SOTT Earth Changes Summary – September 2015: Extreme Weather, Planetary Upheaval, Meteor Fireballs


It’s also very important at this time, to stay well grounded to the Earth Mother. Make it part of your daily routine send out feelings of love, gratitude, praise, calmness, peace, serenity and conscious evolution to the planetary collective of nature spirits, elementals, ancestral spirits and human souls.
We are the ONES Gaia has been waiting for, let’s get busy holding sacred space for Earth changes to manifest as safely as possible for all living BEings.
All my love, blessings and aloha! Annette
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Comment: Please note that due to planetary/climate chaos increasing month by month, we can only show a limited selection of global events. Considering that these ‘localized’ events, multiplied many times over, are occurring simultaneously all over the planet, the scale of destruction and impact on people’s lives becomes almost unimaginable.

Image

© Sott.net

No matter the season or ‘normal’ climate, these days vehicles, homes and people are being washed away in deluges – the world over – on a regular basis. Forget “one month’s average rainfall falling within hours” – last month, TWO MONTHS’ average rainfall fell within a day and turned parts of southern Japan into inland seas. In the US, Utah experienced its worst ever flash-flooding, and the entire Eastern Seaboard was soaked with up to a foot of rain. This month, we also have clips of deluges in Spain, France, Italy, Greece, Turkey, Norway, Thailand, Taiwan, China, Sierra Leone, and New Zealand.

Violent volcanic eruptions in Japan, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Indonesia foreshadowed a massive 8.3 magnitude earthquake off Chile, which sent a 4.5 meter tsunami crashing into the coast and causing widespread damage. Hailstones the size of footballs fell in Naples, Italy. Brisbane, Australia, was buried in up to 4 inches (8cm) of hail, while a gigantic hole opened up on a nearby beach and swallowed a campsite. The rate of meteor fireball sightings continues to increase; in September there were spectacular sightings over Bangkok and Los Angeles.

Image

© Sott.net

Wildfires continue burning up much of California, which last month saw its ‘third-largest’ wildfire in history as whole towns were consumed and tens of thousands of residents were forced to flee. The other major outbreak of wildfires on the planet in September occurred in Indonesia, from where a smoky haze enveloped much of southeast Asia for the second time in three years. ‘Slash-and-burn’ farming is being blamed, but the fires occur in peatlands that release lots of methane, leaving us wondering if the primary fuel source for these fires is coming up from below.

Extreme weather also hit the Middle East, which was engulfed in an ‘unprecedented’ sandstorm that stretched from Iraq to Cyprus and south to Saudi Arabia. A tragic and incredibly symbolic event occurred in the heart of Islam’s ‘holy city’ on the 14th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, when a powerful and unusual thunderstorm descended on Mecca and winds blew a large construction crane belonging to Bin Laden Construction onto the Grand Mosque. 111 people were killed and hundreds more injured.

These were the signs of the times in September 2015…

Music used: ‘Escape from the Temple‘ by Per Kiilstofte. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International

To understand what’s going on, check out our book explaining how all these events are part of a natural climate shift, and why it’s taking place now: Earth Changes and the Human-Cosmic Connection.

Check out previous installments in this series – now translated into multiple languages – and more videos from SOTT Media here, here, or here.

You can help us chronicle the Signs of the Times by sending video suggestions to sott@sott.net

Signs of Change, June 2014


Widespread disaster continue all around the globe as our climate unleashes relentless extremes breaking records and destroying homes and lives..
Freak, rare and extreme weather events has taken place the past month or so….

Thanks for watching and stay safe..

So much more has happen then this video shows because a lot has gone unreported. Please visit my facebook page for much more..
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Hawkke…

A thanks to all my sources around the world that share with me daily 🙂

Signs Of Change The Past Week Or So ~ May 2014



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yqKcbDIyKdw

Signs Of Change For July 2013


With the month of July ending I decided to upload this video in dramatic fashion for the last one of this eventful month. Please feel free to download and share this series if you like them, just remember to leave credit. Also check out the new channel by 2011message called 2013message to continue following his series 2013 Is Strange, find it here http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnf7M…

Thanks for watching here and stay safe!

Week 4

Week 3

Week 2 (re-run 🙂

Week 1

Signs Of Change The Past Week…Or So ~ July 2013 Part 2


This is the first I’ve seen of underground fires erupting, which could mean that as the Earth continues to expand there are areas where rising magma is getting very close to the surface. It’s kind of hard to tell, but it looks like you can see the magma through one of the openings in the ground.  How will these fires interact with rising methane and hydrogen sulfide gases, and are the two related? Should be the next logical question…

 

Signs Of Change, Mid April – May 8, 2013


Wow! Gaia is really wreaking havoc, what’s really incredible is considering the massive flooding, a dam breaking, the large earthquakes and volcanic activity taking place in some of the poorest parts of the world, “relatively” few lives appear to have been lost.

