European Agency Warns of Risk to Humans in Pesticides Tied to Bee Deaths


December 24th, 2013

New York Times
By Danny Hakim

nrcs_beesLONDON — European food regulators said on Tuesday that a class of pesticides linked to the deaths of large numbers of honey bees might also harm human health, and they recommended that the European Commission further restrict their use.

The commission, which requested the review, has already taken a tougher stance than regulators in other parts of the world against neonicotinoids, a relatively new nicotine-derived class of pesticide. Earlier this year, some were temporarily banned for use on many flowering crops in Europe that attract honey bees, an action that the pesticides’ makers are opposing in court.

Now European Union regulators say the same class of pesticides “may affect the developing human nervous system” of children. They focused on two specific versions of the pesticide, acetamiprid and imidacloprid, saying they were safe to use only in smaller amounts than currently allowed. Imidacloprid was one of the pesticides placed under a two-year ban this year.

The review was prompted by a Japanese study that raised similar concerns last year.

Imidacloprid is one of the most popular insecticides, and is used in agricultural and consumer products. It was developed by Bayer, the German chemicals giant, and is the active ingredient in products like Bayer Advanced Fruit, Citrus & Vegetable Insect Control, which can be purchased at stores internationally, including Home Depot in the United States.

Acetamiprid is sold by Nisso Chemical, a German branch of a Japanese company, though it was developed with Bayer’s help. It is used in consumer products like Ortho Flower, Fruit & Vegetable Insect Killer.

The action by European regulators could affect the entire category of neonicotinoid pesticides, however.

James Ramsay, a spokesman for the European Food Safety Authority, which conducted the review, said the agency was recommending a mandatory submission of studies related to developmental neurotoxicity “as part of the authorization process in the E.U.”

“We’re advising that all neonicotinoid substances be evaluated as part of this testing strategy, providing that they show a similar toxicological profile to the two substances we’ve assessed in this opinion,” he said.

Research by the Environmental Protection Agency in the United States has also raised concerns about the effect of the pesticides on honey bees, but the agency has not yet seen enough evidence to take action. The E.P.A. did not immediately have a response on Tuesday.

Bayer sharply disputed the European assessment on Tuesday.

“Imidacloprid has no developmental neurotoxicity potential in humans,” Richard Breum, a spokesman for Bayer CropScience, said in a statement. He raised questions about the Japanese research, which he said “reports investigations in rat cell cultures, i.e. in an artificial system.”

“Bayer CropScience has also evaluated the publication and can confirm that few conclusions can be drawn from it,” he added.

Bayer’s stock fell slightly in European trading Tuesday. Bayer, along with two competitors, Syngenta and BASF, is already disputing the existing limited ban on neonicotinoids in the European courts.

A spokesman for Nisso Chemical could not be reached Tuesday evening in Europe.

In a statement, the European Food Safety Authority said it “recognizes the available evidence has limitations and recommends further research be carried out to provide more robust data,” but added that “health concerns raised in the review of the existing data are legitimate.”

The matter now goes before the European Commission, the executive arm of the European Union. It will probably take several months before any action is taken, as was the case when the food safety authority recommended action to safeguard bee populations.

Frédéric Vincent, a spokesman for the commission, said the process of reviewing the findings would allow Bayer and Nisso to comment on the recommendation.

Previously, neonicotinoids have been seen by many scientists as a potential culprit in unusually large die-offs of honey bees in North America and Western Europe that were first noticed in 2006. Bayer attributes the deaths to the varroa mite, a parasite that has long been a threat to bees.

But in October, a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal examined how a neonicotinoid made by Bayer “adversely affects the insect immune response and promotes replication of a viral pathogen in honey bees bearing covert infections.”

www.cornucopia.org/2013/12/european-agency-warns-risk-humans-pesticides-tied-bee-deaths/

 

Concerns raised over a number of dead birds in Bahrain


 

Bird lovers in the country are in a shock after hearing reports about increasing number of birds either lying dead or injured on roads, pavements and in parks. They complain that the authorities concerned did not take adequate steps despite seeing a legion of dead birds in many areas including Manama and Adliya. However, the reasons behind mass deaths are unknown.

Speaking to DT News, Bahrain Animal Lovers Society Founder Huda Muhammed urged the residents not to ignore injured birds on roads as timely treatment could save their lives. “I have seen dead birds many times in Adliya near Fuddruckers. The reasons for their death are many. But, mostly it happens out of accidents with birds hitting the windshields of the car,” she pointed out.

“Generally, in Bahrain, people don’t care for injured birds. I think we need to be more compassionate towards this poor living creatures,” she added. Echoing a similar view, Sam Viegas, another bird lover said, “Birds lying dead on roads is a horrific scene to watch. People concerned should investigate the reasons and put an end to this.”

http://www.sott.net/article/270800-Concerns-raised-over-a-number-of-dead-birds-in-Bahrain

 

Oil impact on dolphins


news/2010_jan/bottlenose

December 2013: In Louisiana’s Barataria Bay Bottlenose dolphins are five times more likely to suffer from lung damage and adrenal hormone abnormalities than any other dolphin populations as a result of the Deepwater Horizon spill, scientists have discovered.

 

Twenty-nine of the total 32 dolphins sampled in Barataria Bay received comprehensive physical examinations, including ultrasound examinations to assess lung condition and researchers assigned almost half (48 percent) of the dolphins a guarded or worse prognosis. In fact, they classified 17 percent as being in poor or grave condition, meaning the dolphins were not expected to survive.

 

The researchers also found that 25 percent of the Barataria Bay dolphins were significantly underweight and the population overall had very low levels of adrenal hormones, which are critical for responding to stress.

 

These findings are in contrast to dolphins sampled in Sarasota Bay, Florida, an area not oiled by the Deepwater Horizon spill. For Dr. Lori Schwacke, the study’s lead author and veteran of a number of similar dolphin health studies across the southeast, the findings are troubling: “I’ve never seen such a high prevalence of very sick animals — and with unusual conditions such as the adrenal hormone abnormalities.”

 

The study was conducted in August 2011 as part of the Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) by a team of government, academic and non-governmental researchers and results were published were published December 2013 in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

http://www.wildlifeextra.com/go/news/oil-impact-on-dolphins.html#cr

 

Scientists Report Some Gulf Dolphins Are Gravely Ill


 

View slideshow Following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, numerous dolphins were documented encountering oil, such as those in this photo from July 2010.


Listen to a recording of December 18 media press call

If you missed our live tweeting during December 18 media call, click the image below for a quick recap.

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More Information

Gulf Dolphin Study
NOAA’s Response and Restoration Blog—Gulf Dolphins
Dolphin health assessment in Barataria Bay
Unusual Mortality Event investigation in northern Gulf of Mexico

December 18, 2013 
Bottlenose dolphins in Louisiana’s Barataria Bay have lung damage and adrenal hormone abnormalities not previously seen in other dolphin populations, according to a new peer-reviewed study published Dec. 18, 2013 in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

The Deepwater Horizon spill heavily oiled Barataria Bay. The study was conducted in August 2011 as part of the Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) by a team of government, academic and non-governmental researchers. In the NRDA process, federal and state trustee agencies working cooperatively with BP identify potential injuries to natural resources and lost public uses resulting from the spill, along with restoration projects to ensure that the public is fully compensated for its loss.

