More weirdness – Thousands of dead prawns and crabs wash up on beach in Chile


BBC News
Wed, 20 Mar 2013
Thousands of dead prawns have washed up on a beach in Chile, sparking an investigation. Hundreds of dead crabs were also washed ashore in Coronel city, about 530km (330 miles) from the capital, Santiago.

© Reuters
Authorities are still collecting evidence to find an explanation for the red tide

Fishermen suggested the deaths may have been caused by local power stations that use seawater as a cooling agent. The power firms have not commented. Experts are looking into water temperature and oxygen levels and other details to explain the deaths.

“We’re investigating the Coronel Bay to establish the physical parameters of temperature, electric conductivity and, above all, the oxygen,” said local environment official Victor Casanova.

© Reuters
Hundreds of dead crabs were washed ashore on the weekend

Local fishermen blamed nearby power generation plants Bocamina 1 and 2 and Colbun.

“I’m 69 years old and started fishing when I was nine, but as a fisherman, I never saw a disaster of this magnitude,” Gregorio Ortega told local Radio Bio Bio.

While some blame pollution, others say the death of the crustaceans could be a consequence of the El Nino phenomenon, which warms the waters of the Pacific.

Marisol Ortega, a spokeswoman for the fishermen, said she feared the deaths would affect the livelihood of their community.

“The way everything is being destroyed here, come the high season in November, we’re already thinking we won’t have anything to take from the sea,” she said.

Note: It appears that the deaths are limited to bottom dwellers in a seismically active region, could the culprit possibly be hydrogen sulfide or heat from volcanic eruptions on the ocean floor?

Lagoon In Rio De Janeiro Is So Polluted That Thousands Of Fish Just Floated Up Dead


Here’s the scene in Rio de Janeiro…

 

This lagoon, called Rodrigo de Freitas, is where the Olympic rowing competitions will be held in 2016.  The fish died after oxygen levels in the water dropped because of pollution, local media said.

Note: Lack of oxygen mostly likely is a result of methane hydrate or hydrogen sulfide release.

 

 

Could Alaska’s mystery seal illness be Arctic sunburn?


Jill Burke

March 13, 2013
Skin lesions on a ringed seal flipper.
Photo courtesy North Slope Borough Department of Wildlife Management

It began in July 2011. Indigenous hunters in Alaska’s Arctic noticed ice seals they rely on for food and other uses covered in oozing sores and losing hair. They were sick and some were dying. Ultimately, more than 200 ice seals turned up with similar symptoms, prompting the federal government to declare the phenomena an “unexplained mortality event,” thus opening up research funding and attracting science minds to try to solve the mystery.

As of this month, despite the international group of scientists and researchers the declaration pulled together, no cause has been officially identified for the illness plaguing the ice seals.

In the time since the first sick seal was discovered, walruses and polar bears have turned up with similar ailments. The smallest of the species — seals — has fared the worst. Polar bears seemed to weather their sickness the best, with no fatalities connected to the illness and no clear clues about whether walruses and polar bears were afflicted with the same disease that had struck the seals.

Curiously, the symptoms seem to have diminished since the first sightings of sick seals and other animals began in mid-2011. And Bruce Wright, a scientist with the Aleutian Pribilof Islands Association, thinks he knows why.

Sunburn.

“I suspected right from the beginning it was UV radiation,” Wright said in an interview from his Anchorage-based office this week. “I was expecting there would be consequences for an ozone hole that had formed over the Arctic.”

Between March and April 2011, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) documented “unprecedented chemical ozone losses” in the Arctic. Less ozone means more of the sun’s harmful ultraviolet rays reach Earth. Perhaps counter intuitively amid an era of climate change, it was cold temperatures in 2011 that lead to the UV increase. As NOAA explains, cold temperatures in the stratosphere allow polar stratospheric clouds to form, which create a good surface for chemical reactions to occur, namely the creation of chlorine, a gaseous agent capable of rapid ozone depletion.

Wright isn’t suggesting all symptoms uncovered during necropsies of the affected seals are sun-burned related. Some of the animals were found to also have bleeding and swelling in their lungs, livers, lymph nodes and other internal organs. Scientists contemplated whether this was the result of secondary bacterial or fungal infections or depleted immune systems. Still, Wright questions the inter-relatedness of multiple stressors, including sun and UV radiation exposure, and other illness or nutritional deficiencies on the overall health of the animals.

He plans to present his theory in May at a science conference in Russia. “It all just made sense to me. I have just been baffled that nobody else has proposed this (sunburn) hypothesis,” he said.

When told about Wright’s theory, Kathy Burek-Huntington, an Eagle River veterinarian who’s assisting with the federal study of sick seals, said, “I think that that’s pretty unlikely.”