Naturally my prayers go out to all the families have who lost loved ones, but when you take a look at the sheer volume of destruction in some places, IMO the death toll could’ve been considerably higher. For instance, tornado’s in Italy are rare, people there likely haven’t been taught how to take cover and stay safe in tornadic conditions; in addition, there weren’t any sirens to forewarn people in the tornado’s path either.

Earths management team has a good handle on assisting Gaia and her children through the shift with with as little loss of life as possible. Fortunately, we’re a resilient race and can be quite resourceful when faced with crisis, and lucky survivors when confronting danger. There’s no reason for fear, we’re always right where we’re supposed to be…

Also, I think it was in the second video that a helicopter cameraman catches footage of Saturn’s rings from his camera!! Very cool..

Here’s the last three weeks of “Signs of Change”…

Published on May 8, 2013

HawkkeyDavisChannel HawkkeyDavisChannel

The weather all around this planet has gone crazy this week!
Floods, wildfires, dead fish, meteors, record breaking snow storms and so much more has taking place the past week or so. Thanks for watching here and stay safe!

*Music Used*
Audio Network – Solar Eclipse

This video only shows 70% of what has actual taking place this week. For more from this week and others in the furute like my channel on Facebook.
Thank you all for sharing with me on FB, join us here
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Hawkkey…

Watch More Of This Series From The Playlist
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…

Published on May 1, 2013

Signs Of Change, April 2013 Part 4

HawkkeyDavisChannel HawkkeyDavisChannel

Floods, earthquakes, meteorites crashing into houses and more has taking place the past week or so.
If you think that I’ve missed a few events you’re right. With summer getting close I don’t have the time to do alot of research. I might change this series to every two week soon so I can keep giving you some great videos with lots of info and events. I’ll keep you guys posted on that. Thanks for watching here and stay safe!

*Music Used*
Vlado Hudec — Revelations

Published on Apr 23, 2013

Signs Of Change, April 2013 Part 3

Powerful eartquakes, sandstorms, major flooding and fireballs falling from the sky has taking place the past week or so..

*Music Used*
Switch Trailer Music — Castaway

Earthquake Updates
http://www.youtube.com/user/MegaFight…

Thank you all for sharing with me on FB, join us here
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Hawkkey…

Watch More Of This Series From The Playlist
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…

I do not own any of these videos thanks to all the people who film these disasters and the news medias that report them.
FAIR USE NOTICE: This video may contain copyrighted material. Such material is made available for educational purposes only. This constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in Title 17 U.S.C. section 107 of the US Copyright Law.

Signs Of Change The Past Week Or So Until Jan. 15th, 2013


Published on Jan 15, 2013

Extreme weather events carry on here in 2013. Earthquakes, flooding strange noise phenomenon, record highs and lows and much more has taking place the past week or so. For more on these events go to or subscribe to my channel. Thanks for watching here and be safe!

Music Used
Track 1
The Secession — Ash

Track 2
Hit The House — Radium

Good Sources For Strange Booms
The Juniper Chronicles
http://www.youtube.com/user/joonipuur

And EnigmaSeeker2012’s channel
http://www.youtube.com/user/EnigmaSeeker2012?feature=watch

Check Out More Chnnels On My Page For Other Great Sources
Or The Weird Weather Group On FB
facebook.com/groups/WeirdWeath­er/

Playlist For More Of These Videos
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLOWK8j-EoBe5dobtTpAXXRrfuhwrQUK83&f…

A massive dust storm hit Onslow as Tropical Cyclone Narelle draws desert sand off land out into the Indian Ocean


Posted on January 12, 2013

Tropical Cyclone Narelle is spinning out to sea west of Western Australia as it reached Category 3 status with wind gusts near center at 285 km/h (177 mph). Narelle is moving slightly southwestward and will maintain that bearing for the next few days before heading due south and rounding the continent’s southwest in the coming days. The storm’s bands to the southeast are drawing desert sand off land out into the Indian Ocean. Meanwhile, Australia is battering with catastrophic bushfires after unprecedented record-high temperatures. The high temperatures and dryness of the region create prime conditions for fires.   According to latest Joint Typhoon...

Tropical Cyclone Narelle is spinning out to sea west of Western Australia as it reached Category 3 status with wind gusts near center at 285 km/h (177 mph). Narelle is moving slightly southwestward and will maintain that bearing for the next few days before heading due south and rounding the continent’s southwest in the coming days. The storm’s bands to the southeast are drawing desert sand off land out into the Indian Ocean. Meanwhile, Australia is battering with catastrophic bushfires after unprecedented record-high temperatures. The high temperatures and dryness of the region create prime conditions for fires.