The publication details the first evidence that dolphins in heavily oiled areas are exhibiting injuries consistent with toxic effects observed in laboratory studies of mammals exposed to petroleum hydrocarbons. The dolphin health study concludes that the health effects seen in the Barataria Bay dolphins are significant and likely will lead to reduced survival and ability to reproduce.

Twenty-nine of the total 32 dolphins sampled in Barataria Bay received comprehensive physical examinations, including ultrasound examinations to assess lung condition. The researchers assigned almost half (48 percent) of the dolphins a guarded or worse prognosis. In fact, they classified 17 percent as being in  poor or grave condition, meaning the dolphins were not expected to survive.

These findings are in contrast to dolphins sampled in Sarasota Bay, Florida, an area not oiled by the Deepwater Horizon spill. For Dr. Lori Schwacke, the study’s lead author and veteran of a number of similar dolphin health studies across the southeast, the findings are troubling: “I’ve never seen such a high prevalence of very sick animals — and with unusual conditions such as the adrenal hormone abnormalities.”

The NRDA researchers found that moderate to severe lung disease was five times more likely in the Barataria Bay dolphins, with symptoms including lung masses and consolidation. The researchers also found that 25 percent of the Barataria Bay dolphins were significantly underweight and the population overall had very low levels of adrenal hormones, which are critical for responding to stress.

The researchers examined alternative hypotheses for the dolphins’ disease conditions, such as exposure to other man-made chemicals that have previously been measured in high concentrations in marine mammals and also associated with impacts on health.  Blubber samples from the Barataria Bay dolphins, however, showed relatively low concentrations for the broad suite of chemicals measured, including PCBs and commonly detected persistent pesticides, as compared to other coastal dolphin populations.

Based on the findings from the 2011 dolphin health study, researchers performed three additional health assessments in 2013 as part of the Deepwater Horizon NRDA. The studies were repeated in Barataria Bay and Sarasota Bay, and also expanded to Mississippi Sound, including both Mississippi and Alabama waters. Results from these more recent health assessments are still pending.

Researchers conducting the NRDA studies are collaborating closely with the team conducting an Unusual Mortality Event (UME) investigation in the northern Gulf of Mexico under the Marine Mammal Protection Act. Investigations of this type follow stranding events that are unexpected, involve a significant die-off and demand an immediate response.  The observed increase in the number of dolphin strandings now includes more than 1,050 animals that have stranded along the Gulf Coast from the Texas/Louisiana border through Franklin County, Florida. Ninety-four percent of these animals have stranded dead.

The UME investigation, spanning from February 2010 to present, is the longest UME response since 1992, and includes the greatest number of stranded dolphins in an UME in the Gulf of Mexico. Dr. Teresa Rowles, lead for the Marine Mammal Health and Stranding Response Program and a co-author on the dolphin health publication, indicates that “these dolphin health studies will contribute significant information for both the NRDA and the UME investigation as we compare disease findings in the wild, living dolphins to the pathologies and analyses from the dead animals across the northern Gulf.”

http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/stories/2013/12/12_18_13gulf_dolphin_study.html

 

Reports: 98% Of Pacific Seafloor Covered In Dead Sea Creatures 145 Miles Off The Coast Of California…


December 13, 2013
fukushima.jpg

(BIN) – This newly released story from ENENews is mindblowing and shares how quickly since the Fukushima disaster happened that our chain of life in the seas is dying. This information is taken from both National Geographic and the National Academy of Sciences and shares that as of July 1st of 2012, 98% of the studied sea floor 145 miles off the coast of California was covered with dead and decomposing sea creatures. For those who think that 98% is probably a normal study number, only a few months earlier, the same study found less than 1% of the sea floor covered with ‘detritus’.Several up to date video reports below as well including one from kevin blanch who shares that squid are now washing ashore on Santa Cruz beaches as well as well as one from MsMilkytheclown1 who shares more about the deadly quality of the radiation we are now getting from Fukushima..:

National Geographic, Nov. 22, 2013: [...] “In the 24 years of this study, the past 2 years have been the biggest amounts of this detritus by far,”  said study leader Christine Huffard, a marine biologist at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute in California. [...] In March 2012, less than one percent of the seafloor beneath Station M [located 145 miles west of the coast of California between Santa Barbara and Monterey] was covered in dead sea salps. By July 1, more than 98 percent of it was covered in the decomposing organisms, according to the study, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. [...]  Although climate change is a leading contender for explaining the major increases in 2011 and 2012, Huffard says that these spikes could be part of a longer-term trend that scientists haven’t yet observed. She hopes to continue gathering data from Station M to try and figure it out.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Nov. 11, 2013 (emphasis added): [...] Two major peaks in POC [particulate organic carbon] flux occurred over the last 18 mo of the time series [...] The peak POC flux in spring/summer 2011 was the highest recorded over the 24-y time series (Fig. 1D)  [...] The daily presence of detrital aggregates on the sea floor did not exceed 15% coverage over the period from 1990 to 2007. The highest sea-floor coverage by detrital aggregates measured throughout the 24-y time series occurred between March and August 2012, when salp detritus ranged from <1% cover in early March to a high of 98% cover on 1 July (Fig. 1E)

Starfish On The West Coast Are Losing Their Limbs And Turning Into Slime


Source: Wikipedia Commons
This is an article by Reuters I had recently stumbled across. Could the fact that Fukushima is leaking 300 tons of radioactive water in the pacific ocean everyday have anything to do with this?

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – Scientists are struggling to find the trigger for a disease that appears to be ravaging starfish in record numbers along the U.S. West Coast, causing the sea creatures to lose their limbs and turn to slime in a matter of days.