If sunburn were the culprit, she’d expect a more straight-forward pattern to the injuries, such as burns or lesions on the top of the head or the back — areas where seals would be most likely to get sun exposure.

Still, the team of scientists Burek-Huntington is assisting has been looking into whether something called photo-sensitization is an aspect of the mystery illness. They wonder whether some other illness in the body is producing light-sensitive blood chemicals, similar to what can happen with hepatitis.

Some skin injury patterns detected on seals support this theory, with lesions consistently found on the eyes, mouth and flippers. Yet, severe hepatitis hasn’t been found in the sick seals. And so the mystery deepens.

One theory? A large algal bloom started in 2009 and which has continued every summer since in the Kotzebue Sound / Chukchi Sea is also being investigated as a factor. Could the bloom cause some chemical reaction in the Arctic animals that in turn has creates photo-sensitivity? Possibly.

“We don’t have a complete answer yet,” said Burek-Huntington, conceding that while many causal agents have been ruled out, there’s much work yet to be done.

Preliminary tests to determine whether exposure from the 2011 Fukushima nuclear plant accident in Japan have also not revealed any answers. More tests on tissue samples for radionuclides associated with the event are being conducted, but those done so far have not yielded any direct connection.

Metabolic and nutritional testing is also being conducted.

Adding to the puzzle is the fact that the cases have tapered off, suggesting either a viral infection or some unique convergence of multiple factors that hasn’t repeated itself. Researchers are also checking if the illness might be just a common ailment in the general population of the animals, like colds are among humans, or if it’s a more limited agent that results in some immunity after first exposure.

Burek-Huntington is suspicious that while there is no proven illness link between the sick seals, walruses and polar bears, there is reason to look for connections. Both seals and walruses showed up with observable illness in 2011, and in both species, some died. Polar bear symptoms were discovered the following spring, in 2012, but none died and none were as ill. The timing makes the veterinarian suspect they are all somehow related. But if they are, connecting the dots will likely be difficult.

Only seals and walrus are included in the current federal study because polar bear symptoms — hair loss, irritated skin, mouth sores — were different and less severe, and there have been previous periods of documented hair loss in the polar bear population. But ringed seals, the ice seal species thought to be most affected by the disease, are a primary food source for polar bears. It stands to reason bears may have become ill after feeding on sick seals in the months leading up to spring 2012.

Unfortunately, when the illness may be linked to multiple factors, it’s harder for scientists to pinpoint the cause.

“The one thing I’ve learned about studying the environment is that it is always more complex than you think,” said Wright, acknowledging there are complexities even to his simple sunburn theory.

And the truth is, many times with investigations of “unexplained mortality events,” the outcome is a frustrating “we don’t know.”

Burek-Huntington remains hopeful this investigation will turn out differently.

“There’s still a lot of possibilities that we are investigating (but) no definitive answers at this point,” she said. “We haven’t given up.”

Contact Jill Burke at jill(at)alaskadispatch.com

http://www.alaskadispatch.com/article/20130313/could-alaskas-mystery-seal-illness-be-arctic-sunburn

Signs Of Change The Past Week Or So March 2013 Part 2


Published on Mar 12, 2013

HawkkeyDavisChannelHawkkeyDavisChannel

There has been some strange and extreme weather going on this year. Earthquakes, massive snowstorms, loud booms, locust invasions and more has taking place the past week or so. This series does not mean the world will end, they show our climate and earth changes in a 7 to 10 time frame. Please respect other peoples comments and beliefs when leaving a comment. Thanks for watching here and be safe all!

Music Used
Future World Music – Spritual Awakening

Strange Booms
MisterMachine1977
http://youtu.be/J54BDU2cLss

My channel on FB
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Hawkkey…

Thank you Julie and others at Weird Weather Group on FB for keeping up on extreme weather events.
https://www.facebook.com/groups/Weird…

Watch More Of This Series From The Playlist
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…

I do not own any of these videos thanks to all the people who film these disasters and the news medias that report them.
FAIR USE NOTICE: This video may contain copyrighted material. Such material is made available for educational purposes only. This constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in Title 17 U.S.C. section 107 of the US Copyright Law.

 

Number of dead pigs flooding Shanghai river rises to nearly 6,000


Chinese officials maintain that the drinking water is still safe despite the surge in swine found in the city’s Huangpu River. The carcasses are believed to have been dumped by farmers following police efforts to halt the illegal trade of pork products from diseased pigs.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tuesday, March 12, 2013, 3:10 PM
A dead pig floats on the river Monday, March 11, 2013 on the outskirts of Shanghai, China. A recent surge in the dumping of dead pigs upstream from Shanghai - with more than 2,800 carcasses floating into the financial hub through Monday - has followed a police campaign to curb the illicit trade in sick pig parts. (AP Photo)

AP

The Shanghai government announced on Tuesday that some 5,916 swine carcasses have been pulled from the Huangpu River.