This image was taken by the NASA/NOAA Suomi NPP satellite’s VIIRS instrument around 05:40 UTC on January 11, 2013. (Credit: NOAA/NNVL)

According to latest Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC), TC Narelle is located approximately 335 nm north-northwest of Learmonth, Australia and is moving west-southwestward at speed of 6 knots. Narelle is tracking along the northwestern periphery of a deep-layered subtropical ridge anchored over south-central Australia. Narelle has peaked in intensity and should gradually weaken mainly due to increasing vertical wind shear and cooling sea surface temperatures.

TC Narelle forecast track (Credit: JTWC)

According to latest report by Australian Bureau of Meteorology (BoM), severe Tropical Cyclone Narelle is expected to continue moving to the south to southwest and pass west of the Northwest Cape over the weekend. Gales with gusts to 100 kilometres per hour could develop in coastal areas between Mardie and Exmouth during Saturday, then extend south to Cape Cuvier later on Saturday. On Sunday gales may extend south to Denham and winds along the west Pilbara coast should ease from the east later in the day. Thunderstorm activity in western parts of the Pilbara could be squally with isolated heavy falls. This activity will extend into far northwestern Gascoyne over the weekend.

TC Narelle captured by MODIS/Terra satellite at 02:40 UTC on January 11, 2013 (Credit: LANCE/MODIS)

Tides along the west Pilbara coast are likely to rise above the normal high tide mark Saturday morning and again Saturday night with flooding of low-lying coastal areas possible. Higher than normal tides should extend along the west coast later Saturday and into early next week.

Huge dust storm hit Onslow

Huge swathes of sand and dust (possibly from the dry parts of Western Australia’s Great Sandy Desert, Gibson Desert and Tanami Desert), pulled by strong winds in the Indian Ocean, dropped near the town of Onslow  in the Pilbara region, in  northwestern Australia. Ships at the sea were dwarfed by the huge cloud of dust. Reports from tugboat workers said that visibility was reduced to just 100 metres and the swell rose to two metres.

In 18 years of meteorology, I’ve never seen a white shelf cloud capping the brownish dirt from the haboob.  If there was a hall of fame for weather photos, this one would get in on the first ballot.“ Jonathan Erdman, meteorologist for The Weather Channel

However, according to ABM’s manager of climate services Glenn Cook, the dust storm was not directly related to the cyclone – the centre of which is still hundreds of kilometres away. Wind gusts in Onslow reached 101.3 km/h (63 mph) and the dust storm was made worse by the lack of rain in the region. Wind and rain caused the storm to dump the sand and dust it had ingested while passing Onslow. Steve Brooks, from Perth Weather Live said the bright red colour in the storm is unrelated to the massive bush fires across Australia this week. Instead, the red dust and iron ore which covers the Pilbara region are believed to have caused the vivid colour.

 

Some images of spectacular dust storm over Onslow on January 11, 2013 (Credits: Michael Hayes/Will Simmons/Brett Martin)

Dust storms are quiet common phenomenon in arid and semi-arid regions. Loose sand and dirt from a dry surface are blown by the strong winds and transported from one place and deposits it in another. Particles become loosely held mainly due to drought or arid conditions. Drought and wind contribute to the emergence of dust storms, as do poor farming and grazing practices by exposing the dust and sand to the wind. Dust storms can carry large amounts of dust, with the leading edge being composed of solid wall of dust as much as 1.6 km (0.99 miles) high.

On September 23,2009  a dust storm that started in South Australia and inland New South Wales, Australia, blanketed New South Wales with reddish-orange skies. It stretched as far north as southern Queensland and as far east as New Zealand. Another huge dust storm, originating in the Mallee region of Victoria, Australia covered the city of Melbourne on February 8, 1983.

Comparison of two large dust storms in Australia – Onslow, January 11, 2013 (left) and Fregon Community, February 8, 2009 (right) (Credits: Will Simmons/BiteTheDust)

 

The Australian region tropical cyclone season runs from 1 November to 30 April. Cyclones sometimes occur outside this period, mainly in the Central Indian Ocean southwest of Sumatra.

 

Radar

Satellite Animations

http://thewatchers.adorraeli.com/2013/01/12/onslow-dust-storm-australia-narelle/

 

Billion-dollar weather disasters smash US record


The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration added two disasters to the list Wednesday, bringing the total to 12. The two are wildfires in Texas, New Mexico and Arizona and the mid-June tornadoes and severe weather. – Reuters Photo

WASHINGTON: America smashed the record for billion-dollar weather disasters this year with a deadly dozen, and counting.

With an almost biblical onslaught of twisters, floods, snow, drought, heat and wildfire, the U.S. in 2011 has seen more weather catastrophes that caused at least $1 billion in damage than it did in all of the 1980s, even after the dollar figures from back then are adjusted for inflation.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration added two disasters to the list Wednesday, bringing the total to 12. The two are wildfires in Texas, New Mexico and Arizona and the mid-June tornadoes and severe weather.