Marine biologists and ecologists will launch an extensive survey this week along the coasts of California, Washington state and Oregon to determine the reach and source of the deadly syndrome, known as “star wasting disease.”
“It’s pretty spooky because we don’t have any obvious culprit for the root cause even though we know it’s likely caused by a pathogen,” said Pete Raimondi, chair of the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of California at Santa Cruz’s Long Marine Lab.
Signs of sea star wasting syndrome typically begin with white lesions on the arms of the starfish that spread inward, causing the entire animal to disintegrate in less than a week, according to a report by the Pacific Rocky Intertidal Monitoring Program at the University of California at Santa Cruz.
Starfish have suffered from the syndrome on and off for decades but have usually been reported in small numbers, isolated to Southern California and linked to a rise in seawater temperatures, which is not the case this time, Raimondi said.
Since June, wasting sea stars have been found in dozens of coastal sites ranging from southeast Alaska to Orange County, California, and the mortality rates have been higher than ever seen before, Raimondi said. In one surveyed tide pool in Santa Cruz during the current outbreak, 90 to 95 percent of hundreds of starfish were killed by the disease.
“Their tissue just melts away,” said Melissa Miner, a biologist and researcher with the Multi-Agency Rocky Intertidal Network, a group of government agencies, universities and nonprofits that monitor tidal wildlife and environment along the West Coast.
Miner, based in Washington state, has studied wasting starfish locally and in Alaska since June, when only a few cases had been reported. “It has ballooned into a much bigger issue since then,” she said.
The syndrome primarily affects the mussel-eating Pisaster ochraceus, a large purple and orange starfish, but Raimondi said that at least 10 species of sea stars have shown signs of the disease since June.
If the numbers of Pisaster ochraceus begin to decrease, mussels could crowd the ocean, disrupting biodiversity, he said. He has studied wasting starfish and will aid in the months-long survey of the animals, along with other state and federal researchers.
In addition to on-site sampling, scientists in the coming months will use an interactive map to spot starfish wasting location patterns and help identify a driver for the disease.
Raimondi said he could not estimate, out of the millions of starfish on the West Coast, how many have been affected or could be in the future.
“We’re way at the onset now, so we just don’t know how bad it’s going to get,” he said.
(Editing by Cynthia Johnston and Lisa Shumaker)
This post originally appeared at Reuters.

Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

- See more at: http://www.themindunleashed.org/2013/11/starfish-on-west-coast-are-losing-their_8.html#sthash.qSvBzTSo.dpuf

 

Ed. note: IMO this is connected to the mass extinction event that began 100yrs ago, long before Fukushima and industrial toxins. The planet is going thru a dimensional shift, as the process unfolds large numbers of species are crossing over to higher dimensions connected to the New Earth. Radiation and other toxins “may” be a trigger for the mass migration, but it is all part of Earth’s Divine Plan unfolding.

Scientists discover another cause of bee deaths, and it’s really bad news


 

 

Jaymi Heimbuch

July 26, 2013

 

 

So what is with all the dying bees? Scientists have been trying to discover this for years. Meanwhile, bees keep dropping like… well, you know.

Is it mites? Pesticides? Cell phone towers? What is really at the root? Turns out the real issue really scary, because it is more complex and pervasive than thought.

Quartz reports:

Scientists had struggled to find the trigger for so-called Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) that has wiped out an estimated 10 million beehives, worth $2 billion, over the past six years. Suspects have included pesticides, disease-bearing parasites and poor nutrition. But in a first-of-its-kind study published today in the journal PLOS ONE, scientists at the University of Maryland and the US Department of Agriculture have identified a witch’s brew of pesticides and fungicides contaminating pollen that bees collect to feed their hives. The findings break new ground on why large numbers of bees are dying though they do not identify the specific cause of CCD, where an entire beehive dies at once.

The researchers behind that study in PLOS ONE — Jeffery S. Pettis, Elinor M. Lichtenberg, Michael Andree, Jennie Stitzinger, Robyn Rose, Dennis vanEngelsdorp — collected pollen from hives on the east coast, including cranberry and watermelon crops, and fed it to healthy bees. Those bees had a serious decline in their ability to resist a parasite that causes Colony Collapse Disorder. The pollen they were fed had an average of nine different pesticides and fungicides, though one sample of pollen contained a deadly brew of 21 different chemicals. Further, the researchers discovered that bees that ate pollen with fungicides were three times more likely to be infected by the parasite.

The discovery means that fungicides, thought harmless to bees, is actually a significant part of Colony Collapse Disorder. And that likely means farmers need a whole new set of regulations about how to use fungicides. While neonicotinoids have been linked to mass bee deaths — the same type of chemical at the heart of the massive bumble bee die off in Oregon — this study opens up an entirely new finding that it is more than one group of pesticides, but a combination of many chemicals, which makes the problem far more complex.

And it is not just the types of chemicals used that need to be considered, but also spraying practices. The bees sampled by the authors foraged not from crops, but almost exclusively from weeds and wildflowers, which means bees are more widely exposed to pesticides than thought.

The authors write, “[M]ore attention must be paid to how honey bees are exposed to pesticides outside of the field in which they are placed. We detected 35 different pesticides in the sampled pollen, and found high fungicide loads. The insecticides esfenvalerate and phosmet were at a concentration higher than their median lethal dose in at least one pollen sample. While fungicides are typically seen as fairly safe for honey bees, we found an increased probability of Nosema infection in bees that consumed pollen with a higher fungicide load. Our results highlight a need for research on sub-lethal effects of fungicides and other chemicals that bees placed in an agricultural setting are exposed to.”

While the overarching issue is simple — chemicals used on crops kill bees — the details of the problem are increasingly more complex, including what can be sprayed, where, how, and when to minimize the negative effects on bees and other pollinators while still assisting in crop production. Right now, scientists are still working on discovering the degree to which bees are affected and by what. It will still likely be a long time before solutions are uncovered and put into place. When economics come into play, an outright halt in spraying anything at all anywhere is simply impossible.

Quartz notes, “Bee populations are so low in the US that it now takes 60% of the country’s surviving colonies just to pollinate one California crop, almonds. And that’s not just a west coast problem—California supplies 80% of the world’s almonds, a market worth $4 billion.”

http://www.treehugger.com/natural-sciences/scientists-discover-another-cause-bee-deaths-and-its-really-bad-news.html

 

Up to 5 million seabirds likely to have died on Australian and New Zealand beaches


 

 

Concerns raised over number of dead birds on Coast beaches

TOO MANY DEAD: A mutton bird washed ashore

Lindsay Dines has been watching dead mutton birds wash in at Teewah for more than a month.

He knows death is part of their migratory fate.

Their long, figure eight of the Pacific that starts in Tasmania, touches the northern hemisphere Aleutian Islands and then California before the long journey home.

But Lindsay fears something more is at play.

The avid fisherman and environmentalist has deep concerns about the numbers dying.

“I’m told that a month ago a count was done by someone – 25,000 between Noosa North Shore and Caloundra,” he said.

“And there are media reports of dead birds extending from Bundaberg to southern coast of Victoria, plus Tasmania and the New Zealand’s west coast – in abnormally large numbers and along all beaches creating great concern in communities all along the coast.

“All birds tested by vets were found to be emaciated and starving.”

Given the range of the death and numbers being reported, Mr Dines fears as many as five million birds may have died.

When conditions are calmer, they seek out baitfish herded to the surface by tuna and other predatory fish.

“Feeding on migration is essential and is totally dependent on there being both predatory fish and baitfish along the migratory path,” Mr Dines said.

“This year has been different to past mass deaths.

“The shearwaters are frantically trying to feed inshore in large numbers before they land on the water in the surf or not far beyond and wash in mostly alive.

“There are insufficient predatory fish present inshore to herd the baitfish for the shearwaters to feed.

