Number of dead pigs flooding Shanghai river rises to nearly 6,000


Chinese officials maintain that the drinking water is still safe despite the surge in swine found in the city’s Huangpu River. The carcasses are believed to have been dumped by farmers following police efforts to halt the illegal trade of pork products from diseased pigs.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tuesday, March 12, 2013, 3:10 PM
A dead pig floats on the river Monday, March 11, 2013 on the outskirts of Shanghai, China. A recent surge in the dumping of dead pigs upstream from Shanghai - with more than 2,800 carcasses floating into the financial hub through Monday - has followed a police campaign to curb the illicit trade in sick pig parts. (AP Photo)

AP

The Shanghai government announced on Tuesday that some 5,916 swine carcasses have been pulled from the Huangpu River.

BEIJING — The number of dead pigs found floating in a river flowing into Shanghai has reached nearly 6,000.

The Shanghai municipal government said in an online announcement that 5,916 swine carcasses had been retrieved from Huangpu River by 3 p.m. Tuesday, but added that municipal water remains safe.

PIGS13N_5_WEB

Eugene Hoshiko/AP

City officials say the municipal drinking water is still safe to consume.

The surge in the dumping of dead pigs – believed to be from pig farms in the upstream Jiaxing area in the neighboring Zhejiang province – has followed police campaigns to curb the illicit trade of pork products harvested from diseased pigs.

Shanghai authorities said the city has taken proper measures to safely dispose of the pig carcasses and that the city’s water plants are stepping up efforts to disinfect public water and testing for six common swine viruses.

PIGS13N_4_WEB

AP

Officials believe the carcasses were dumped by farmers in a neighboring province.

The Shanghai government reported no major swine epidemic, widespread pig deaths or dumping of pigs within the city boundaries of Shanghai.

The state-run China News news agency said Monday that Zhejiang province had reported no swine epidemic but that a provincial agriculture official blamed cold weather for the deaths of the pigs.

PIGS13N_3_WEB

Eugene Hoshiko/AP

Authorities check the dead pigs, not seen, which have been pulled out from the river on Monday.

The official, who was identified only by his family name Gu, told China News that the practice of dumping dead pigs into rivers lingers among some pig farmers in the city of Jiaxing. “We are still introducing the practice of collecting dead pigs,” Gu was quoted as saying.

Shanghai authorities have been pulling out the swollen and rotting pigs, some with their internal organs visible, since Friday – and revolting images of the carcasses in news reports and online blogs have raised public ire against local officials.

Beijing-based writer Li Mingsheng expressed shock when he learned of the latest number of dead pigs in Shanghai.

“This is not only an environmental issue but also a public moral problem,” Li wrote. “What’s been polluted is not only Shanghai’s river water but also the spirit of our country people.”
Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/world/number-dead-pigs-floating-shanghai-river-rises-6-000-article-1.1286389#ixzz2NPNSv000

Note: The real elephant in the room: What killed all these pigs? I saw mention of a suspected swine virus, which doesn’t make any sense unless it’s an airborne plague that has 9000 pigs dropping dead within day’s of each other.  From what I’ve learned thru researching Earth changes, it sounds like farmers are having problems with massive hydrogen sulfide releases into the environment. See jumpingjackhypothesis.blogspot.comfor more information and preventative measures.

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One comment on “Number of dead pigs flooding Shanghai river rises to nearly 6,000

  1. Pingback: China pulls nearly 6,000 dead pigs from Shanghai river | Free PR Online

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