BEIJING — The number of dead pigs found floating in a river flowing into Shanghai has reached nearly 6,000.

The Shanghai municipal government said in an online announcement that 5,916 swine carcasses had been retrieved from Huangpu River by 3 p.m. Tuesday, but added that municipal water remains safe.

PIGS13N_5_WEB

Eugene Hoshiko/AP

City officials say the municipal drinking water is still safe to consume.

The surge in the dumping of dead pigs – believed to be from pig farms in the upstream Jiaxing area in the neighboring Zhejiang province – has followed police campaigns to curb the illicit trade of pork products harvested from diseased pigs.

Shanghai authorities said the city has taken proper measures to safely dispose of the pig carcasses and that the city’s water plants are stepping up efforts to disinfect public water and testing for six common swine viruses.

PIGS13N_4_WEB

AP

Officials believe the carcasses were dumped by farmers in a neighboring province.

The Shanghai government reported no major swine epidemic, widespread pig deaths or dumping of pigs within the city boundaries of Shanghai.

The state-run China News news agency said Monday that Zhejiang province had reported no swine epidemic but that a provincial agriculture official blamed cold weather for the deaths of the pigs.

PIGS13N_3_WEB

Eugene Hoshiko/AP

Authorities check the dead pigs, not seen, which have been pulled out from the river on Monday.

The official, who was identified only by his family name Gu, told China News that the practice of dumping dead pigs into rivers lingers among some pig farmers in the city of Jiaxing. “We are still introducing the practice of collecting dead pigs,” Gu was quoted as saying.

Shanghai authorities have been pulling out the swollen and rotting pigs, some with their internal organs visible, since Friday – and revolting images of the carcasses in news reports and online blogs have raised public ire against local officials.

Beijing-based writer Li Mingsheng expressed shock when he learned of the latest number of dead pigs in Shanghai.

“This is not only an environmental issue but also a public moral problem,” Li wrote. “What’s been polluted is not only Shanghai’s river water but also the spirit of our country people.”
Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/world/number-dead-pigs-floating-shanghai-river-rises-6-000-article-1.1286389#ixzz2NPNSv000

Note: The real elephant in the room: What killed all these pigs? I saw mention of a suspected swine virus, which doesn’t make any sense unless it’s an airborne plague that has 9000 pigs dropping dead within day’s of each other.  From what I’ve learned thru researching Earth changes, it sounds like farmers are having problems with massive hydrogen sulfide releases into the environment. See jumpingjackhypothesis.blogspot.comfor more information and preventative measures.

Red tide killing record number of manatees in Florida


Brett Smith
RedOrbit
Mon, 11 Mar 2013
Manatee

© Photos.com

A red algae bloom, also known as Red Tide, is currently killing a record number of manatees living off the coast of Florida.

Last week, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) found an average of 10 dead manatees a day and some observers said the phenomenon doesn’t appear to be receding. A toxin produced by the red algae affects the nervous system of the manatees causing them to drown.

“This is probably going to be the worst die-off in history,” said Martine DeWit, veterinarian with the FWC.

DeWit noted that a confluence of factors has caused the animals to swim into a precarious situation.

“It’s a very large bloom that persisted through the winter and there are lots of manatees in the same area,” she said. “They all aggregated to the warm-water side, and that put them in the wrong place at the wrong time.”

As of Friday, state officials had this year’s number of manatee casualties pegged at 149, just two animals short of the record high mark of 151 set by a Red Tide in 1996.

The FWC and conservation groups have been racing to locate and save the slow moving marine mammals. So far, 11 manatees have been rescued and taken to Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa for treatment and resuscitation. To revive manatees that have been afflicted by the red algae toxins, zookeepers have been standing in the manatees’ tank and holding the animals’ heads out of the water so they can breathe.

“They’re basically paralyzed and they’re comatose,” said Virginia Edmonds, the zoo’s animal care manager for Florida mammals. “They could drown in 2 inches of water.”

The zookeepers have also been using flotation devices to keep the manatees from drowning. However, because the manatees often suffer from seizures in these conditions – the zoo staff made the decision to schedule three-hour shifts dedicated to holding the manatees’ heads up.

Zoo spokeswoman Rachel Nelson told the Tampa Bay Times that one particular manatee that was brought in Thursday took a long time to recover, meaning that “for 29 hours our keepers held a manatee’s head out of the water.”

Although manatees in the zoo are safe for now, officials are trying to decide what to do once they make a full recovery from the algae toxin.

“We’re making arrangements to move them to other places and stabilize them and keep them there until the Red Tide goes away,” Pat Rose, executive director of the Save the Manatee Club, told the Tampa Bay Times.

