s a problem with our whole food system.”

A map showing where various crops are grown across the U.S.

A map showing where various crops are grown across the U.S.

CREDIT: Bill Rankin

In 2010, the Leopold Center at Iowa State University ran some numbers to figure out what would happen if a small stretch of Midwestern farmland — just 270,000 acres — was used to grow vegetables instead of corn or soybeans. They found that diversifying even that small amount of land — basically the amount of cropland in an average Iowa county — across six Midwestern states would yield almost enough produce to supply all the residents of Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin, Michigan, and Minnesota for the entire year.

But that conversion is easier said than done, according to Chase. Farming corn requires a completely different infrastructure than farming produce, and he doesn’t see farmers jumping to replace their crops and machinery with California still capable of producing fruits and vegetables. Equipment for corn or soy farming can cost upwards of $100,000, a financial commitment that encourages farmers to grow crops that are easy to plant and harvest with the machinery.

“It’s not a land issue and it’s not a soil quality issue,” Chase said. “A lot of it is an infrastructure issue or a labor issue, particularly with those products that are so extremely labor intensive.”

Matt Kroul, co-owner of Kroul Farms in Mt. Vernon, Iowa, explains that for farmers — stereotypically a stubborn bunch — changing what’s grown can be difficult. Kroul farms 1,200 acres that have been in his family since the 1800s; for decades, his grandfather and grandmother farmed corn and soy, but the farm crisis of 1980 forced Kroul’s father to diversify their enterprise. Today, the farm produces a mix of commodity crops and seasonal produce, which it sells both directly to consumers via markets and a farmstand, and to local restaurants. Kroul feels fortunate that the farm was both small enough to be able to adapt to new crops and well-connected enough within the community to find a consumer base, but he acknowledges that in Iowa, this isn’t the case for everyone.

“You’d love to see it change, you’d love to see consumers drive that market to push more local foods,” Kroul said, but he worries that large-scale commodity farmers won’t want to change what they’ve always done. “Farmers are going to continue to grow what they’ve always grown. It’s a slippery slope in their mind to turn some acres over to vegetable and other growth.”

But Ikerd believes that the system can — and must — adapt to changing conditions. He remembers a time when fruit trees dotted the Midwest, and he also remembers watching as they were steadily replaced by large operations growing corn or soy or both. The system we have now, Ikerd says, was all built in the last 50 years. And he thinks a more sustainable system could be put in place just as quickly.

“This System Was A Fantasy”

Why do we grow so much of our produce in one place? And why California?

“There’s plenty of good soil elsewhere,” Richard Walker, professor emeritus of geography at the University of California, Berkeley, told ThinkProgress. “But it’s the ability to put water on [that soil] over a long, dry summer that allows you to get very quick results.”

When it comes to irrigation, California is a powerhouse. Some 9 million acres of farmland are irrigated each year, making California the state with the second-largest amount of irrigated land (behind Nebraska).

But it wasn’t always like that. Back in the early days before California’s modern agriculture — during the mining boom of the mid-1800s — the state’s primary crops were wheat and corn. Farmers grew the grain without irrigation, finding that California’s short, rainy winters, long, hot summers, and nutrient-rich soil created the perfect growing conditions without the need for extra water. By the 1890s, however, the intense grain industry had depleted the soil, and California’s farmers were forced to find another crop.

With a Mediterranean climate, California has always been particularly well-suited to growing produce. Toward the turn of the 20th century, fruit and vegetable production in the state exploded in growth, helped along by the transcontinental railroad, which could carry California’s produce — fresh, frozen, or canned — to East Coast markets where it fetched a handsome price. Between the 1880s and the 1930s, the amount of cropland dedicated to fruits and vegetables increased ten times over — and most of that depended on irrigation.

At first, irrigation projects were small, created by organizations of farmers banding together to build small local dams on small local rivers. By the 1930s, Walker says, all the best, most naturally fertile land had been developed — but demand for dependable year-round produce was only increasing, thanks to the rise of supermarkets and shrewd advertising from California agribusiness. So, farmers turned their eyes to something bigger.

“A water system grew with the rise of the state to economic prominence, from individual projects to irrigation districts and colonies to state-engineered projects,” Steven Stoll, associate professor of history at Fordham University, told ThinkProgress. “Their rising political power ensured that they would get the water they needed — no matter what.”