NOAA uses $1 billion as a benchmark for the worst weather disasters.

Extreme weather in America this year has killed more than 1,000 people, according to National Weather Service Director Jack Hayes. The dozen billion-dollar disasters alone add up to $52 billion.

The old record for $1 billion disasters was nine, in 2008.

Hayes, a meteorologist since 1970, said he has never seen a year for extreme weather like this, calling it “the deadly, destructive and relentless 2011.”

This year’s total may not stop at 12. Officials are still adding up the damage from the Tropical Storm Lee and the pre-Halloween Northeast snowstorm, and so far each is at $750 million. And there’s still nearly a month left in the year.

Scientists blame an unlucky combination of global warming and freak chance. They say even with the long-predicted increase in weather extremes triggered by manmade climate change, 2011 in the US was wilder than they had predicted. For example, the six large outbreaks of tornadoes cannot be attributed to global warming, scientists say.

“The degree of devastation is extreme in and of itself, and it would be tempting to say it’s a sign of things to come, though we would be hard-pressed to see such a convergence of circumstances occurring in one single year again for a while,” said Jerry Meehl, a climate scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado.

Another factor in the rising number of billion-dollar calamities: “More people and more stuff in harm’s way,” such as in coastal areas, said NOAA Administrator Jane Lubchenco.

“What we’re seeing this year is not just an anomalous year, but a harbinger of things to come,” with heat waves, droughts and other extreme weather, Lubchenco said Wednesday at an American Geophysical Union science conference in San Francisco.

The number of weather catastrophes that pass the billion-dollar mark when adjusted into constant dollars is increasing with each decade. In the 1980s, the country averaged slightly more than one a year. In the 1990s, it was 3.8 a year. It jumped to 4.6 in the first decade of this century. And in the past two years, it has averaged 7.5.

Other years had higher overall damage figures because of one gargantuan disaster, such as Hurricane Katrina in 2005 and a 1988 drought.

But this is not just about numbers.

“Each of these events is a huge disaster for victims who experience them,” Lubchenco said in an email. “They are an unprecedented challenge for the nation.”

Half the billion-dollar disasters were tornado outbreaks in one of the deadliest years on record. More than 540 people were killed in those six tragedies. In four days in April, there were 343 tornadoes in the largest outbreak on record, including 199 in one day, which is another record.

Texas had more than a million acres burned by wildfire, a record for the state, and Oklahoma set a record for the hottest month ever in the United States. The Ohio River Valley had triple the normal rainfall, which caused major flooding along the Mississippi River.

“Too little water in the South, too much water in the North,” said Andrew Weaver, a climate scientist at the University of Victoria in Canada. “It’s a story we are hearing more and more often.”

That’s why the world has to do two things, said Princeton University geological sciences professor Michael Oppenheimer: try to slow global warming by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and prepare better for extreme weather.

http://www.dawn.com/2011/12/08/billion-dollar-weather-disasters-smash-us-record.html

Do You Now Understand Why You Need To Prepare For Emergencies? This Has Been The Worst Year For Natural Disasters In U.S. History


The Economic Collapse Blog
Fri, 09 Sep 2011 00:08 CDT

There has been a natural disaster that has caused at least a billion dollars of damage inside the United States every single month so far this year. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, there have been 10 major disasters in the United States this year. On average, usually there are only about 3 major disasters a year. At this point, disasters are happening inside the United States so frequently that there seems to be no gap between them. We just seem to go from one major disaster to the next. Last year, FEMA declared an all-time record of 81 disasters inside the United States. This year, we are on pace for well over 100. We just got done dealing with Hurricane Irene, and now we are dealing with historic wildfires in Texas and unprecedented flooding up in the northeast part of the country. This has been the worst year for natural disasters in U.S. history, and we still have nearly four months left to go. Hopefully after everything that has happened this year it has become abundantly clear to all of us why we need to prepare for emergencies. The world is becoming an increasingly unstable place, and you never know what is going to happen next.

Thankfully, the U.S. has not experienced a disaster on the level of Hurricane Katrina so far this year, but what makes this year different is that we have never seen so many major disasters happen so rapidly. Since the beginning of the year we have had to deal with record-setting winter storms, nightmarish tornadoes, “once in a century” earthquakes, historic flooding all over the country, severe drought and some of the worst wildfires the U.S. has ever experienced.

Is there a reason why the United States is being hit by major disaster after major disaster or is all of this just a really unfortunately coincidence? The following are just a few of the nightmarish natural disasters that the U.S. has had to deal with so far this year…..

Texas Wildfires

At this point, the state of Texas has been on fire for nearly 300 consecutive days. This has been the worst wildfire season that Texas has ever experienced.

So far, an astounding 3.6 million acres has been burned. Vast stretches of Texas have been transformed into desolate wastelands.