Every few years, the red algae population off the coast of Florida mysteriously explodes and the resulting bloom floods the immediate area with deadly toxins – killing off manatees and fish that live in the area.

The current Red Tide, which has been floating on the water since last fall, affects about 70 miles of the southwest Florida coast. Widespread manatee deaths were not seen until last month, according to DeWit.

“We’ll just keep taking them in,” Edmonds said. “We want to save as many as we can.”

Note: There may be a time when zoo’s become more like hospitals to care for sick and dying species, also saving for DNA of species going extinct in hopes of reviving the populations after the shift, or reset point.The dedication and commitment of Lowry Park zookeepers to save these manatees should be commended and recognized for their loving service and contribution to Natures children.

 

Dead birds litter Pioneer Parkway


DJ Zitko
Arlington Voice
Thu, 28 Feb 2013
Dead Birds

© WFAA

Arlington Animal Services responded to reports from drivers Tuesday morning of about 150 birds lying dead on Pioneer Parkway.

The birds were found directly under an electrical transmission line starting at the utility pole just east of Walgreens at 2200 E. Pioneer Parkway and running north across Pioneer to the next pole.

The City of Arlington’s contract veterinarian, Dr. Jani Hodges, performed an examination of one of the birds to determine the cause of death. The results, however, were inconclusive.

Winds gusts of 40 mph were reported Monday night and lasted through the early hours of Tuesday morning. Winds, coupled with the fact that the birds were found directly under an electrical transmission line, resulted in one theory for the bird deaths.

According to an e-mail from Arlington Office of Communication Director, Rebecca Rodriguez, “The transmission lines touched briefly, causing an arc which could have electrocuted the birds.”

There were no reports of power outages or power surges in the area. There was also no evidence of electrical burns on the birds.

http://www.sott.net/article/259550-Dead-birds-litter-Pioneer-Parkway

Note: Considering the fact the atmosphere has become highly charged with plasma and other possible unidentified energy’s or even gaseous substances, wildlife authorities may be dealing with energy’s and chemical reactions happening in the atmosphere they’ve never seen or dealt with before and are unfamiliar with…

 

China: 900 dead pigs in Shanghai river


March 10, 2013

Via The IndependentMystery surrounds discovery of more than 900 dead pigs found floating in Chinese river.

More than 900 dead pigs have been retrieved from a Shanghai river that is a water source for city residents.

According to the city’s water supplies bureau the dead pigs were spotted in a section used as a drinking water source for Shanghai residents.

Officials say the water quality has not been affected and they are investigating where the pigs came from.

The China Daily news website reports that environmental protection and water supplies authorities have increased quality checks at water intakes and across the water disinfection process.

A statement posted Saturday on the city’s Agriculture Committee’s website says they haven’t found any evidence that the pigs were dumped into the river or of any animal epidemic.

The statement says the city and Songjiang district governments started retrieving the pigs on Friday night. By late Saturday afternoon they had recovered and disposed of more than 900.

 

UPDATE

March 10, 2013

China: Patrols boosted as dead pigs in creek hit 1,200

Via Shanghai DailyPatrols boosted as dead pigs in creek hit 1,200.

Another 300 or so dead pigs were retrieved from a creek in Songjiang District yesterday morning, making the total number of dead pigs removed from the creek more than 1,200 since last Friday.

The Songjiang District government said it has strengthened patrols on Hengliaojing Creek upstream in Zhejiang Province and found many floating carcasses. The district doubled the number of boats removing carcasses.

Ear tags on the dead pigs could not be made out but the Songjiang agricultural authorities said the dead pigs were likely from Pinghu in Zhejiang Province’s Jiaxing City and some places in Jiangsu Province.

Shanghai collects dead pigs from farmers for biological treatment and farmers can receive some compensation for the loss. There is no such mechanism in Zhejiang and Jiangsu provinces. The pig farmers there simply discard dead pigs in rivers, according to Jiaxing Daily.

Zhulin Village, which has the largest pig breeding program in Zhejiang Province, experienced many swine deaths this year. More than 10,000 pigs died in January, over 8,000 in February and more than 300 every day this month. It was not known if the dead pigs came from the village, the newspaper said.

The Songjiang Environmental Protection Bureau has started frequent checks on water quality since Friday. No water pollution has been detected.

http://news.feedzilla.com/en_us/stories/health/bird-flu/290395175?client_source=feed&format=rss&sb=1

Note: As per Jumpingjackflashhypothesis.blogspot.com, there’s a good chance these mass pig deaths are related to the methane / hydrogen sulfide expulsion event.

Radiant Wildlands: The forests near Fukushima and Chernobyl likely have been changed forever.