These big projects — sponsored by both the state and federal government — brought water to unexpected places, like the Westlands, a barren area southwest of Fresno that has historically received around eight inches of rain annually. By most accounts, the Westlands could be classified as a desert. It was instead transformed into farmland by funneling water in from San Joaquin-Sacramento River Delta to meet the demands of industry.

“But here is the point — the water existed. It flowed out of the Sierra up and down the Central Valley. It only needed to be captured, stored, and directed,” Stoll says. The Westlands became farmland at a certain point in the history of California agriculture where massive engineering projects were the solution to any problem. As long as water continued to flow from the Sierras, human ingenuity — and water from the Sacramento and Colorado Rivers — was all that was needed to bring that water to the fields.

“Human societies for the last 10,000 years have arisen on that same assumption — climatic stability, the continuation of certain trends indefinitely,” Stoll says. “No one could have known, or only few did, that fossil fuels had the capacity of changing those conditions.”

As Walker sees it, California agribusiness, for a long time, has dealt with problems through engineering. But now — after a century of diverting rivers — there’s simply less surface water to work with.

“It turns out that you can’t overcome all the problems with engineering,” Walker says. “You don’t even need climate change to know that this system was a fantasy.”

Alongside surface water, farmers can access groundwater, natural aquifers that have been soaking up water that falls in California — as rain or as snow — for thousands of years. Within the complicated web of water rules in California, groundwater is a complete free-for-all — anyone who taps it can use it.

In an average year, water from underground aquifers supplies California with 30 to 40 percent of the state’s water supply — in drought years, that number jumps to 60 percent. This year, that number could be as high as 75 percent.

But groundwater takes thousands of years to fill up, and California farmers are being forced to drill deeper and deeper — sometimes thousands of feet into the Earth — to find groundwater for their farms. That deep drilling is beginning to mar the California landscape, lowering water tables and causing the ground to sink. Shallow wells are being sucked dry by those with the resources to drill deeper, and communities are being deprived of their groundwater safety nets. According to the New York Times, the depletion of groundwater has terminally damaged California’s soil, lessening its ability to reabsorb and store water in the future.

Last fall, the California legislature addressed the problem of overpumping groundwater, passing a bill that forces communities to regulate the extraction of water from underground aquifers. It was a big moment, the first time in the state’s history that anyone had dared to place restrictions on groundwater use. But it was also a bill that, in a lot of ways, fell short of actually fixing the problem: communities are given years, decades even, to formulate their plans for replenishing and conserving groundwater, meaning that many of the effects of the bill won’t be felt until 2040.

“There’s no more water in the system,” Walker says. “That’s what they have to realize. Where’s the water you’re going to pump this year? It’s not there.”

Taking Pressure Off California With A Regionalized Food System

In 2013, the USDA published a report looking at the impact of climate change on the United State’s agriculture — a comprehensive overview of available literature meant to serve as an input to the National Climate Assessment. Climate change, the report concluded, would fundamentally alter the way that crops and livestock are raised in this country. Crops that depend on irrigation would be especially vulnerable as both increasing temperatures and changing precipitation patterns place stress on water resources.

“Some U.S. agricultural systems, such as those currently operating at their southern marginal limit or those that currently depend on irrigation, will have to undergo more transformative changes to remain productive and profitable,” the report read.

California has a finite amount of water to split between a seemingly infinite number of needs: from drinking water to residential lawns, swimming pools to protected streams, almond trees to alfalfa sprouts. For decades, irrigation and ground water have been enough to transform otherwise unsuitable areas into productive farmland. The Midwest could specialize in commodity crops because specialty crops could be — and were — grown easier elsewhere.

Climate change is altering that balance. Though evidence connecting the current drought to climate change is the subject of debate, studies show that man-made climate change certainly won’t help the situation. A recent study out of Stanford found that human emissions increase the probability of the low-precipitation, high-temperature conditions that have made this drought so tough. Another study from NASA also found that if emissions continue to increase, the American Southwest has an 80 percent chance of facing a multi-decade megadrought from 2050 through the end of the century.

Mike Hamm, director of the Michigan State University Center for Regional Food Systems, hopes that those projections — of more frequent and longer-lasting droughts — don’t come true. He hopes that California can still produce as many fruits and vegetables in 30 years as it does now — but he also thinks that, to safeguard our food system, we need to move toward a more regionalized system of production.

