Sitting silent in their classroom, the 30 children whose parents have not come to collect them after tsunami swept away their town


Unbelievable stories of heartbreak and loss, the carnage is beyond our wildest imagination…

By Daily Mail Reporter
Last updated at 1:43 AM on 18th March 2011

  • Reporters not allowed to speak to children to guard against false hope
  • Ishinomaki confirms the huge number of its citizens missing
  • North Eastern port town was hit by 20ft tsunami
  • Fears that overall death toll has been terribly underestimated

Even amid the carnage and despair of Japan’s tsunami victims, the plight of the 30 children at Kama Elementary School is heartbreaking.

They sit quietly in the corner of a third-floor classroom where they have waited each day since the tsunami swept into the town of Ishinomaki for their parents to collect them. So far, no one has come and few at the school now believe they will.

Teachers think that some of the boys and girls, aged between eight and 12, know their fathers and mothers are among the missing and will never again turn up at the gates of the school on the eastern outskirts of the town, but they are saying nothing.

Desolate: An elderly woman stands on a flooded street near her destroyed house at Ishinomaki, northeastern Japan, where 10,000 people are missingDesolate: An elderly woman stands on a flooded street near her destroyed house at Ishinomaki, northeastern Japan, where 10,000 people are missing 

Wholesale destruction: A few ruined houses are all that lies scattered amid the sludge of Ishinomaki

Wholesale destruction: A few ruined houses are all that lies scattered amid the sludge of Ishinomaki

Instead, they wait patiently reading books or playing card games watched over by relatives and teachers, who prevent anyone from speaking to them.

Officials fear that even the sound of the door sliding back might raise false hope that a parent has come to collect them. Their silence is in marked contrast to other children playing in the corridors of the four-storey building, whose parents survived due to a complete fluke.

Sports teacher Masami Hoshi said: ‘The tsunami came just when the parents of the middle age group were starting to arrive to collect their children so we managed to get them inside and to safety.

‘The younger ones had left with their parents a little earlier. The ones who went to homes behind the school probably survived, the ones who went the other way probably didn’t.’

The school, where children’s paintings still line the walls, has no running water, electricity or heating but is home to 657 people living among corridors and rooms filled by mud and debris. It is a mile from the sea wall that was meant to protect Ishinomaki.

When the tsunami struck, 160,000 people were living in the town, which is about 50 miles north-east of Sendai. So far 425 have been confirmed dead with another 1,693, including the parents of the 30 pupils, listed as missing.

The terrible toll of Japan’s double disaster became clearer as it emerged as many as 25,000 people could be dead after Ishinomaki officials confirmed that 10,000 of their citizens were missing.

The estimated 10,000 people missing in Ishinamaki is the same figure given as in the town of Minamisanriku, also in Miyagi state, which lost around half its population when it was razed to the ground by the 20 foot high wall of water.

Story continues, photo’s: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1366898/Japan-tsunami-earthquake-30-children-sit-silent-classroom-parents-vanish.html#ixzz1H8mGWmUQ

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4 comments on “Sitting silent in their classroom, the 30 children whose parents have not come to collect them after tsunami swept away their town

    • Aloha Isaac!

      Thank you for your enthusiastic support! The best way to contact me for the time being is just like this, I have to approve comments before they get posted so if you want to send a private message be sure to indicate that in your email and I won’t publish it. Right now there are so many emails coming into my personal acct (mostly spam) that there’s a good chance it won’t even get opened if I don’t recognize your name. So please feel free to send info or comment, I love the feedback and the interpersonal nature of blogging. To be honest, I set this blog up as a way to archive all the earth changes that i noticed were taking place and also a way to reach out to people who were interested in learning these things…since it seemed like I was just spamming everyone on my buddy list. Guess it was when I sent out info that the island of Indonesia had sunk 20ft in some places and not one person out of 30+ replied back, that’s a pretty amazing event that doesn’t happen everyday…or even lifetime! And people seem to be snoozing through it all….In La’kech, Annette

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