By Winifred Bird and Jane Braxton Little

artwork depicting a sunrise over a forest

illustration Doug Chayka

Late in the spring of 2011, the pale grass blue butterflies seemed no different. Flitting about the meadows of Fukushima Prefecture, their satin wings shimmered as they moved among the notched leaves of wood sorrel and feathery pampas grass. When Joji Otaki began looking closely at the delicate insects the size of a silver dollar, however, he was struck by abnormal patterns in the dark dots on their wings. Then he noticed dents in their eyes and strangely shaped wings and legs.

It was two months after the March 11, 2011 tsunami led to the meltdown of three reactors at Japan’s Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. The cesium, plutonium, and other radioactive emissions had already forced the evacuation of more than 100,000 residents caught in the cloud of contamination from one of the worst environmental disasters in history. Otaki, a professor at the University of the Ryukyus in Okinawa, was in the Abukuma Mountains west of the disaster site collecting butterflies to study their response to the accident. The explosion at the power plant had rained radioactive particles onto fields and forests the butterflies share with warblers and flycatchers, deer and bear in the rugged region north of Tokyo.

As Otaki and his research partners studied the Fukushima butterflies, the aberrations they found took them by surprise. Abnormalities in the first generation were within normal boundaries. But when Otaki bred these butterflies in his laboratory, mutations in the offspring increased to 18 percent. That suggested inherited genetic damage. Field samples collected in September 2011, representing the fourth or fifth generation of butterflies since the disaster, had even higher abnormality rates. The changes may not all have been caused by radiation; Otaki had previously found evidence that temperature can affect wing markings. But the deformities his team found in antennae, legs, and other body parts are truly unusual, says Hokkaido University entomologist Shin-ichi Akimoto, who is studying the impact of Fukushima fallout on aphids. The abnormalities are troubling not only because insects are commonly assumed to be more resistant to radiation than humans, but also because they suggest the Fukushima nuclear disaster may be changing individual species, even entire forests.

“There is no question that ecosystems as a whole are suffering,” Otaki says. “There has been a sudden, large change.”

How large and how long term are questions scientists are trying to answer as they study the effects of nuclear contamination on Fukushima’s forests. This is not the first landscape to provide such a grim opportunity. The worst nuclear accident in history occurred on April 26, 1986 when the Number 4 reactor at the VI Lenin Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant exploded. More than two decades of research in this disaster-created outdoor laboratory, however, have failed to resolve many questions about radiation’s effects on wildlife.

Now, as scientists move about these evacuated, largely forested regions thousands of miles apart, some like Otaki are finding evidence that even low levels of radiation can cause genetic damage that is passed down to new generations. It’s a controversial conclusion with an even more hotly disputed interpretation: As plants and animals continue to live in these irradiated environments, forests themselves may be evolving into different ecosystems.

The prospect of a permanently altered ecosystem is even more disturbing because of the decades – perhaps centuries – these nuclear forests will remain dangerous. Still beautiful in spite of the contamination, they stare us in the face with the uncomfortable truth that when our human adventures in high technology go awry and crash through the natural world, we are utterly unable to control the consequences. Nuclear forests may be the ultimate Anthropocene environment.

Both the Chernobyl and Fukushima power plants were located in small cities surrounded by farms and woodlands. When the disasters struck, radioactive fallout hit trees, shrubs, and grasses. In Chernobyl as much as 70 percent of the radionuclides fell on forests. Over time rain and snow washed plutonium, radiocesium, and other radioactive particles onto the forest floor. Plants and fungi soon began taking up these particles and passing them on to the leaves, berries, and pollen that insects and other animals eat. Traveling the very same biological pathways that normally bring sustaining nutrients to forest life, the radionuclides permeated entire ecosystems.

In Fukushima, many plants and animals are already highly contaminated, according to government and independent tests. One wild boar captured in December 2012 had 11,000 becquerels of radiocesium per kilogram of flesh – more than 100 times the level permitted for human consumption. Last spring, researchers found herons nesting in an area where radioactive cesium in the soil measured more than 24,000 becquerels per kilogram. “We humans can do a lot to avoid exposure. Animals can’t. They don’t know it’s dangerous,” says Kiyomi Yokota, a naturalist who had devoted his life to exploring the forests of Fukushima.

Forever Is a Long Time

Even when nuclear power plants perform as designed, they present a problem: What to do with the radioactive wastes? Some types of spent fuel will be dangerous for 240,000 years, others for more than 2 million years. Taking responsibility for these contaminants stretches the proverbial seven generations of sustainability to 11,000 human generations – an inconceivable time span.