“We need California production as long as and as much as it can be contained, and we need to regionalize production of fruit and vegetables as much as we can, in part to take water pressure off of California and in part to take pressure off of developing countries where we get fruits and vegetables from,” Hamm told ThinkProgress. Michigan, Hamm says, is already fairly well-situated for regional, diverse produce. Places like Iowa, that have seen their land consumed by large commodity farms, would face a more difficult transition.

“They neither have the land that is producing it, nor do they have the human capital,” Hamm says. “On the other hand, historically, in a place like Iowa, they had a very diverse agriculture with a lot of fruits and vegetables, which says that they have the climatic and environmental capacity to do it.”

To switch from a single crop to a diverse portfolio might seem daunting, but it’s change that has already begun to happen elsewhere. Thirty years ago, late spring would have signaled the beginning of the growing season for the most predominant crop in western North Carolina: tobacco, which had been grown in the region since the late 1600s. Federal quotas instated as part of the New Deal assured farmers a minimum price for their product in exchange for a set yield, a program that gave small farmers a measure of security for growing a high-value but labor-intensive crop. In 2002, the tobacco industry in North Carolina accounted for $800 million — roughly 12 percent of the state’s agricultural revenue.

That all changed in 2004, when quotas were phased out as part of a President George W. Bush’s American Jobs Creation Act.

“It was a big change, like a hurricane coming through,” Charlie Jackson, executive director of the Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project (ASAP), told ThinkProgress, explaining that three decades ago, western North Carolina had some 7,000 tobacco farms — according to the 2012 census, that number is down to 94.

But farming didn’t disappear in western North Carolina — instead, it transitioned, diversifying to produce fruits and vegetables for local markets with the help of ASAP. From 2002 to 2012, the number of farms in the area fell from 12,212 to 10,912, but the number of farms selling produce directly to the local community increased from 740 farms to 1,190. Instead of sales dropping with the decline of the tobacco industry, sales to consumers actually grew over $5,000 during that time. According to an ASAP report, by switching from tobacco to produce, farmers in the southern Appalachia’s could provide local communities with almost 40 percent of their yearly fruit and vegetable needs.

If the tobacco quotas had remained in place, Jackson says, the switch to regional produce farming might have been slower. “My guess is that there would still be a lot of farms growing tobacco,” he said.

Western North Carolina, in a way, was already primed for the transition to supplying diverse produce to the region. Because of the area’s mountainous geography, farms were already small, and they occupied different climatic regions, from 1,000 to 5,000 feet in altitude. Farmers in North Carolina hadn’t invested hundreds of thousands of dollars in specialized farming infrastructure, so they were more free, in a sense, to adapt to the changes ushered in by the end of tobacco quotas.

“It’s really an interesting thing, where something that could have been disastrous ends up being transformative,” Jackson said.

So will the California drought be disastrous, or transformative? Ask John Ikerd what he thinks, and he leans toward transformation.

“I’m not really pessimistic. If we decide we want to change agriculture, I think it’s quite conceivable that we can recreate this whole food system,” he said. “We just need to wake up to the fact that we’ve got a problem and start working on it. Once we do that, the solutions are there.”

http://www.globalpossibilities.org/californias-drought-could-upend-americas-entire-food-system/

A BOLD PLAN FOR SAVING POLLINATORS


Jun 27, 2015 Posted by


bees

“We need solutions to the bee crisis,” said Laurie Davies Adams, head of the Pollinator Partnership, at a packed briefing on Capitol Hill, which was organized by her organization and the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA). The honey bee crisis Adams is deeply worried about is caused by the spread of colony collapse disorder, which has decimated hives across the U.S. Scientists say a combination of stressors is killing off honey bees, including the loss of the habitat they need for foraging, the widespread use of agricultural pesticides and fungicides, and disease. Other critical pollinators, like native bees, monarch butterflies, and bats, face similar challenges. While the destruction of these species is a cause of concern in itself, it’s also causing real fears among many of country’s farmers who rely on honey bees to pollinate their crops, at a cost of billions every year.

