NibiruMagick 2012’s Climate Change Update: Gulf Dead Zone Much Larger Than thought, San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station CA. (2 February 2012)



Uploaded by on Feb 1, 2012

The leak occurred in equipment that was installed in the plant in the fall of 2010. The leak occurred in one of thousands of tubes that carry radioactive water from the Unit 3 reactor.
However, the company has found damage to other tubes, Dricks said.
“The damage that they have found to many other tubes is unusual, and they are attempting to identify the reason,”
http://enenews.com/ap-radiation-could-have-escaped-nuke-plant-on-san-diego-co…

US: Researchers Discover Gulf Dead Zone Much Larger Than Previously Thought
http://www.sott.net/signs/list_by_category/4-The-Living-Planet?page=1

Powerful energy release emanating from the Earth’s core recorded?
http://theextinctionprotocol.wordpress.com/

Tropical Cyclone Iggy weakens before making landfall
http://thewatchers.adorraeli.com/

http://hisz.rsoe.hu/alertmap/index2.php

Report: ‘Empty’ Reactor No. 4 was actually filled with nuclear fuel — Only a matter of time before melt-out
http://enenews.com/

DON”T forget Zippcast (Uploaded fast tonight)
http://www.zippcast.com/user/NibiruMagick2012

The nine billion-dollar weather disasters of 2011 (so far)


Published: 4:55 AM GMT on August 02, 2011
It’s been an unprecedented year for weather disasters in the United States, with the dangerous portion of hurricane season still to come. We’ve already seen nine billion-dollar weather disasters so far in 2011. The National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) June disaster report estimates that, through May, 2011 is the costliest year since they began tracking billion-dollar disasters in 1980. The cost of the disasters through May could be as high as $32 billion, compared to a typical year-to-date cost of $6 billion. 2011 to-date now ties the entire year of 2008 for the most billion-dollar weather disasters in one year. Of course, this number could go up if we see some hurricane landfalls this year.

Here are NCDC’s estimates of the top-end damages from 2011’s billion-dollar weather disasters so far:

Missouri River Flooding
Snowfall was abnormally heavy in the Rocky Mountains of Montana and Wyoming this past winter (over 200% of average), and record rains fell over the Upper Midwest this Spring, the effects of which continue to be felt along the Missouri River. In May, the Army Corps of engineers began releasing a record amount of water through the dams above Gavins Point, including the Garrison Dam in Central North Dakota. The flooding has kept many bridges closed, making it impossible to cross the river for a hundred miles at a time in some places.

Texas Drought & Wildfires
Texas is in the midst of one of the worst droughts of its history. As of June 28, 2011, 91% of Texas was in extreme or greater drought, and 47% of the state was in an “exceptional drought,” the most severe category. In April and May of 2011, wildfires burned over 3 million acres across the state. The governor of Texas, Rick Perry, has declared a State of Disaster every month since December 2010. As of June 16, NCDC estimates that the drought and fires in Texas have cost $3.0 billion—an amount that is likely to rise as the event continues.

Mississippi River Flooding
Between the spring snow-melt and two storms that dumped massive amounts of rain in the Mississippi watershed in April, the Mississippi was in for a flood of record proportions. The river began to bulge by the beginning of May, flooding every state from Illinois to Louisiana and Mississippi. A federal disaster was declared by the President in Kentucky, Tennessee, and Mississippi. In an effort to save Baton Rouge and New Orleans, Louisiana, the Army Corps of Engineers opened the Morganza Spillway on May 14, which flooded 4,600 square miles of Louisiana. The NCDC estimates $4 billion in damages from this flood, although the final amount might not be fully realized yet.

Mississippi River Flood 2011 Memphis
An overflowing Mississippi River at Memphis, Tennessee on May 8, 2011.

Midwest/Southeast Tornado Outbreak (May 22-27)
This six-day tornado outbreak killed approximately 180 people, and includes the EF-5 tornadoes that rolled through Joplin, Missouri on May 22, and El Reno, Oklahoma on May 24. Tornadoes in this storm were spawned from central Texas to the Upper Midwest. The whole event is estimated to have done $7 billion in damages.

2011 Super Outbreak (April 25-30)
Most of the tornadoes spawned in this storm happened in the Southeast, from Mississippi to Virginia, though a total of 334 tornadoes have been confirmed in 21 states from Texas to New York. April 27th, in particular, was a notably destructive and deadly day, as 188 tornadoes touched down in the Southeast, four of which were rated EF-5. The NCDC estimates that the Super Outbreak resulted in at least $5.5 billion in damages.

Mississippi River Flood 2011 Memphis
Just a portion of the aftermath from the EF-4 tornado that devastated Tuscaloosa, Alabama
on April 27, 2011. Image credit: Wikipedia

Midwest/Southeast Tornado Outbreak (April 14-16)
This storm generated at least 200 tornadoes across 16 states in mid-April, leading to 38 deaths. The system moved quickly from the Plains to the Mid-Atlantic, where the most notable tornado of the outbreak occurred near Raleigh, North Carolina. This tornado was rain-wrapped as it headed in the direction of Raleigh, and was later rated an EF-3. The NCDC estimates that this outbreak resulted in $2 billion in damages.