So far the nuclear industry has not come up with a safe solution. Engineers have considered a range of possibilities that verge on science fiction at one extreme and reckless abandon at the other. The industry has considered sending radioactive waste into outer space – an option it considers attractive because it removes it from our environment. The risks, however, are potentially catastrophic: If the vessel carrying the waste has an accident, it could spread radioactive material into the atmosphere. Then there’s the
Antarctica solution – placing radioactive wastes on ice sheets where their own heat would bury them. But international treaties ban such activity and the notion of violating the planet’s last pristine continent has put a damper on the scheme.

There have been discussions about burying nuclear waste in the sea floor. One option involves encasing spent fuel in concrete and dropping it in torpedoes designed to penetrate it into the ocean bed. Even more audacious is the proposal to deposit radioactive waste in a subduction zone, where plate tectonics would slowly carry it downward into Earth’s mantle. Violating international oceanic agreements is just one of the reasons these approaches are not being seriously considered. Another is the fear of leaks and the resultant widespread contamination.

The current focus is on burying radioactive wastes underground. Finland is in the process of constructing the first of these deep geological repositories – a 1,710-foot-deep facility called Onkalo, which means “cavity” in Finnish. Engineered to last 100,000 years, the facility is supposed to be large enough to accept boron steel canisters of spent fuel for up to 100 years, when the cavity will be backfilled and sealed. Canister burial will begin in 2020.

The United States has also been pursuing deep burial. In 2002 Congress designated Nevada’s Yucca Mountain as a repository for spent fuel and other radioactive wastes. By then planners had already constructed a five-mile-long tunnel and a series of cathedral-like chambers to experiment with various storage designs. The Obama administration quashed the controversial project in 2010, leaving the country without a long-term storage site. The 65,000 tons of spent nuclear fuel from the 104 nuclear power plants in the US are currently stored onsite – 80 percent in water-filled pools, which are considered less safe than the steel casks that store the remaining 20 percent.

In addition to the technical challenges, nuclear power presents a political dilemma. No nation has lasted for 1,000 years, much less the 240,000 years plutonium will remain dangerous. Who will oversee radioactive waste when the governments of the 31 countries now producing it have crumbled? And how will these toxic repositories be identified when current languages are obsolete and the metal warning signs have rusted away?

The nuclear power industry faces an uncertain future unless it can successfully address waste management, says Allison Macfarlane, chair of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The post-Fukushima world demands redefining a successful nuclear power program to include not only the safe production of electricity but also the secure and sustainable lifecycle of nuclear power – from uranium mining to the disposal of spent fuel. If this cannot be achieved, Macfarlane says, “then the public in many countries will reject nuclear as an energy choice.”

—Jane Braxton Little

Even 27 years after Chernobyl’s No. 4 reactor explosion, much of the 1,000-square-mile “Zone of Alienation” around the power plant is considered far too hot to allow residents to return. As much as 96 percent of the radionuclides that did not blow sky high and spew across the Soviet Union and northern Europe are still right there – in the fungi, needles, branches, roots, and soil of the forests that now cover almost three-fourths of the evacuated area. Instead of releasing the radiation into the atmosphere and water systems, the Chernobyl forests are holding it, a landscape-scale model of phytoremediation. It may be decades more before it is safe for human habitation.

Ukrainian officials have enshrined this “barrier function” of the contaminated forest in law, mandating that these lands be managed to contain the radionuclides. Japan, meanwhile, is leaning toward very different policies that would attempt to remove some of the contaminants from forests by cutting down trees, scraping up forest litter, and burying or burning the debris. The enormity of that task, however, means that Fukushima’s forests will likely end up holding fallout for many years.

The upshot for plants and wildlife is prolonged exposure to nuclear contaminants, with impacts that begin in the microscopic world of individual cells. As radionuclides decay, they emit energy. That energy can damage any part of a cell. If it damages DNA, the result can be cancer. If the damaged DNA is in sperm or egg cells, the changes can be passed to offspring and cause inherited deformities or illnesses. More radiation means a higher chance that these changes will occur. Scientists agree that high levels of radiation can cause fatal damage to living organisms, including humans. The debate surrounding Chernobyl, and now Fukushima, is over the effects of extended exposure to low levels of radiation.

Some scientists have disputed the causal link between the mutations Otaki found in pale grass blue butterflies and the radiation they were exposed to, but the results do not surprise Timothy Mousseau, a research biologist at University of South Carolina. A decade of field work in Chernobyl, and more recently in Fukushima, have convinced him that protracted exposure to radiation can have severe genetic consequences for organisms living in these contaminated environments.

On an early October afternoon, Mousseau crouched on a crumbling sidewalk in the middle of the ghost city of Pripyat patiently extracting a marsh tit from a mist net, one tiny toe at a time. Above the scientist and his quarry, the cracked and peeling walls of apartment buildings rose to 10 stories, their deserted balconies sporting poplar saplings instead of deck chairs. The long-abandoned city was built by the Soviets to house the families of workers at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant.