President and First Lady Obama have a “personal interest” in fixing the problem, said Adams. President Obama launched an inter-departmental task force that led to a new national strategy for honeybees and other pollinators, which was just released a few weeks ago. Adams called this the “most comprehensive blueprint for conservation in the 21st century.” But she cautioned that the federal government alone can’t solve this problem: it will take state and local governments, non-profit community groups, farmers, businesses, and homeowners, too. In fact, a key part of the effort will be to get people with any type of property to step up, which is the goal of the newly-launched Million Pollinator Garden Challenge. As Nancy Somerville, Hon. ASLA, CEO of ASLA, added, landscape architects and designers also play a key role in turning landscapes at all scales into healthy habitats. “Restoring habitat for pollinators can happen even in very small patches.”

At the briefing, Anne Kinsinger, U.S. Geological Survey and one of the leaders in the presidential task force, said the group successfully brought together the many departments that can help — defense, transportation, education, and the General Services Administration (GSA). This task force, together with Reps. Alcee Hastings and Jeff Denham, have pushed for the Highway BEE Act, which would transform 17 million acres around highway right-of-ways into habitat for pollinators. For example, Interstate 35, which runs from Mexico from Canada, could be planted with milkweed, providing a source of nutrients for Monarch butterflies all along their migratory route.

interstate

Rep. Denham, who spoke at the briefing, said it would be a way to “beautify the highways while also creating a transportation system that supports healthy pollinators.” As of writing this post, the Highway BEE Act has passed the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works. Next steps to make this law are getting the act through the full Senate and also moving it through the House of Representatives.

While the Highway BEE Act moves through the Hill, the national strategy has already made some important contributions. It pulled together 75 leading bee scientists to come up with a “research action plan.” There are now targets: reduce colony collapse disorder by 50 percent in 10 years. Increase Monarchs’ numbers from around 37 million today to 225 million in 5 years. Restore 7 million acres of pollinator habitat through public-private partnerships, to aid all kinds of pollinators. As Kinsinger explained, “you can’t separate European honey bees from the 4,000 native bees.” The GSA is also already revising its policies for 3,000 government facilities to include best-practice land management techniques.

Robert Sneickus, FASLA, national landscape architect with the USDA’s National Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), which is charged with restoring vast public wildlife habitat, said pollinators are essential to 80 percent of flowering plants. In turn, the health of pollinators themselves are dependent on access to productive habitat. For Sneickus, what’s important is planting “winter cover crops” that will be green all winter so bees will have access to forage in all seasons as well as flowering annuals that come back year after year. Also, all types of landscapes should be planted for both pollinators and beauty. “If a landscape looks great, more people will want it.” He said landscape architects can create a “pollinator master plan” to restore even small patches and corridors as healthy, beautiful habitats.

pollinator

And then John Chandler, a fourth-generation California farmer and agriculture advocate, explained how honey bees are crucial to his farm, which grows almonds, peaches, plums, and nectarines. As bees continue to die off, the cost per hive continues to go up, reaching about $200 these days. Each acre of almonds, explained Chandler, needs about two hives, so just for one growing season Chandler will spend $350 million to cover his entire 800,000-acre farm. “It’s the single largest check to payout.”

“What are we doing as an industry?”, wondered Chandler. Beginning in the 70s, Blue Diamond almonds started to finance advanced bee research and then created some pamphlets for farmers. There were some common sense ideas: When bees are out pollinating during the day, farmers shouldn’t be spraying chemical pesticides or fungicides. Farms now do that spraying at night when bees have gone home to their hives. During spraying, all water sources are also covered up so they aren’t contaminated. Chandler said “bees are like us, they want clean, fresh water.”

But, clearly, even more is needed to restore pollinators to health. According to the speakers, a key piece of the puzzle is bringing back nutritious forage wherever possible. Let’s start with better integrating forage opportunities along highways. With today’s problems, we can’t afford single-use infrastructure anymore; a highway for both cars and pollinators makes more sense. And farmers could be given greater incentives to set aside parts of their farmland as forage, a strategy the UK government has been using for some time. Communities can turn their own thoroughfares into pollinator pathways. Just about any strip will work, given many pollinators have a multiple-mile foraging range, and, as Adams, explained, “if you plant it, they will find it.”

pollinator-path

Lastly, everyone with a yard needs some plants for pollinators, too. Learn more at the Million Pollinator Garden Challenge.

http://www.globalpossibilities.org/a-bold-plan-for-saving-pollinators/

Ed. Note: Not mentioned here is placing a BAN on ALL residential and commercial use of ROUND-UP. To restrict it’s use to evenings is only pandering to biotech firms and allowing the destruction of the environment to continue. Round-up’s residue on plants also has adverse effects on any living organism that comes into contact with it and it can also be aerosolized and carried by the wind, infecting children, adults and wildlife with the same detrimental affects.