Over the past week alone, the Texas Forest Service has responded to more than 180 new fires. The incredibly dry weather and the scorching temperatures have combined to turn the state of Texas into a tinderbox.

One massive wildfire near Austin, Texas has burned approximately 1,400 homes and continues to spread. The state desperately needs rain and it needs it now.

To get an idea of just how fast the fires in Texas are spreading, just watch this video.

Historic Drought

Right now, approximately 81 percent of the state of Texas is experiencing “exceptional drought” conditions. Not only has this created an ideal environment for wildfires, it is also absolutely crippling ranchers and farmers.

Farmers in Texas have lost over half of the cotton crop so far. This is likely to cause clothing prices to rise substantially in the months ahead.

Ranchers in Texas have been forced to slaughter huge numbers of cattle because the drought has made it incredibly difficult to feed them. Sadly, the number of U.S. cattle is now down to its lowest level since 1963.

You might want to stock up on beef. In the coming months the price of beef is likely to go significantly higher.

It is hard to describe just how bad things are down in Texas right now. Overall, it is estimated that the drought has caused more than $5 billion in damage to the agricultural industry so far.

But wait, there is more bad news. In fact, if things don’t improve soon we could see massive problems with winter wheat. Just check out what an article recently posted on Yahoo news had to say….

The bad news does not stop there. Winter-wheat-planting season runs from September through October and rain is vital to germination. Texas and Oklahoma produce almost a third of winter wheat in the U.S. – the hard wheat used in bread products. This week, Bloomberg financial news quoted wheat economists predicting a 50% jump in winter-wheat prices. If the dearth of rain continues and there is no moisture in the soil to germinate the wheat, prices could climb higher still.

Flooding In The Northeast

We just got done with Hurricane Irene, and now Tropical Storm Lee is dumping huge amounts of rain all over the northeast United States. In fact, there has been so much rain up in Pennsylvania that more than 100,000 people were evacuated from the Wilkes-Barre area on Thursday because of rising waters on the Susquehanna River.

Rivers and creeks all over Pennsylvania, New York and New Jersey are flooding. The region desperately needs a break from rain, but it does not look like that is going to happen quite yet.

The big problem is that many of these areas had already been hit really hard by Hurricane Irene. As a result of Hurricane Irene, millions of people lost power and dozens of people lost their lives. Hurricane Irene caused the worst flooding that Vermont had experienced since 1927, and the total economic damage from Irene could reach as high as $16 billion.

Now there are three more storms in the Atlantic that we will have to keep an eye on. Hopefully Tropical Storm Nate, Tropical Storm Maria and Hurricane Katia will not cause major problems, but with the way this year has been going you never know what is going to happen.

Disturbing Earthquakes

As I have written about previously, the number of major earthquakes around the globe is significantly increasing. Back in 2001, the world had 1361 earthquakes of magnitude-5.0 or greater. This year, we are on pace to have over 2800, which would be the highest number this decade by far.

Just a couple of weeks ago, the U.S. experienced two of the weirdest earthquakes that it has seen in ages. The earthquake in Virginia that made headlines all over the nation is being called a “once a century” earthquake. The east coast very rarely sees anything like this happen.

Continued here:

http://www.sott.net/articles/show/234943-Do-You-Now-Understand-Why-You-Need-To-Prepare-For-Emergencies-This-Has-Been-The-Worst-Year-For-Natural-Disasters-In-U-S-History

This 6 part video illustrates natural disasters from 2011, including new footage never seen before…

2011 Year of Record Breaking Weather Extremes


(NaturalNews)

Bizarre reports of weather extremes continue to come in from all over the world. As the northern hemisphere bakes in record breaking heat the southern half of our earth is suffering record breaking cold. In South Africa, for instance they have just experienced one of the worst storms and extreme weather conditions with snow and ice in areas never seen before. A week of the COLDEST freezing weather in 100 years has created a national emergency with roads closed everywhere with thousands of motorists stranded.

Dreadful Combination of Man and Nature

Russel Mead writes, “Politics, economics, international relations, religion: Everything in our world is getting weirder, and the weirding is happening faster all the time. This change is rapidly propelling us into a century that will be radically different from everything humanity has known before. We have all been given tickets on the wildest rollercoaster ride in the history of Planet Earth. Our governing classes, our academics, our journalists, and our professionals mostly hate this and, with eyes firmly fixed in the rear view mirror, try to pretend that the world of the 20th century can never, will never break up.”

Climate catastrophes, harvest failures, droughts, dust and firestorms are raining misery on an increasingly unstable earth. What do we expect when our entire planet has shifted on its axis and unexplainable increases in gamma radiation are being detected, both affecting the weather? Everything is changing around us; even thousands of miles beneath our feet the earth is rumbling loudly with a record number of volcanoes now in various stages of eruption. Floods, tornadoes,earthquakes, tsunamis and other extreme weather have left a trail of destruction during the first half in 2011.