“I’ve been watching all seabirds, including shear waters over the last few months constantly searching for food, but they are rarely finding any.”

University of Canberra’s Professor Nick Klomp, now deputy vice-chancellor for education, spent 20 years researching short-tail shearwaters (mutton birds).

He said Mr Dines’ theory might well be true but it needed further research.

Prof Klomp said shearwaters that had successfully completed their annual migration were now laying eggs at their breeding grounds in southern NSW, Victoria and the islands off Tasmania.

He said there was no doubt impact of environmental factors could lead to more deaths than normal.

http://www.sott.net/article/269338-Up-to-5-million-seabirds-likely-to-have-died-on-Australian-and-New-Zealand-beaches

 

 

Scientists looking for answers after hundreds of dead turtles wash ashore


sea turtle

Scientists believe a neurotoxin produced by algae may be behind the deaths of hundreds of sea turtles, which have washed up dead on beaches across Central America. Source: ThinkStock

 

HUNDREDS of sea turtles are washing up dead on the beaches of Central America and scientists don’t know why.

 

One hypothesis is that the killer is a potent neurotoxin that can be produced by algae during red tides, which are large accumulations of algae that turn sea water red or brown.

What puzzles scientists is the fact that red tides have come and gone before without taking such a deadly toll on turtles.

Making things worse, some of the turtles that are dying are endangered species.

In El Salvador, for instance, from late September to the middle of October, 114 sea turtles were discovered dead on Pacific coast beaches, according to the environment ministry.

They were black turtles (Chelonia agassizii), Olive Ridley turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea) and ones that are a cross between the two.

 

Scientists throughout Central America are alarmed, and the only laboratory that specialises in turtles is taking tissue and organ samples in a bid to figure out what is going on.

The death toll elsewhere is high – 115 so far this year in Guatemala, 280 in Costa Rica and an undisclosed number in Nicaragua. Another 200 died in late 2012 in Panama.

And in Nicaragua there is yet another problem: the turtles showed up weeks late, at the end of September, to crawl up onto the beach and lay their eggs.

“Some say it could be due to climate change, sea currents or the techniques used by fishermen,” said biologist Ivan Ramirez of the Foundation for the Sustainable Development of Nicaragua (Fundenic).

The head of wildlife and ecosystems at the Salvadoran environment ministry, Nestor Herrera, said the strongest hypothesis over the death of the turtles is that they were killed by saxitoxin – which affects the nervous system and can be produced by a red tide.

In one area of El Salvador’s coast, dogs that started eating dead turtles stopped breathing and died almost instantly.

In 2006, saxitoxin killed about 500 sea turtles in El Salvador, and four years later, another 100 died of the same cause.

However, there is a red tide almost every year, while such widespread turtle deaths have never happened before, said Angel Ibarra, coordinator of Ecological Unity of El Salvador, who added more study is needed to shed light on the phenomenon.

Others worry that the recent spate of turtle deaths can be traced more directly to human activity.

In Guatemala, the National Council of Protected Areas said some turtles are caught up by industrial-size fishing boats that drag nets along the sea bed and capture everything in their path, a process called trawling.

And drift net fishing, in which very long nets float behind a ship and near the surface of the water, could also be a threat to turtles.

Jose Leonidas Gomez, who works with a sea turtle conservation project in El Salvador, said turtles discovered dead on one beach were found not to have eaten, so it is presumed they got caught in nets.

Biologist Fabio Buitrago of Nicaragua’s Fundenic said turtles are also being killed by fishermen who use explosives, among other techniques. “The fishermen themselves say so,” he said.

Antonio Benavides, a veteran turtle conservationist in El Salvador, said protecting the creatures is all the more difficult because the mortality rate for juveniles is already high.

Only one out of a thousand babies that hatch and make it out into the sea ever returns to the beach as an adult to lay eggs.

Fertility is yet another issue: in September scientists in Honduras said turtles on one beach laid 40 per cent fewer eggs.

 

Fukushima: Life with Horses in Evacuation zone


“Soma Nomaoi(Soma wild horse chase)” that has been designated as a significant intangible folk cultural asset was held on 27 to 29 July in Minami Soma city which is located 40 km away from Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. There is still evacuation zone in a part of this city. More than 400 horses with people costumed samurai paraded streets and did horse racing. It was originally for training samurai, and it has been handed down for over 1000 years. After the nuclear accident, Nomaoi has been reported on medeia as a symbol of recovery from the disaster. This year more than 160,000 people came to this festival to see the cultural event and to support Fukushima. But recovery in Fukushima has lots of contradiction. Nuclear plant is not under the control and people who are living in contaminated area is still trying decontamination. The problem is still there.
The word “Restoration of Fukushima” has overflown in Japan, but problems are not solved and talking about radiation is a kind of taboo.This photo story focuses on a farmer who provides horses to “Soma Nomaoi.” He is living in an evacuation area.
What does “Recovery” mean to people who are living in Fukushima?
Iitate village with its 6,500 residents was a municipality located about 40km away from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant. After the nuclear disester, this village is designated as an evacuation zone, and nobody canʼt get permission to live there due to high contamination.
Hosokawa farm is one of the biggest farms in Iitate village and has been run for more than 100 years. Tokue Hosokawa is the third generation of this farm. He and his daughter Miwa aged 27 train horses to provided them all over Japan for TV commercial, drama, cinema and some festivals which need horses.
A month after the accident, Fukushima prefecture decided to cull domestic animals which were living in the evacuation zone. Animals remained there were not fed. Some became wild and some died of hunger. The reason to cull horses was “hygiene management”.
However, Hosokawa continued to feed his horses going from the place he refuged after the accident. And he fed them so as not to let the prefecture kill his horses. He had about 130 horses in his farm before the accident. And 86 horses evacuated to another place.
About 30 horses have remained in Hosokawa farm because he could’t find a place for them to refuge. He has been continuing to feed them. He and his daughter also helped 752 horses and caws to move from an evacuation zone to a safe place using 2 trucks just after the accident. According to Kyodo news, more than 1300 caws were culled until December 2012.
From the beginning of 2013, 16 horses including foals died in succession for 6 months in Fosokawa Farm. Experts performed an autopsy on a dead body, but they couldn’t find a main cause of their sudden death. Health center of Fukushima took their blood test and inspection, and the result showed that the causes were not infectious desease and parasitic warm. Symptoms were very similar. Once they became unable to walk, they died between several weeks.
This May, he tried to reveal the cause of their sudden death, and he decided to euthanize a horse whose symptom was similar to the other dead horses. And femoral muscle was detected cesium 200 becquerel/ kg by the researcher veterinarian Dr.Hiroyuki Ichikawa. They are studying this data tying to find the effect for their sudden death.
“I could live here thanks to my horses, so I can’t leave here without them. I have lived with horses since I was a child. So horses are my family. I can accept culling, if these horses have infectious desease. But they are fine. This is totally unacceptable. One day, I helped a cow which was pregnant. After evacuating from theMzaoyne2,0a13. calf was born. Unfortunately, his mother died of hunger. But this calf is still alive in another prefecture. I was very happy to help her baby,” he said.
Their most proudly work is to provide horses to intangible cultural asset named “SOMA NOMAOI(Soma wild horse chase)”. He provided about 60 horses to this event before the accident. But this year he provided about 20 horses. He provide horses that is from the other farm. Mainly these horses were trained by Hosokawa once. He couldn’t provide horses from own farm in iitate this year. However some horses that training was not enought were trained in Hosokawa farm.
“There is no future in this village. Only my house that light is going up in the night. Newspaper and mail doesn’t carry to my post. No restaurants and no shops… No people dosen’t come to my house. Only raccoon dog and fox comes to my house. Japan becomes such a pathetic country. After the accidents, my family fell apart. My daughter tried to commit suicide… I am relieved that she survived.
When I saw the foals,I entertained a flicker of hope. but even these foals died… There is no future. Nobody want to live without future. Here is Japan. Do you think it is really okay with this situation in Japan?” He said.
His daughter has a tattoo on her feet to remind herself of her decision to quit her job and go back to her father’s farm. It read “Hosokawa Farm.” “You can know I am Miwa of Hosokawa Farm, wherever I die.” she said.