Marsh tits are fairly tolerant of radiation, but other birds are not, Mousseau says. Since he and his colleagues began studying 14 different species of birds found in Chernobyl, they have documented reduced numbers and decreased longevity, smaller brains in some birds, and as many as 40 percent of male birds without sperm. They have also found that barn swallows living in areas surrounding Chernobyl have genetic damage that appears to be increasing with subsequent generations. Mutation rates in young swallows are between two to 10 times higher than their parents, according to one study. Chronic exposure to radioactive contaminants 27 years after the accident continues to cause tumors and mutations in breeding swallows, Mousseau says. He has found no evidence that species are evolving in ways that protect them from radiation.

Ominous as these results are, Mousseau does not predict an eventual science fiction world of three-eyed rabbits and headless horses. Instead, he believes irradiated forests will simply become less vibrant versions of their former selves. “The net effect will be fewer offspring and smaller populations until some species just disappear,” he says.

Like Otaki, Mousseau was initially surprised by his findings. He assumed that natural selection would weed out abnormal individuals as time passed. “The irony is that because the radiation levels are low and nonlethal, organisms survive long enough to reproduce and thus transmit the mutations from one generation to the next,” Mousseau says.

Other scientists have documented genetic changes in the cells of Scots pines, the dominant Chernobyl forest tree. Higher levels of exposure stunted growth and led to oddly bushy trees. Vasyl Yoschenko, head of radioecological monitoring at the Ukraine Institute of Agricultural Radiology, says that could benefit more radiation-tolerant species with significant forest-wide impacts: “If the Scots pine disappears, this will be a different ecosystem,” he says. Even one generation of weakened Scots pines would have cascading consequences. When pines produce less pollen, bees, butterflies, and other pollinators suffer. Reduced pollination affects fruit trees, which in turn affects birds. Few studies have tracked these chain reactions. “It’s not something you see quickly, and for that reason the research is difficult,” Otaki says. Mousseau is more direct about the potential impacts: “It’s very likely that these Chernobyl and Fukushima areas will be permanently affected unless we come up with some magical way to remove and eliminate the radioactive material.”

Many scientists reject these conclusions. Numerous laboratory and field studies around Chernobyl have failed to document elevated rates of mutations or reduced survival rates among animals in higher radiation zones. As proof, some researchers tout the abundance of mammals – moose, roe deer, otters, and wild boar proliferating in the evacuation zone despite the radiation. Removing humans from the landscape is an ecological benefit of the accident, says Robert Baker, a biology professor at Texas Tech University.

Baker’s research, first published in 1996, found no tumors in any of the 400 bank voles he studied from the Chernobyl region, despite radiation exposure of many generations during all stages of their life cycles. In a 2009 project with several colleagues, Baker found voles in radioactive sites genetically similar to those elsewhere in Ukraine. He says the results suggest that genetic changes in radioactive regions of Ukraine are probably a function of natural geographic variation.

Although Baker and Mousseau disagree about the effect of radiation on forest species, both have called for more research. The largest body of evidence on inherited mutations comes from multigenerational studies of Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors. It is inconclusive: A higher incidence of inherited deformities and disease has been neither confirmed nor definitively disproven in the children of survivors. Field research in Chernobyl, which got a late start due to Soviet politics, remains much less systematic than the atom bomb studies. And so far only a handful of biologists have launched field studies in Fukushima. Otaki believes the reason for that is partly political. “People are trying to forget what happened,” he says. As a result, funding for research like his is hard to come by. Baker hopes that will change. “Perhaps the accident in Japan will serve to highlight again the undeniable fact that our scientific grasp of radiation risk to the environment is surprisingly limited,” he says.

Read more in our special issue exploring the consequences of a new geologic epoch: the Anthropocene.

Pale grass blue butterflies still flutter in the Fukushima countryside, unaware they may be flirting with danger. Barn swallows dart around the forests of Chernobyl oblivious of the contamination they are carrying. For the hundreds of thousands of people forced to leave their homes in Japan, Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia, the radiation cycling from soil to treetop is an unnerving omnipresence. The forests they knew and depended upon now threaten instead of soothe, hiding unknowns where they once nurtured a community.

Kiyomi Yokota, the Fukushima naturalist, rarely takes his daughters to play in the woods as he did before the accident. The stress of making sure his three-year-old never touches the dirt or licks her fingers is simply too exhausting. “Just like that, everything changed,” he says. Amid the stress is a sadness fueled by the knowledge that the changes are human caused, that they are irrevocable, and that they will last long after those responsible for the nuclear accidents at Chernobyl and Fukushima have passed away.