There were jaw-dropping heat indexes — measured as
a combination of temperature and humidity — across the
Midwest.It felt like 131 degrees in Knoxville, in central
Iowa, and 124 in Freeport, Ill., the Weather Service said.

These “extreme weather” events will become more numerous and deadly as   the planet become more and more unstable. The sheer force of Nature is increasing (for some reason) and she is deadly, often striking without warning. In the space of hours or even minutes, in the case of tornadoes, unbridled forces   obliterate everything man has created.It’s time to face the fact that the weather has changed dramatically in a very short period of time and it’s threatening to spin out of control.

In Chicago those looking for some kind of a break from the heat of the last week got it overnight — a rainstorm that dropped temperatures into the low 70s. But like the heat wave that preceded it, this rainstorm was anything but ordinary. According to ChicagoWeatherCenter.com, the total rainfall at O’Hare — 6.91 inches as of about 6:50 a.m. — is since records began in 1871.-Chicago Tribune

Reports of these kinds of storms have been pouring in from all around the world. Some people are calling them  cloud burst storms, which are very intense thunderstorms. In many instances these storms appear to come out of nowhere. Most of them develop late at night where the atmosphere has been heated by record daytime temperatures.They are characterized by very intense lightning strikes. Some unleash hailstones and monstrous amounts of rainfall that often lead to dramatic flash-flooding events like we witness in the video below where we actually see, to our horror, people getting swept away by a very sudden flood.

Videoatalpani Accident, Indore India (Live)

Climate change is dramatically increasing the scale of natural disasters threatening world security as predicted years ago by a 2007 Pentagon study. Though science cannot yet explain all the reasons behind the radical changes in the world’s climate, “a changing climate is a reality,” and one that effects all sectors of society, said Achim Steiner, director of the U.N. Environment Program.

While Chicago dealt with too much water, Arkansas was preparing for forest fires due to drought. Fires have been burning down millions of acres around the world. Some 40,000 wildfires have torched over 5.8 million in the United States alone and conditions threaten to worsen through the summer months.

The hot weather in the nation’s breadbasket also posed a threat to farmers’ top cash crop,corn, as it enters its key growth stage of pollination. The wet spring led to late planting of corn, and dry hot weather was adding concerns. “Right now we are seeing real stress in the corn plants,” said Mark White, adviser to the Missouri Corn Growers Association. Drought, unlike earthquakes, hurricanes and other rapid-moving weather, could become a permanent condition in some regions.

Temperatures in many states have spiked to more than 100 degrees for days at a stretch. And the day of dust storms is suddenly back as dryness overtakes much of the country. Dozens of wildfires raged across much of northwestern Ontario on the weekend as hot, dry weather swept the province, leaving forests tinder-dry. The provincial Ministry of Natural Resources says there are 92 active fires burning in the remote northwestern region.

Floods

Overnight rains dumped nearly seven inches of rain on Chicago
early Saturday, breaking a record for the city, canceling flights,
and causing parts of highways and train lines to shut down.

July 18, 2011 – SCOTLAND- A flash flood created havoc for residents and businesses in Perth by turning streets into rivers. About a foot of water collected in some places around East Bridge Street during the one-hour downpour. Chris McCulloch, 44, said: “I’ve never seen rain like it in Scotland. All the streets coming down off the hill turned into streams.” -BBC

July 13, 2011 – CANADA- Heavy rains in central Alberta caused flooding in the town of Eckville Monday. “People are just kind of dumbstruck,” resident Sharon Walker said. “We have had washouts of roads. Some people have got 10 to 14 inches of water in their basements …we’ve never seen anything like it.” On the same day we saw flash flood sin New Brighton Minnesota burying people and cars waist-high in water.

July 12, 2011 – NIGERIA- Lagos experiences 178 mm of rain in 18 hours. It was destructive, but the rains will boost harvest. The Sunday heavy downpour that continued up until yesterday has thrown some families into mourning as no fewer than ten persons lost their lives in the accompanying floods. Last Sunday Lagos experienced a torrential downpour that literally grounded the entire city, sacking homes and paralyzing economic activities. – Business Day

July 10, 2011 – SEOUL, (Yonhap) – At least eight people were killed and four were missing after torrential rains hit southern parts of South Korea over the weekend, emergency officials said Sunday. Since Friday, as much as 40 centimeters of rain has fallen in South Gyeongsang and Jeolla provinces,leaving tens of thousands of hectares of farm land submerged and nearly 90 homes flooded. -Yonhap News

July 22, 2011 – PYONGYANG (BNO NEWS) – Heavy rains and resulting landslides last week have caused widespread damage in parts of North Korea. Some areas received more than 400 millimeters (15.7 inches) of rain. “Footage from other regions showed flooded fields and damaged crops. Landslides in Sunchon, Tokchon and Pukchang destroyed bridges and railways, scores of homes, public buildings, roads, and tens of thousands of hectares of farmland. Dozens of coal mines were also flooded throughout the country.” – Irish Weather Online

It’s not just extreme weather but changes in an areas basic climate that is concerning people. For instance lengths of winter, summer and rainy seasons in Bangladesh have increased, while spring has decreased, changes that are likely to have an adverse impact on agriculture, said a study based on farmers’ perceptions. Winter, traditionally around two-and-a-half months long, now prevails for three-and-three-quarters, while summer takes five months, almost double the past usual length. On the other hand, rainy season, normally two-and-three-quarters, prevails for around three-and-a-half months, while spring is now one-and-a-half months, nearly half a month less than before.