PHOTO GALLERY

 

Extreme weather events over the last few weeks of October 2013.


1080p Is Available

This series does not mean the world is ending! These are documentaries of series of extreme weather events that are leading to bigger earth changes. If you are following the series, than you are seeing the signs.

*Music Used*
Xtortion Audio – Tournique
Position Music Abandoned freedom

*We are in the time of year when the most remarkable weather events occur. Please check this channel and others for future updates and prepare for the worst.

Also take time out to check out the series 2013Is Strange produced by LAST MESSAGE https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqEP…

*For other events that didn’t make the video this week, and to report events in your area please stop by my Facebook page!
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Hawkke…
Thank you all that are there, without you guys I’m also left in the dark…

Sorry For Any Mistakes

 

Moose die-off is massive, and a mystery to scientists


October 17, 2013 MONTANAAll across the U.S., moose are dying – and scientists yet don’t know how to save them. Moose populations across swaths of the U.S. – from the West Coast to the East Coast, from the Rocky Mountains to the Mississippi River – are declining at an unprecedented rate, imperiling fragile ecosystems and putting the moose tourism industry on edge, the New York Times reported. But though scientists have a long list of culprits – disease; climate change; over-hunting – it’s not clear just what is causing moose to die in droves. And that means that scientists are at the moment unsure how to save America’s moose. Once, moose made headlines for doing a bit too well in the U.S. As the largest members of the deer family, Cervidae, blooming moose populations meant more accidents on rural, mountain roads, and more reports of moose attacks against humans. But the news has changed. In New Hampshire, the moose population has dropped from some 7,000 moose to around just 4,600 animals.
In Montana, numbers have fallen about 40 percent since 1995, and in Wyoming there are just 919 animals left – a quarter of the state’s target moose population. In Minnesota, the population in its northeast has been halved since about 2010, and moose have disappeared almost entirely from its northwest. Only Maine has seen an increase in its moose population, with some 75,000 animals living within its borders. Scientists suggest that climate change is a probable factor, but pinpointing just how climate change affects the moose has been difficult. In New Hampshire, scientists have proposed that longer falls and shorter winters has allowed the winter tick population to bloom, the Washington Post reported. Up to 150,000 ticks can beset a moose at one time, bleeding it out until the moose is little more than ribs, antlers, and some loose skin. In Minnesota, where the average midwinter temperature has risen some 11 degrees over the last 40 years, climate change is also a fingered culprit, the Minnesota Public Radio reported in 2008.

-CSM

 

25 more dead dolphins washed up over the weekend; Total now 164


Posted on: 6:15 pm, August 19, 2013, by , updated on: 09:06am, August 20, 2013

//

News story: VIDEO LINK
For weeks, Susan Barco and her team at the Virginia Aquarium have been trying to stay on top of the 6-7 dead dolphins washing up every day. Still, even they have a breaking point–and it came this weekend.

“It went crazy, we had 11 calls on Saturday, 14 on Sunday, and two of them were live animals,” said Barco. “We are having to put animals in freezers, and we are already having people come from outside to help with necropsies, because just picking up the animals is challenging us right now.”

25 were reported this weekend and three more on Monday which brings the total number of dead dolphins in Virginia to 164 for the year.

That’s 100 more than researchers see in a normal year.

“25 dolphins in one weekend is something we cannot handle, and if it continues at this rate, we are going to have to ask for more outside help,” said Barco.

The affected dolphins are no longer just males and calves, females are also starting to die from the mystery illness.

The freezers at the stranding center are now full with dead dolphins being stacked out in the open waiting for their necropsies.

Experts from the Smithsonian and NOAA are traveling to Virginia Beach to help, but it’s still not enough.

“That’s just for necropsies, that’s not getting animals off the beach, so we need more people to do that,” said Barco.

But it’s hard to bring in more trained people without money.

The aquarium’s stranding team funding has been drained after responding to so many deaths.

“We are applying for an emergency grant, but there is not a lot of extra money, and in fact this grant that supports the stranding network is scheduled to be cut because of sequestration, so we are really worried about the future, and worried about the rest of this year,” said Barco.

Twelve fresh animals have come into the lab so far, one this weekend that was still alive, and had to be euthanized.

Crews worked on it for almost 8 hours Monday, trying to get as many samples as possible, so they can finally figure out what is killing all these dolphins.

“A live animal right now is probably going to be the one that helps us solve this problem,” said Barco.

http://wtkr.com/2013/08/19/25-dead-dolphins-wash-up-over-weekend-makes-164-deaths-this-year-in-va/

 

Signs Of Change For July 2013


With the month of July ending I decided to upload this video in dramatic fashion for the last one of this eventful month. Please feel free to download and share this series if you like them, just remember to leave credit. Also check out the new channel by 2011message called 2013message to continue following his series 2013 Is Strange, find it here http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCnf7M…

Thanks for watching here and stay safe!

Week 4

Week 3

Week 2 (re-run :)

Week 1

Again and again: 37 million bees found dead


 

 

© Unknown

Shortly after 50,000 bees were found dead in an Oregon parking lot (read more here), a staggering 37 million bees have been found dead in Elmwood, Ontario, Canada. Dave Schuit, who runs a honey operation in Elmwood has lost 600 hives. He is pointing the finger at the insecticides known as neonicotinoids, which are manufactured by Bayer CropScience Inc. This also comes after a recent report released by the British Beekeepers Association (BBKA) that recorded its largest loss of honeybees ever. You can read more about that here. The European Union has stepped forward, having banned multiple pesticides that have been linked to killing millions of bees. You can view the studies and read more about that here.