Southeast/Midwest Severe Storms (April 8-11)
Tornadoes were reported in Virginia and Iowa from April 8-11. A significant day of severe weather occurred on April 9th, as a powerful storm over the Upper Midwest spawned tornadoes in Iowa. The strongest of these tornadoes was the huge, 3/4 mile-wide tornado that plowed through the tiny town of Mapleton, Iowa on Saturday evening, leaving a trail of destruction 3.5 miles long. The tornado, preliminarily rated as an EF-3 with 136 – 165 mph winds, flattened 20% of the town of 1200 residents and damaged half of the buildings. The NCDC estimates that this weekend of severe weather caused $2.2 billion in damages.

Midwest/Southeast Severe Storms (April 4-5)
Damaging straight-line winds and tornadoes were spawned by a storm that pushed through the central U.S. in early April. Power outages were extensive across the southern and eastern U.S., and many people were killed by falling trees and branches. Tornadoes touched down in Arkansas, Kentucky, and Mississippi. 1,318 reports of damaging wind were submitted to local Weather Service offices on April 4th alone. The NCDC estimates that this tornado and wind event caused $2 billion in damages.

Groundhog Day Blizzard of 2011
This storm stretched from northeast Mexico to Canada, but is most memorable for its effect on Chicago, where 1-2 feet of snow fell, combined with winds over 60 mph which led to blizzard conditions. 21.2 inches of snow fell at Chicago O’Hare International Airport, making it the third largest snowfall total in Chicago history. Blizzard conditions were reported in many other large cities during the storm’s lifetime, including Oklahoma City, St. Louis, Detroit, Cleveland, and New York. This storm also brought ice and wintry mix as far south as Albuquerque, Dallas, and Houston. At least 36 deaths were caused by this storm, most of which were vehicle-related. NCDC estimates this storm did at least $3.9 billion in damage.

Chicago Blizzard 2011
The Windy City on February 1, 2011 during the Groundhog Day Blizzard.

NHC Invest 90L, Born Again

Invest 90L spiked in thunderstorm activity and circulation yesterday, leading NHC to re-invest the system. 90L is still south of Cuba moving ever-so-slowly to the west. While low level (850mb) circulation has increased since yesterday morning, the system is tilted southeast with height. This is likely due to the westerly wind shear it’s facing right now. As the system moves into the Gulf, shear will become more favorable (if there’s shear present, easterly is better than westerly). The wave is still moist and moisture is expected to remain high (4 to 5.5 g/kg specific humidity) as it tracks into the Gulf of Mexico.

Again this morning, none of the models are suggesting meaningful development of Invest 90L. However, the GFS (finally) has come around to resolving the circulation at all. Dr. Rob Carver and I spoke this morning, and we came to the conclusion that the lack of observations in this region, combined with the small size of the system, is causing the models to not have the best handle on the situation. The Hurricane Center has a Hurricane Hunter mission scheduled for 18z (2pm EDT) tomorrow, after which we could see the models starting to favor development again. Today the Hurricane Center is forecasting a 20% chance of development over the next 48 hours. I agree with that, but I also think that beyond 48 hours this wave is going to have a better shot at developing a closed circulation at the surface.

http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/article.html?entrynum=1856

Climate Change Update: Jellyfish Cause Nuclear Event in Israel


From: NibiruMagick2012  | Jul 5, 2011

Swarms of jellyfish threaten to shut down the Orot Rabin nuclear power plant in Hadera, Israel. The jellyfish are blocking the plant’s water supply, interrupting the cooling process.
Workers have been removing the jellyfish to prevent the reactors from being shut down.
http://www.rawstory.com/rawreplay/2011/07/jellyfish-could…

Japanese professor: “Soil contamination is spreading in the city” 60 km from Fukushima plant — “Evacuation must be conducted as soon as possible”
http://enenews.com/

http://www.sott.net/signs/list_by_category/4-The-Living-P…
http://theextinctionprotocol.wordpress.com/
http://hisz.rsoe.hu/alertmap/index2.php?lang=

VIDEOS:
(Fort Calhoun) Nebraska Cooper Nuclear Power Plant : Arnie Gundersen 7/5/2011
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJDfUfXlTtQ
“ALERT ON MONTANA ISSUES STATE OF EMERGENCY OVER YELLOWSTONE RIVER OILSPILL
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BF6vKgSo6Lg
Sun-Diving Comet & G1 Geomagnetic Storm July 6th, 2011
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ttKzZ7TqlLY
7/5/2011 — Tornadoes in Nebraska again — NAM — north american monsoon
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UzTMWKyhK_8
Fort Peck Dam, Montana Rain 7/5/2011
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eeUvzooS30o
Massive Dust Storm Slams Phoenix Valley – Inside the storm live footage July 2011
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5XylLSlhupQ

Experts warn epic weather ravaging US could worsen


Mira Oberman
Agence France-Presse
Wed, 29 Jun 2011 20:06 CDT
Print
extreme us weather

© AFP/Getty Images/Kevork Djansezian
Smoke rises around the Lee Valley Recreational area in the Apache National Forest during back burn operations as the Wallow Fire continues to burn in Big Lake, Arizona on June 12. Epic floods, massive wildfires, drought and the deadliest tornado season in 60 years are ravaging the United States, with scientists warning that climate change will bring even more extreme weather.
Epic floods, massive wildfires, drought and the deadliest tornado season in 60 years are ravaging the United States, with scientists warning that climate change will bring even more extreme weather.