Record Hot and Cold

North Korea’s food shortage has reached a crisis
point this year, aid workers say, largely because
of shocks to the agricultural sector, including
torrential rains and the coldest winter in 60 years.

Just when it is hottest and we are totally convinced that global warming is not just a hallucination we get a report urging motorists in Europe to pre-order cold-weather tires because next winter will “break all records” in terms of snowfall and freezing temperatures…. Specialist long-range forecaster James Madden, of Exacta Weather, correctly predicted the harsh conditions experienced over the last two years and gave his forecast. He warns: “The U.K. is to brace itself for well-below-average temperatures and widespread heavy snowfall throughout winter 2011/2012 which will result in the fourth bad winter in succession, and will prove to be the worst of them all. “I fully expect records to be broken, with the Highlands of Scotland being once again particularly hard hit. It is vital to start preparing now.”

You might have thought not too much out of the ordinary about these super storms if you have not lived through one yet. Lightening striking down from the heavens from these storms is killing unusual numbers of people and a few days ago we had a lightning strike actually cause thederailment of a trainin China. We have heard of planes having problems occasionally with lightening, but trains?

Conclusion

The weather has changed dramatically in a very short period of time. One has to be almost brain-dead to not get the implications to our civilization as the world’s climate careens out of control. We can’t say we did not have any warning but no one alive saw how violent the weather would turn out to be in this first half of 2011. In 2007, NASA scientists also developed a new climate model that indicated that the most violent severe storms and tornadoes may become more common.

The media has been falling all over itself denying any connection between these historic, violent storms and climate change. Most meteorologists have been claiming the storms have been due to an out-of-place jet stream. The sun has been in a low activity phase so something else has to be the cause of warming even as we suffer through cooling due to diminished solar output. So the question remains, what is causing our violent weather?

http://networkedblogs.com/l6ylD

The nine billion-dollar weather disasters of 2011 (so far)


Published: 4:55 AM GMT on August 02, 2011
It’s been an unprecedented year for weather disasters in the United States, with the dangerous portion of hurricane season still to come. We’ve already seen nine billion-dollar weather disasters so far in 2011. The National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) June disaster report estimates that, through May, 2011 is the costliest year since they began tracking billion-dollar disasters in 1980. The cost of the disasters through May could be as high as $32 billion, compared to a typical year-to-date cost of $6 billion. 2011 to-date now ties the entire year of 2008 for the most billion-dollar weather disasters in one year. Of course, this number could go up if we see some hurricane landfalls this year.

Here are NCDC’s estimates of the top-end damages from 2011’s billion-dollar weather disasters so far:

Missouri River Flooding
Snowfall was abnormally heavy in the Rocky Mountains of Montana and Wyoming this past winter (over 200% of average), and record rains fell over the Upper Midwest this Spring, the effects of which continue to be felt along the Missouri River. In May, the Army Corps of engineers began releasing a record amount of water through the dams above Gavins Point, including the Garrison Dam in Central North Dakota. The flooding has kept many bridges closed, making it impossible to cross the river for a hundred miles at a time in some places.

Texas Drought & Wildfires
Texas is in the midst of one of the worst droughts of its history. As of June 28, 2011, 91% of Texas was in extreme or greater drought, and 47% of the state was in an “exceptional drought,” the most severe category. In April and May of 2011, wildfires burned over 3 million acres across the state. The governor of Texas, Rick Perry, has declared a State of Disaster every month since December 2010. As of June 16, NCDC estimates that the drought and fires in Texas have cost $3.0 billion—an amount that is likely to rise as the event continues.

Mississippi River Flooding
Between the spring snow-melt and two storms that dumped massive amounts of rain in the Mississippi watershed in April, the Mississippi was in for a flood of record proportions. The river began to bulge by the beginning of May, flooding every state from Illinois to Louisiana and Mississippi. A federal disaster was declared by the President in Kentucky, Tennessee, and Mississippi. In an effort to save Baton Rouge and New Orleans, Louisiana, the Army Corps of Engineers opened the Morganza Spillway on May 14, which flooded 4,600 square miles of Louisiana. The NCDC estimates $4 billion in damages from this flood, although the final amount might not be fully realized yet.