The loss comes after the planting of corn. Neonicotinoid pesticides are used to coat corn seed with air seeders. This results in having the pesticide dust blown into the air when planted. The death of millions of pollinators was studied by Purdue University. They discovered that Bees exhibited neurotoxic symptoms. They analyzed dead bees and found that traces of thiamethoxam/clothiandin were present in each case. The only major source of these compounds are seed treatments of field crops. You can view that study here (1).

Bee deaths are increasing exponentially. An international team of scientists led by Holland’s Utrecht University has concluded that, “large scale prophylaxic use in agriculture, their high persistence in soil and water, and their uptake by plants and translocation to flowers, neonicotinoids put pollinators at risk. This is some of the research that led to the European Unions ban of the pesticides, as mentioned and referenced earlier.

Can we really debate this much longer? The evidence linking pesticides to bee deaths is overwhelming. It’s not only bees, but an array of other insects as well. The last thing we need is for Monsanto and other corps to use another reason to manufacture and develop fake food! One reason that has been used for justification of GMO’s is a food shortage, and we all know how critical bees are to our food supply. There is a huge conflict of interest here, the pesticides used to spray the crops that are killing the bees are developed by biotech corporations like Monsanto.

Time to make the connections, time to speak up!

Sources located here, here, here and here

Climate Change Could Endanger More Animals Than We Thought


 

Climate Change Could Endanger More Animals Than We Thought

A new study presents startling findings that rapid climate change may threaten many more species of plants and animals than previous measures have led us to believe.

The study, one of the biggest of its kind, found that only 6–9% of birds, 11–15% of amphibians, and 6–9% corals are currently listed as threatened with extinction, yet overall up to 41% of the world’s bird species, 29% of amphibians and 22% of corals are “highly climate change vulnerable.”

That’s a large and worrying disparity that, researchers say, may mean conservation efforts are out of step with actual extinction threats.

The ambitious study, published in the journal Plos One, was carried out by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) and uses a new method to assess climate change risk factors for animal and plant species.

Previously, conservation risk assessment has focused only on measuring the amount of change their overall habitat species are likely to experience. The IUCN study, drawing on the work of more than 100 scientists, instead looks at each species’ unique biological and ecological characteristics, and measures exposure risk against sensitivity to climate change and species adaptability.

For instance, the Amazonian Royal Flycatcher, a species of bird already facing the perils of habitat-loss due to deforestation, is under this new measure highly vulnerable to climate change.

Its habitat is predicted to undergo a high level of temperature change. The bird has specific habitat and temperature requirements and therefore will be very sensitive to this change. Due to the fact that the species is localized and does not move from area to area means it is unlikely to adapt well to these changes. This adds up to a less than rosy future for the bird that might have otherwise been missed under the previous assessment criteria.

As you can see, by assessing species in this manner, many more animals and plants could be seen as at risk even though they are not currently treated as threatened. The Amazon rainforest is among the regions the study found to be particularly high in climate change at-risk species, but it isn’t the only region.

Focusing solely on birds, large numbers of highly climate change vulnerable species were also predicted in Mesoamerica, Malaysia, Indonesia and southern Thailand, among other regions. Similarly, should temperatures rise, many more common corals off Indonesia would be highly vulnerable.

Among particular species, Emperor Penguins, the Little Owl and the Imitator Salamander could be classed as markedly climate change vulnerable, none of which have in the past been classed as in direct danger from climate change.

“The findings revealed some alarming surprises,” Wendy Foden, of the IUCN Global Species Program and leader of the study, told Wildlife Extra. “We hadn’t expected that so many species and areas that were not previously considered to be of concern would emerge as highly vulnerable to climate change.”

There are some important caveats to the research, chief among them that the data assessed suffered a number of limitations, but the overall thrust of the argument, that we may need to reconsider climate change threat if we are to ensure preservation of as many species as possible, is largely agreed upon.

Human encroachment, loss of habitat and invasive species all currently rank as more pressing causes of extinction than climate change, the researchers wrote in the study, but conservation priorities should be revised to account for emerging climate risks.

In turn, this data could be used to see where more designated protected wildlife areas might be needed so as to facilitate population management in the face of a rapidly altering climate.

The IUCN will now use these results to update its IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, which is held as a key measure of extinction risk, and this will be used to direct and properly deploy conservation plans in the future.

http://www.care2.com/causes/climate-change-could-endanger-more-animals-than-we-thought.html#ixzz2Wc6VZ4Zr

 

30% Of What You Eat Is Thanks To This Tiny Insect!


 

By Todd Woody, Huffington Post

“If the bee disappeared off the face of the earth, man would only have four years left to live.” – Albert Einstein

Our honey bees are dying. And collapse of the $30 billion honey bee economy in the US is looming. U.S. bee keepers lost a shocking 31% of their hives this winter, as they have for the past seven years in a row. Although the exact causes of Colony Collapse Disorder are not 100% certain, what is crystal clear is that we’re speeding towards the disastrous point at which we will not have enough bees to pollinate our crops.

As a new report from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) details, scientists are still struggling to pinpoint the cause of so-called Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) and time is running out.

“Currently, the survivorship of honey bee colonies is too low for us to be confident in our ability to meet the pollination demands of U.S. agricultural crops,” the report states.

CCD (being dubbed beemageddon) has wiped out some 10 million bee hives worth $2 billion over the past six years. The death rate for colonies has hit 30% annually in recent years and there are now about 2.5 million honey bee colonies in the US, down from 6 million in 1947 and 3 million in 1990. That downward spiral leaves “virtually no cushion of bees for pollination,” the report’s authors write.

If that sounds scary, it is. Take almonds. California harvests more than 80% of the world’s almonds. But you can’t grow the nut without honey bees and it takes 60% of the US’s remaining colonies just to pollinate that one $4 billion cash crop.

If the death toll continues at the present rate, that means there will soon be barely enough bees to pollinate almonds, let alone avocadoes, blueberries, pears or plums. “We are one poor weather event or high winter bee loss away from a pollination disaster,” USDA scientist Jeff Pettis said in the report.

In recent years, agricultural pesticides have become a leading suspect in bee deaths. Attention has focused on a class of chemicals called neonicotinoids. Last month the European Commission imposed a two-year ban on neonicotinoids as global concern grows over the bee population crash, which has affected several European countries too.

But scientists increasingly believe several interacting factor – from disease-carrying parasites to poor nutrition to pesticides—are responsible for the mass die-off. For instance, the report says, studies have shown that exposure to even non-fatal levels of neonicotinoids may make bees more susceptible to disease.

And as agriculture becomes ever more industrial and natural habitats that formerly bordered farmland are destroyed, bees are being starved of the food they need to help produce food for humans. “Undernourished or malnourished bees appear to be more susceptible to pathogens, parasites, and other stressors, including toxins,” said the report.

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/…

Learn More About The Value Of Honeybees To Our Everyday Lives and Discover What You Can Do To Help Avert A Potential Disaster

 

 

Source: http://rodaleinstitute.org/learn/webinars/share-the-buzz/

 

Here are seven simple ways that you can help out our favorite pollinators.