New Technology: Police Camera Ball (VIDEO)


Note: Just more high tech toys for the NSA and all other law enforcement agency’s determined on violating basic civil rights. A “camera ball”??? Really? Sounds like a waste of money that could have been diverted toward rehabilitation for training officers to be decent humans when dealing with the public, or countless other programs to reform law enforcement officers into public servants once again.

 

Angela Merkels smarthphone was tapped what about yours?


Note: My Samsung Galaxy was bought in late 2013, fortunately it doesn’t have this sticker. Have no idea what the sticker is for, but it certainly appears to be suspicious in nature. Hmmmm…how about your phone?

I’m thinking I would remove the sticker and see how it goes from there :)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

An Mexican guy was busted for taking pictures and he found this on his Samsung battery! I checked my old Samsung Nexus (Google phone) and look what I found! It’s all about out safety right? So now you know how Angela Merkel and others feel about NSA snooping everywhere!

It could also be a NFC chip as some are stating… who knows? I would have embedded a survaillance chip deep into the phone itself..

What do you think?

Ryan Gosling: What Costco Doesn’t Want You to Know About Its Eggs


Note: Kudo’s to Gosling! Please share to help bring awareness to the barbaric conditions hens are enduring to bring food to our tables. Costco has serious problems when it comes to offering healthy foods to consumers and with deceptive forms of marketing, and it’s about time people are made aware of conditions which are abhorrently harmful to animals and endanger our health.

Have a blessed week! Mahalo, {~A~}

The actor calls it “appalling” that Costco markets eggs “with deceptive labeling on cartons featuring graphics of birds living out in a green pasture.”

Photo Credit: DFree/Shutterstock

Costco has been under intense criticism this week because it has yet to pledge to sell GMO-free salmon should the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approve it. Additionally, the Humane Society of the United States recently uncovered the fact that a Costco egg supplier uses abhorrent factory farming conditions to raise its egg-laying hens despite the fact that Costco made a public commitment eight years ago to eliminate cage confinement of chickens from its supply chain.

The undercover investigation revealed “a Costco egg supplier cramming chickens into tiny cages, forcing birds to live in cages with the decayed, mummified corpses of their dead cage-mates, and engaging in other inhumane practices that are bad for animals and food safety,” according to the Humane Society. The company is marketing their eggs in a highly misleading way, says the Humane Society, because the conditions they found at Costco’s egg supplier are “in stark contrast to the happy hens and green fields depicted on egg cartons sold at Costco.”

TAKE ACTION: Join Emily Deschanel and Tell Costco to Stop Selling Eggs from Caged Hens

Earlier this week, the campaign got some high-profile support from actor Ryan Gosling. In an open letter, Gosling wrote:

Video footage revealed abhorrent cruelty including rows upon rows of birds confined in filth-laden cages with the mummified corpses of their cage-mates—eating, sleeping, defecating and laying eggs on top of dead birds—and hens’ wings, legs and necks trapped in the corroded wires of their battery cages.

Gosling called it “appalling” that Costco would market its eggs “with deceptive labeling on cartons featuring graphics of birds living out in a green pasture.”

Check out the undercover investigation:

RELATED:

Every Day, U.S. Factory Farms Produce Enough Waste to Fill the Empire State Building

Would You Buy Meat If You Didn’t Know Where It Came from, or How It Was Raised?

The Fake Meat Market Is Surging

Consumers Score Huge Victory as Federal Judge Blocks Sysco and US Foods Merger

WINGED PLANET FOUND!/Nibiru/NASA


Published on Jun 24, 2015

Images now being shown of Winged Planet, Could this be the Legendary Nibiru?
5 h 42m 21.0s 22° 36′ 45.7″ These are The Google Sky Coordinates.