Mississippi River Flood 2011 Memphis
An overflowing Mississippi River at Memphis, Tennessee on May 8, 2011.

Midwest/Southeast Tornado Outbreak (May 22-27)
This six-day tornado outbreak killed approximately 180 people, and includes the EF-5 tornadoes that rolled through Joplin, Missouri on May 22, and El Reno, Oklahoma on May 24. Tornadoes in this storm were spawned from central Texas to the Upper Midwest. The whole event is estimated to have done $7 billion in damages.

2011 Super Outbreak (April 25-30)
Most of the tornadoes spawned in this storm happened in the Southeast, from Mississippi to Virginia, though a total of 334 tornadoes have been confirmed in 21 states from Texas to New York. April 27th, in particular, was a notably destructive and deadly day, as 188 tornadoes touched down in the Southeast, four of which were rated EF-5. The NCDC estimates that the Super Outbreak resulted in at least $5.5 billion in damages.

Mississippi River Flood 2011 Memphis
Just a portion of the aftermath from the EF-4 tornado that devastated Tuscaloosa, Alabama
on April 27, 2011. Image credit: Wikipedia

Midwest/Southeast Tornado Outbreak (April 14-16)
This storm generated at least 200 tornadoes across 16 states in mid-April, leading to 38 deaths. The system moved quickly from the Plains to the Mid-Atlantic, where the most notable tornado of the outbreak occurred near Raleigh, North Carolina. This tornado was rain-wrapped as it headed in the direction of Raleigh, and was later rated an EF-3. The NCDC estimates that this outbreak resulted in $2 billion in damages.

Southeast/Midwest Severe Storms (April 8-11)
Tornadoes were reported in Virginia and Iowa from April 8-11. A significant day of severe weather occurred on April 9th, as a powerful storm over the Upper Midwest spawned tornadoes in Iowa. The strongest of these tornadoes was the huge, 3/4 mile-wide tornado that plowed through the tiny town of Mapleton, Iowa on Saturday evening, leaving a trail of destruction 3.5 miles long. The tornado, preliminarily rated as an EF-3 with 136 – 165 mph winds, flattened 20% of the town of 1200 residents and damaged half of the buildings. The NCDC estimates that this weekend of severe weather caused $2.2 billion in damages.

Midwest/Southeast Severe Storms (April 4-5)
Damaging straight-line winds and tornadoes were spawned by a storm that pushed through the central U.S. in early April. Power outages were extensive across the southern and eastern U.S., and many people were killed by falling trees and branches. Tornadoes touched down in Arkansas, Kentucky, and Mississippi. 1,318 reports of damaging wind were submitted to local Weather Service offices on April 4th alone. The NCDC estimates that this tornado and wind event caused $2 billion in damages.

Groundhog Day Blizzard of 2011
This storm stretched from northeast Mexico to Canada, but is most memorable for its effect on Chicago, where 1-2 feet of snow fell, combined with winds over 60 mph which led to blizzard conditions. 21.2 inches of snow fell at Chicago O’Hare International Airport, making it the third largest snowfall total in Chicago history. Blizzard conditions were reported in many other large cities during the storm’s lifetime, including Oklahoma City, St. Louis, Detroit, Cleveland, and New York. This storm also brought ice and wintry mix as far south as Albuquerque, Dallas, and Houston. At least 36 deaths were caused by this storm, most of which were vehicle-related. NCDC estimates this storm did at least $3.9 billion in damage.

Chicago Blizzard 2011
The Windy City on February 1, 2011 during the Groundhog Day Blizzard.

NHC Invest 90L, Born Again

Invest 90L spiked in thunderstorm activity and circulation yesterday, leading NHC to re-invest the system. 90L is still south of Cuba moving ever-so-slowly to the west. While low level (850mb) circulation has increased since yesterday morning, the system is tilted southeast with height. This is likely due to the westerly wind shear it’s facing right now. As the system moves into the Gulf, shear will become more favorable (if there’s shear present, easterly is better than westerly). The wave is still moist and moisture is expected to remain high (4 to 5.5 g/kg specific humidity) as it tracks into the Gulf of Mexico.

Again this morning, none of the models are suggesting meaningful development of Invest 90L. However, the GFS (finally) has come around to resolving the circulation at all. Dr. Rob Carver and I spoke this morning, and we came to the conclusion that the lack of observations in this region, combined with the small size of the system, is causing the models to not have the best handle on the situation. The Hurricane Center has a Hurricane Hunter mission scheduled for 18z (2pm EDT) tomorrow, after which we could see the models starting to favor development again. Today the Hurricane Center is forecasting a 20% chance of development over the next 48 hours. I agree with that, but I also think that beyond 48 hours this wave is going to have a better shot at developing a closed circulation at the surface.

http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/article.html?entrynum=1856

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