The human and economic toll over just the past few months has been staggering: hundreds of people have died, and thousands of homes and millions of acres have been lost at a cost estimated at more than $20 billion.

And the United States has not even entered peak hurricane season.

“This spring was one of the most extreme springs that we’ve seen in the last century since we’ve had good records,” said Deke Arndt, chief of climate monitoring for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

While it’s not possible to tie a specific weather event or pattern to climate change, Arndt said this spring’s extreme weather is in line with what is forecast for the future.

“In general, but not everywhere, it is expected that the wetter places will get wetter and the drier places will tend to see more prolonged dry periods,” he told AFP.

“We are seeing an increase in the amount (of rain and snow) that comes at once, and the ramifications are that it’s a lot more water to deal with at a time, so you see things like flooding.”

More than 6.8 million acres in the central United States have been swamped after record spring rainfall overwhelmed rivers already swollen from the melting of a heavy winter snow pack.

Some levees burst under the pressure as the mighty Mississippi River swelled to more than three miles (nearly five kilometers) in width. Others were intentionally breached in order to ease pressure and protect cities downstream.

The latest flooding along the Missouri River has forced mass evacuations and threatened to inundate two nuclear power plants in Nebraska.

Meanwhile, the southern United States is dealing with one of the most extreme droughts since the dust bowl of the 1930s, and the dry conditions have led to massive and uncontrollable wildfires.

More than 4.7 million acres have been burned in some 32,000 separate fires so far this year, which is more than twice the annual average over the past decade, according to the National Interagency Fire Center.

Texas, Arizona and New Mexico have lost the most land, and one fire even spread to the grounds of the top US nuclear research lab on Monday.

As with the plants in Nebraska, officials said the nuclear material stored inside is safe and that no contaminants have been released.

While most people have been able to escape the slow-moving floodwaters and wildfires unharmed, the spring’s violent storms have unleashed scenes of apocalyptic destruction.

Tornadoes have killed 542 people so far this year, making 2011 the deadliest tornado season since 1936 and the fourth worst on record, according to the National Weather Service.

Two bad days accounted for nearly all the deaths: an outbreak of dozens of tornadoes that killed 314 people in five southern states on April 27, and a nearly mile-wide twister that cut a six-mile (nearly 10 kilometer) swath of destruction through Joplin, Missouri on May 22, killing 146 people.

Climate change could bring less tornadoes, because while a warmer atmosphere will absorb more precipitation, causing more storms, it could also reduce the wind shear that builds storm intensity when cold and warm fronts collide.

However, the intensity of future droughts, heat waves, storms and floods is expected to rise drastically if greenhouse gas emissions don’t stabilize soon, said Michael Mann, a scientist at Penn State University.

“Even a couple degree warming can make a 100-year event a three-year event,” Mann, the head of the university’s earth systems science center, told AFP.

“It has to do with the tail of the bell curve. When you move the bell curve, that area changes dramatically.”

More extreme weather is expected in the coming months, said Jon Gottschalck, head of forecast operations at NOAA’s climate prediction center.

“We’re expecting warmer than normal conditions to continue across much of the south. The drought is probably going to continue in many areas,” he said.

“We also expect wetter than normal conditions to continue for the next season or two in the northern Rockies…and an active hurricane season.”

Scorched Earth Policy


If something were to happen where people needed to grab their bug out bags and go into survival mode, Henning raises some very good points here that are something to take into consideration now. To be honest, if you can get off the mainland and come here to Hawaii you will be much better off in the long run.  Quite a few people are even buying investment property here as a place to fall back on if they need a place to go when SHTF, if you want information about coming here leave a comment below and I’ll do what I can to help.

I left Los Angeles last year in April, it feels so much safer here and I haven’t regretted it for one moment.

Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano eruption burns 75 acres



Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano eruption burns 75 acres

March 15, 2011 – HONOLULU – Authorities say lava from a volcano eruption in Hawaii has sparked a wildfire in Volcanoes National Park. Park firefighters said Monday that the blaze has burned at least 75 acres (30 hectares) since Sunday. They say the lava is from the Kamoamoa eruption. Park ranger Mardie Lane says the fire is creeping through Ohia forest in an area that has been burned at least twice due to lava flows. Kilauea, one of the world’s most active volcanoes, has been in constant eruption since Jan. 3, 1983. Firefighters plan to fly over the area Tuesday to assess the situation. -CTV
http://www.ctv.ca/CTVNews/SciTech/20110315/hawaii-kamoamoa-volcanic-eruption-sparks-wildfire-110315/