Egypt’s Secret Underground Temple Of Energy ~ Brien Foerster


Below the floor of the Temple of Dendara in Egypt there are secret chambers that the general public never saw during dynastic times. Come with us in April 2016 and see them for yourself:
http://www.khemitology.com

Mission to Mars: Disinformation to Hide Secret Mining of Red Planet


Note: If the claims below are true, they indicate the team at Exopolitics conducts due diligence in vetting and questioning the narrative of “alleged” whistleblowers and outing those who appear to be operatives. It also speaks volumes on psyops and disinformation campaigns being launched aimed at obfuscating the truth about existing mining operations on the Mars colony, the Secret Space Program and anti-gravity technology.

With story’s like this coming out, better keep the non-gmo popcorn well stocked, discernment as a guide and the magical thinking caps on. Also, word is circulating our planet’s about to get wholloped with a blast of photonic energy, if this is true – and most of us have felt a “game changer” coming for awhile now – then things are about to get real interesting on the planetary playing field.

Once again, too see images of the cosmic cloud permeating the inner planets and an in-depth discussion on cosmic weather affecting the planet, see both TU Deft Univ. presentations at www.SusanRennison.com. They really changed my perspective on the serious nature of Earth changes at hand, the physic behind the inevitable collapse of the matrix as the Earth increases in vibration and frequency and much more.

Written by Dr Michael Salla on June 17, 2015. Posted in exopolitics research

Mining on Mars

‘Chad Johnson’ claims to have spent nearly three days on Mars after a nearly eight month journey there and a similar time for the return trip. He says he flew as part of a crew of three U.S. astronauts on a secret Russian and Chinese funded private venture launched out of a remote Chinese region of the Gobi desert. The purpose was to collect rock samples to evaluate the potential for profitable mining operations for future Mars missions.

Johnson came to public attention after he posted the following twitter message in early 2012:

I was part of a team of 3 astronauts that went to Mars on a privately funded secret mission, 2 are now dead, they’re killing us to preserve the secret.

Intrigued by his message, Morgan Kochel contacted Johnson and conducted an interview using Twitter direct messaging system that was published sometime in February 2012 . Johnson claimed that he was on the run to avoid a similar fate to his two fellow crew members and had to communicate by Twitter for security reasons. He told Kochel that “Chad Johnson” was a pseudonym to protect himself and his family.

Kochel’s interview reveals an intriguing story. Close analysis of key elements in Johnson’s alleged Mars mission raises some troubling questions about whether his claims are genuine, fabricated or a mixture of both. Rather than being a genuine whistleblower revealing the truth about a secret mission to Mars, he may in fact be a covert operative attempting to deceive the public about what is really happening on Mars. To get an answer, we need to explore Johnson’s main claims and see whether these stand up to close scrutiny.

Johnson’s main claim is that the trip to Mars lasted a total of roughly 460 days using conventional rocket engines:

Training lasted twelve months, very intense, including psychiatric tests. It took us about 230 days to get there, and slightly less back. We used rocket technology regularly available now. Just bigger tanks and more thrust. Nothing unusual in equipment to get there, but better radiation protection, as you can imagine, due to journey time:

As to how much time he spent on Mars surface, Johnson said:

We were on the surface for about 65 hours, enough time to gather samples and collate gas makeup readings of the atmosphere, and to explore a little bit. Radiation was always going to be an issue, so we had strict allocations of surface time, then we had to return.

Problem is that any trip to Mars using conventional rockets would require at least a three month stay, not less than three days (65 hours) there due to the orbits of Mars and Earth as the following NASA website and diagram makes clear:

Just like you have to wait for Earth and Mars to be in the proper position before you head to Mars, you also have to make sure that they are in the proper position before you head home. That means you will have to spend 3-4 months at Mars before you can begin your return trip. All in all, your trip to Mars would take about 21 months: 9 months to get there, 3 months there, and 9 months to get back. With our current rocket technology, there is no way around this.

marstravel

With the conventional rocket technologies used by national space programs, it would be impossible for a Mars mission to spend less than three days on the surface before returning as Johnson claims.

Another troubling issue raised by Johnson’s story is the claim that the Russian and Chinese funders used American astronauts:

Read more

Extraterrestrial contact: International law & crimes against humanity


Written by Dr Michael Salla on June 20, 2015

ET Contact iinternational law crimes against humanity

On June 15, a legal scholar released a provocative article in Space Review analyzing international legal norms and rights that would apply to visiting extraterrestrial life. The Space Review article comes less than a month after a bill (The Space Act) was passed by the U.S. House of Representatives dealing with U.S. and international law as it applies to commercial activities in space.  “Legal implications of an encounter with extraterrestrial intelligence” is a very timely article due to international efforts to update commercial space laws, especially as it is becoming more likely than ever that eventually extraterrestrial life or artifacts will be encountered by national space programs – if they haven’t been already!