 

1. Speak up!

Add your name to the petition urging the EPA and USDA to ban neonicotinoids, a widely used class of agricultural pesticides that is highly toxic to bees and believed to play a crucial role in colony collapse disorder. The EU has just enacted a ban on neonicotinoids and we must follow Europe’s lead as there is literally no time to waste.
Sign the petition here.

2. Let dandelions and clover grow in your yard.
Dandelions and clover are two of the bees’ favorite foods – they provide tons of nourishment and pollen for our pollinators to make honey and to feed their young. And these flowers could not be any easier to grow – all you have to do is not do anything.

 

3. Stop using commercial pesticides, herbicides and fertilizers.

These chemicals are harmful to bees. And they’re also harmful to you, your family, and our soil and water supply, too. Definitely not worth it

4. Eat honey from a local bee keeper.

This is a pretty sweet way to help the bees. Unlike big honey companies, local bee keepers tend to be much more concerned about the health of their bees than they are about their profits. And their products do not have to travel far to reach your kitchen, either. You can almost always find local honey at your farmers’ market and it may also be available at your local health food or grocery store. It may cost a little more than the commercial options, but it’s well worth it.

5. Plant bee-friendly flowers.

This not only helps the honey bees, it will also make your yard more beautiful and can also provide you with a bunch of great culinary herbs. In addition to the dandelions and clover I mentioned above, bees love many other flowers, including: bee balm, borage, asters, lavender, thyme, mint, rosemary, honey suckle, poppies, sunflowers, marigolds, salvia, butterfly bush, clematis, echinacea (see the bee partaking of some coneflower goodness below) blackberries, raspberries, strawberries, fennel, yellow hyssop, milkweed, goldenrod, and many more.

You can also just buy one of those pre-mixed packets of wildflowers with good results. And, if you’re ever in doubt, choose native plants as they will be best suited to the climate you live in and can help support the bees throughout the season.

6. Buy organic.

Organic food and fibers like cotton and hemp are produced without the use of commercial pesticides, fertilizers and herbicides, making them inherently more bee-friendly than conventionally grown products.

7. Share this post.

Tell your friends, family, neighbors and co-workers and help to create greater awareness for our precious honey bees.

Source: http://www.care2.com/…

 

Bee Alert! A Cause to Celebrate and Capitalize


honey_bee

19th May 2013

By Jack Adam Weber

Contributing Writer for Wake Up World

We have cause to celebrate! Brighter days for honeybees are around the corner. The EU (European Union) is set to enact the first continent-wide ban on a dangerous class of pesticides known as neocitninoids, or “neonics,” that have been unequivocally linked to declining bee populations.

It is also important that we capitalize on this milestone victory. Please urge the EPA to ban neonicotinoid pesticides by taking a moment to sign the petition here.

Bees have been dying off in droves in the U.S. since 2006. A growing body of scientific evidence points to neonicotinoid pesticides as a key contributing factor, along with pathogens and habitat loss. Neonicotinoids continue to be used in the US, despite the widespread evidence that they are killing off bee populations. With beekeepers in this country reporting record-breaking bee losses this year—up to 40% or more—action to protect honeybees is more urgent than ever.

Three neonic pesticides—including thiamethoxam, clothianidin and imidacloprid—create an unacceptable risk to bees. All three will be banned from use in the EU for two years on flowering crops such as corn, oilseed rape (aka, Canola), and sunflowers, which bees pollinate. Note that the first of these two crops, corn and Canola, are GMO crops. Nenonics are heavily employed by the biotech industry.

Bees and other insects are crucial food production. They pollinate three-quarters of all crops worldwide. A series of high-profile scientific studies has linked neonicotinoids to huge losses in the number of queen bees produced and big rises in the numbers of “disappeared” bees, those that fail to return from foraging trips.

The chemical industry has voiced concern that a ban on neonicotinoids would lead to the return of older, more harmful pesticides and crop losses. But activists and supporters of the ban point out this has not occurred during temporary bans in France, Italy and Germany. Further, it has been argued that the use of natural pest predators and regular crop rotation can make up for the difference.

Bayer and Syngenta, two companies that produce and promote the neonicotinoids, as well as GMO crops, unsurprisingly argue that the pesticides are safe for bees. However, this is not the consensus of the scientific community. It was also recently revealed that the minister of agriculture for the UK was involved in intense secret lobbying with Syngenta.

Prof Simon Potts, a bee expert at the University of Reading, said: “The ban is excellent news for pollinators. The weight of evidence from researchers clearly points to the need to have a phased ban of neonicotinoids. There are several alternatives to using neonicotinoids and farmers will benefit from healthy pollinator populations as they provide substantial economic benefits to crop pollination.”

It’s a good day for bees! Please celebrate and capitalize by signing the petition here to ban neonics in the USA.

Notes

The countries that voted against the ban were: the UK, Czech Republic, Italy, Hungary, Romania, Slovakia, Austria and Portugal.

Ireland, Lithuania, Finland and Greece abstained.

Belgium, Bulgaria, Denmark, Estonia, Spain, France, Cyprus, Germany, Latvia, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Poland, Slovenia and Sweden voted for the ban.

Article Sources:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2013/apr/29/bee-harming-pesticides-banned-europe

http://action.panna.org/p/dia/action/public

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2013/apr/28/europe-insecticides-ban-save-bees

About the Author

Jack Adam Weber is a licensed acupuncturist, master herbalist, author, organic farmer, celebrated poet, and activist for Earth-centered spirituality. He integrates poetry, ancient wisdom, holistic medicine, and depth psychology into passionate presentations for personal fulfillment as a path to planetary transformation. His books, artwork, and provocative poems can be found at his website PoeticHealing.com. Jack can be reached at Jack@PoeticHealing.com or on Facebook.

Source

 

The Convenience of Plastic Is Killing Our Oceans


April 8, 2013 | By

Flickr - deadfish - Beel at lAlex Pietrowski, Staff Writer
Waking Times

About 300 million tons of plastic are produced each year. In the US alone, about 30+ million tons of plastic waste is dumped into the solid waste system, including various plastic containers, bags and other types of packaging, with only about 10% being recycled.

Plastic, which was once regarded as convenient and versatile, has actually become one of the biggest environmental problems of our time. Over the last 50 years, we’ve increased the amount of plastic waste 12 fold. Typically plastics are made by using non-renewable resources, and most plastics are non-biodegadable, which means they will be around for centuries. The ingredients used to make plastics, such as petrochemical bisphenol A (BPA) and bisphenol S (BPS), have been linked to a wide range of serious adverse health effects.