The Space Review article helps identify key issues about how to regard commercial activities in space that result from agreements with extraterrestrial life. In the case that some of these agreements violate international legal norms, then would this make such agreements valid or invalid? This is especially important since there have been testimonies by whistleblowers claiming that agreements have already been reached with alien visitors in secret space programs that allegedly involve crimes against humanity.

The author of “Legal implications of an encounter with extraterrestrial intelligence,” Babak Hassanabadi says that one of the first legal issues to resolve is whether extraterrestrials have the same “human rights” as the rest of us. He writes:

In a world first, a court in Argentina issued a historic and unprecedented ruling that favors the rights of an orangutan held in captivity. Sandra the orangutan was granted legal action so she may be transferred to a habitat in keeping with her development…. These developments with regard to assigning human-like rights for terrestrial nonhuman animals leaves no doubt for inferring that extraterrestrial intelligent life forms, at least in terrestrial legal systems’ point of view, will enjoy rights equal to their human counterparts.

Hassanabadi’s point is a fair one. If humanity is prepared to recognize an orangutan as having human rights, then we would do the same for extraterrestrials, even if they looked like Chewbacca, the Wookie from Star Wars.

Hassanabadi discusses what kind of laws would apply to alien visitors:

Although it seems very unlikely that technologically advanced aliens would recognize the political boundaries of our nation-states, if a spacecraft with aliens onboard landed anywhere on Earth, and they do not carry any political mission to make contact with humans, legally speaking they would be subject to the territorial jurisdiction in which they have entered unless otherwise collectively agreed upon by the international legal community.

If extraterrestrials land in New York City for example, then the laws of the Empire State and U.S. Federal laws would apply. In 1969, NASA passed a federal regulation dealing with ‘Extra-terrestrial Exposure’. The “Extraterrestrial Exposure Law” offers a legal precedent for the detention and indefinite imprisonment of any individual who comes into contact with extraterrestrials. Presumably extraterrestrials themselves could also be detained and quarantined under this little known NASA regulation that while officially withdrawn, created a legal precedent for its future use. May the Force be with any law enforcement officer trying to quarantine a Wookie.

Read more

Note: LOVE the last sentence about quarantining a Wookie, cops wouldn’t stand a chance…lmao ;)

US Congress to Protect Slave Labor on Mars & Corporate Space Colonies by Dr. Michael Salla


Written by Dr Michael Salla on June 26, 2015

US Congress to protect slave labor

On June 15, the U.S. House of Representatives took a major step in passing a bill that provides legal protection to space mining by U.S. based corporations that establish off-world operations. While most members of the House’s “Science, Space and Technology Committee” that passed the bill may have done so with the impression that they would protect the rights of U.S. companies in future space mining missions, they instead have provided legal protection to corporations that have been secretly conducting such operations for decades. This is especially significant given recent claims that off-world space mining by U.S. affiliated corporations have used slave labor on Mars and elsewhere in our solar system.

The bill, “H.R.1508: Space Resource Exploration and Utilization Act of 2015,” was introduced and referred to the Science, Space and Technology Committee by a bipartisan group of eight members on March 19, 2015. On June 15, after an 18-15 vote two days earlier in favor of amending the bill, it was officially sent to the full House for a vote in an upcoming session. An identical bipartisan bill has been introduced into the Senate by Senators Marco Rubio (R-FL) and Patty Murry (D-WA).

The Space Resource Exploration and Utilization Act ostensibly protects the rights of mining companies willing to invest significant financial resources in future space exploration. If, for example, a mining company establishes a base on Mars, then it would have the right to exploit the resources of Mars and be protected under U.S. Federal Law. Here is what the proposed Act has to say in Section 51302:

(a) Commercialization of space resource exploration and utilization
(1) IN GENERAL – The President, acting through appropriate Federal agencies, shall— facilitate the commercial exploration and utilization of space resources to meet national needs;

This clause raises the possibility that under U.S. “national needs” the President of the United States can provide resources and assistance to mining companies to establish off-world bases and mining. There is nothing particularly alarming here at the prospect of companies such as SpaceX being given assistance to plan future Mars missions that establish mining bases to fund themselves. Back on November 16, 2012, SpaceX founder Elon Musk announced his plans to build a colony of 80,000 people: “At Mars, you can start a self-sustaining civilization and grow it into something really big.”

The next clause of the Space Resource Exploration and Utilization Act does raise some disturbing issues however:

(2) discourage government barriers to the development of economically viable, safe, and stable industries for the exploration and utilization of space resources in manners consistent with the existing international obligations of the United States;

What exactly does “discourage government barriers” mean? That appears to be short hand for saying that any government regulations are unnecessary and could be a significant impediment for profitable mining operations. For example, if the mining company was to exploit workers in slave-labor like conditions, this would be a problem for the mining company to resolve, rather than federal regulators imposing U.S. labor standards.

The subsequent clause is even more alarming:

(3) promote the right of United States commercial entities to explore outer space and utilize space resources, in accordance with the existing international obligations of the United States, free from harmful interference…

What does “free from harmful interference” mean? In the case of a mining corporation imposing slave labor working conditions, this clause suggests that international organizations such as the International Criminal Court would not have the power to directly intervene. Basically, managers at prospective space mining operations would be protected under U.S. Federal Law from international organizations investigating them for using slave labor.

Finally, the Space Resource Exploration and Utilization Act specifies the U.S. district courts as having “Exclusive Jurisdiction”:

Exclusive Jurisdiction: The district courts of the United States shall have original jurisdiction over an action under this chapter without regard to the amount in controversy.

Basically, this means that any human rights issues arising in the mining operations of corporations with off-world bases would have to be addressed through U.S. district courts.

The Space Resource Exploration and Utilization Act raises some very troubling legal issues about future mining operations by U.S. based mining corporations. However, rather than a hypothetical legal problem to be debated by space law attorneys, there is testimonial evidence that space mining operations already secretly exist. Furthermore, it has been claimed that these mining operations use slave labor on Mars and other locations in the solar system.

Read more

Aurora borealis glows in central Virginia, seen as far south as Texas (Photos) and apparent “Sphere Alliance” message confirmation


Note: These images come from American Kabuki’s blog where a lady named Denise claims to have contact with beings from the Sphere Alliance who apparently communicated about “pink energy’s” not long before these photo’s were taken. I haven’t been following the conversations, so follow the like below if you would like to learn more.

It’s been suspected for quite some time now, that intelligence operatives were planted in the One People’s community in Morroco – which Bill was a high ranking member of. Whether or not Denise (or Bill) are credible contacts I can’t say for sure, as always use discernment.

One thing is for sure, these are absolutely beautiful images coming in from parts of the USA that rarely, if ever see the Aurora Borealis dancing across the night sky…enjoy!

Looks like Denise got “a hit” and the message from the Sphere Alliance was verified…and on scehduled!  Also got a private double confirmation in an email from Denise of whom she is talking to… which I may write up later… so fun! -AK

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/capital-weather-gang/wp/2015/06/23/aurora-borealis-glows-in-central-virginia-seen-as-far-south-as-texas-photos/

Aurora borealis glows in central Virginia, seen as far south as Texas (Photos)
By Angela Fritz June 23 at 10:30 AM

A gorgeous aurora was seen on Cape Cod, Mass. last night. (Chris Cook via spaceweather.com)

A series of coronal mass ejections over the past few days have hurled bursts of solar gas and magnetic field at our planet, sparking a severe geomagnetic storm and pushing the aurora borealis deep into the Lower 48.

On Monday night, the northern lights were photographed in states that rarely get to witness the optical manifestation of a solar storm. The Northeast was brimming with hues of green, pink and purple, but photographers in Virginia, North Carolina, Georgia, Arkansas and even Texas.

[Solar eruptions trigger severe geomagnetic storm]

If you happened to head outside around 1:30 a.m. in central Virginia, you might have caught this view. A very dark sky was needed to see the aurora down here, but David Murr in Louisa, Va., shared some great northern lights with us.

Another shot from The Plains, Va.:

Georgia:

West Virginia:

Arkansas:

On the Appalachian Trail near the Massachusetts-Connecticut border:

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