“Plastic pollution is a major global phenomenon that has crept up on us over the decades, and it really requires a global and comprehensive solution that includes systemic rethinks about usage and production.” – Doug Woodring, Plastic Disclosure Project (Source: New York Times)

Plastic bags are another concerning issue. Over 1 trillion plastic bags are produced in the world each year. We use them for everything – from carrying groceries, to packing beauty products in our luggage, to storing foods in our refrigerator, and they have made our life much more convenient. Yet, the price for this convenience is astounding. The infographic below, produced by Arte IDEAS, will give you an idea of the impact plastic bags have on the environment:

The impact of plastic has been most detrimental to the world’s waterways. Environmental organizations estimate that about 7 million tons of plastic end up in the seas and oceans each year, polluting beaches even on islands, killing off precious and rare native species.

…the E.U. commissioner for maritime affairs and fisheries, Maria Damanaki, has said that pollution in the Mediterranean Sea has reached “alarming proportions.” (Source: New York Times)

One of the most harrowing examples the devastation already to the Midway Islands, home of the majestic albatross and one of the most remotest places on earth. 2000 miles from another continent, this little oasis is ground zero for the plastic apocalypse and this once pristine group of islands is now a frightening and gruesomely real sign of how plastics choke the life out of an eco-system.

Once in our seas and oceans, plastics break down info smaller fragments, and as the fragments get smaller, more marine life is able to ingest them and suffer consequences such as illness or death. We also suffer considering that we are contaminating a major food source. “One study found that fish in the North Pacific ingest as much as 24,000 tons of plastic debris a year.” (Source: New York Times)

The situation is of dire need of our attention, which makes young inventor, Boyan Slat’s, recent invention so inspiring. Boylan has designed an Ocean Cleanup Array, which he claims could remove up to 7+million tons of plastic waste from our oceans.

The device consists of an anchored network of floating booms and processing platforms that could be dispatched to garbage patches around the world. Instead of moving through the ocean, the array would span the radius of a garbage patch, acting as a giant funnel.

Slat went on to found The Ocean Cleanup Foundation, a non-profit organization which is responsible for the development of his proposed technologies. His ingenious solution could potentially save hundreds of thousands of aquatic animals annually, and reduce pollutants (including PCB and DDT) from building up in the food chain. It could also save millions per year, both in clean-up costs, lost tourism and damage to marine vessels.

(Source: http://www.whydontyoutrythis.com/2013/03/19-year-old-student-develops-ocean-cleanup-array-that-could-remove-7250000-tons-of-plastic-from-the-worlds-oceans.html)

Here is Boylan at TEDxDelft, in an effort to grow funding for his project:

Even though Boylan’s invention is a long way from development and barely scratches the surface of the necessary clean-up efforts, it does offer us a potential tool for helping to clean up this catastrophe. It also shows us how heavily invested the youth of today are in the future.

The problem with plastic will not go away without raising the awareness of all people. Inventive minds such as Boylan Slat are a ray of hope for a solution, but without a great change in people’s everyday awareness and attitudes, not much can be done to stop this.

Cutting out plastic completely is probably impossible in this day and age, but perhaps we can all make an effort to use a bit less. In many countries, health food stores allow you to bring your own packaging to purchase items from food bins, versus buying everything prepackaged in plastic bags and containers. Even certain cities, such as Austin, Texas USA, are starting to ban use of grocery plastic bags in supermarkets.

As an “aware” citizen, I thought to myself, “How could I really have such a significant impact…? I don’t even use all that many plastic bags anyway.” And then I started to pay attention.

Try it for a month. Pay close attention to just how many plastic items you buy, discard, recycle, and reuse. As you do this, you’ll want to reuse and recycle, because you will quickly notice that each and every one of us buys and discards an exorbitant amount of plastic.

Support companies and stores that are more environmentally conscious in regard to packaging and distributing foods and products. Buy plastics made out of organic polymers, making them biodigredable, considering prices of these plastics are become more competitive. Be an aware shopper – our oceans, the living beings inside them, the planet – all need more kindness and awareness from us if they are to survive.

About the Author

Alex Pietrowski is an artist and writer concerned with preserving good health and the basic freedom to enjoy a healthy lifestyle. He is a staff writer for WakingTimes.com and an avid student of Yoga and life.

Sources:

http://curiosity.discovery.com/question/plastic-thrown-away-year-us

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/08/15/business/energy-environment/raising-awareness-of-plastic-waste.html

http://www.whydontyoutrythis.com/2013/03/19-year-old-student-develops-ocean-cleanup-array-that-could-remove-7250000-tons-of-plastic-from-the-worlds-oceans.html

http://www.arteideas.co.uk/blog/how-convenience-is-killing-our-planet/

http://www.tedxdelft.nl/

This article is offered under Creative Commons license. It’s okay to republish it anywhere as long as attribution bio is included and all links remain intact.

http://www.wakingtimes.com/2013/04/08/the-convenience-of-plastic-is-killing-our-oceans/

 

Trapping of millions of birds in Egypt threatens European bird populations ~ Migratory murder on Egypt’s coast!


Note: The only way to stop this insanely inhumane practice is with enough people voicing their outrage and boycotting restaurants that offer migratory birds on the menu. Help spread the word, PLEASE SHARE FREELY…mahalo!

© NABU
The nets stretch approximately 700 kilometres from the Libyan border almost to Gaza

May 2013. Disturbing evidence has emerged from the Mediterranean coast of Egypt: Bavarian Broadcasting have documented a total of 700 kilometres of nets set to catch birds. The birds are then offered as a delicacy in markets and restaurants across Egypt.

The nets are very difficult to avoid for many migratory birds as they form a barrier across their flight path either across the Mediterranean or the Sahara when they are looking for a place to rest. The exact number of birds caught in this way can only be estimated, but experts believe that tens of millions are killed each year.

That songbirds are on the menu (and targeted by many hunters) in many countries of southern Europe and North Africa is nothing new. The existence of fishing nets on the coast of Egypt has long been known, but what is new is the scale of netting, which now extends from Libya across almost the entire coastline of the Egypt to the Sinai – interrupted only in a few places by military installations or major cities.

© NABU
The few birds that escape the nets are often caught by the gun.

Catching birds in Egypt threatens European populations

This form of bird trapping is mostly illegal in Egypt; there are statutory requirements for minimum distances between the nets and maximum stipulated heights but these are largely ignored. Egypt has also signed international agreements on the protection of birds, but the resulting rules are not enforced at all.

Lars Lachmann, bird expert of NABU (Nature and Biodiversity Conservation Union, one of the oldest and largest environment associations in Germany.) states that the implications of bird trapping in Egypt to the European breeding population are not good: “The majority of our species are suffering from habitat loss and climate change; species such as willow warbler, nightingale, wheatear and nightjar will be adversely affected by the massive catch in Egypt.”

Help the fight against this trapping

Any donations will go to NABU’s partner organization “Nature Conservation Egypt” to enable it to campaign locally, through regular monitoring of the extent of bird trapping and also to develop specific projects to prevent bird trapping.

http://www.sott.net/article/261951-Trapping-of-millions-of-birds-in-Egypt-threatens-European-bird-populations

 

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