Winifred Bird writes about the environment from Nagano, Japan. Jane Braxton Little is a science writer based in California’s Sierra Nevada. A grant from the Society of Environmental Journalists covered the travel costs for this story

http://www.earthisland.org/journal/index.php/eij/article/radiant_wildlands

 

3MIN News February 28, 2013: New Complex Sunspot Group


Published on Feb 28, 2013

Suspicious0bserversSuspicious0bservers


The REAL Climate Changer: http://youtu.be/_yy3YJBOw_o
Ice Age Soon? http://youtu.be/UuYTcnN7TQk
An Unlikely but Relevant Risk – The Solar Killshot: http://youtu.be/X0KJ_dxp170

TODAY’s LINKS:
Salty Seas: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/aqu…
GMO: http://phys.org/news/2013-02-genetica…
Saturn: http://www.flickr.com/photos/lightsin…
Spinning Vela: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/GLA…
Ray pic: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/artic…
US Climate Cooling/Warming: http://www.weather.com/news/weather-w…

Signs Of Change The Past Week Or So Feb. 2013 Part 3


Published on Feb 19, 2013

HawkkeyDavisChannelHawkkeyDavisChannel

This series picks up right where it left off last week. Floods, earthquakes, meteors exploding and more has taking place the past week or so. My series does not mean that the world is ending. Please respect other peoples comments and their beliefs!

Music Used
Gotith Storm – Our Worlds Divide (Remixed By Me)

Thank you Weird Weather Group on facebook for keeping up on extreme events!
http://facebook.com/groups/WeirdWeath­er
My channel on FB
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Hawkkey…

Watch More Of This Series From The Playlist
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…

FAIR USE NOTICE: This video may contain copyrighted material. Such material is made available for educational purposes only. This constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in Title 17 U.S.C. section 107 of the US Copyright Law.

ET Technology & Dolphin Die Off Mystery


Wow! Linda Moulton-Howe brings forth intriguing testimony from a former military truck driver who witnessed direct energy weapons testing in Somalia. Also audio statements from Ted Connor, a homeland security insider an ancient race of Light Beings from the “Oltissis” civilization – a consciousness that honors all life – from a limited edition book “Ancient Greek Gods and Lore Revisited”; this book on Greek Mythology was subsequently confiscated by Homeland Security in the name of Homeland Security. Why would the gov’t consider a book on Greek myth classified material?!?

Linda covers dramatic and compelling information on direct weapons technology, along with information on the deliberate cover-up of devastating Dolphin die-off in Peru in the 10,000’s in Peru linked to acoustical trauma consistent from what appears to be  Navy sonar testing, oil company operations or undersea explosions from volcanic seismic activity; although forensic evidence points to the fact internal injuries appear to be consistent with sonar activity from military testing or seismic exploration by oil companies.

Also “The Man Who Plants Trees” on the urgent matter of why the oldest “Methuselah” trees and their forests all over the world are in a state of collapse and what you can do to help offset the imbalance.

More below…

Published on Feb 16, 2013

Investigative reporter Linda Moulton Howe discussed ET artifacts & dragonfly drone technology, a dolphin die-off in Peru, and the crisis of trees dying all over the planet.

In March 2012, she learned from “Ted Connors,” (a Homeland Security subcontractor in Montgomery, Alabama who witnessed a dragonfly-shaped drone in 2007– see previous recap) that a new subatomic science called Attotechnology had been linked to the Palo Alto CARET project’s back-engineering of ET technologies. Over two segments, she interviewed “Sam Jones” who served in the U.S. Army in Mogadishu, Somalia, in 1993-1994, and was witness to an astonishing weapon test that was described as “Atto.” Jones described a kind of directed energy weapon that could blow a hole in cement from 10 miles away, and was said to be capable of shooting a target “through the Earth.” She also played an audio statement from Connors, who’d been visited by NSA and Homeland Security, over his interest in an obscure book that mentioned “Oltissis.” He believes the govt. agents are concerned because the “Oltissians” may plan to return to our planet.

Since January 2012 and ongoing into May, an estimated 1,000 to 3,000 dolphins and some porpoises have washed up dead on beaches off of Peru, for 100 miles. Linda spoke with dolphin documentary filmmaker, and director of BlueVoice.org, Hardy Jones, who learned that there is forensic evidence that the inner ear bones of the dolphins and porpoises have been broken. That means acoustical shock from loud explosive sounds under the water. Further, the internal organs show bleeding and other signs of too-rapid-rise to the surface, indicating that the air-breathing marine mammals panicked deep down and rushed to the surface for air, causing damage to their lungs and internal organs. While the deaths may be associated with seismic exploration done by oil companies, the Peruvian government has been reluctant to name or investigate oil and gas, fishing, military or other commercial interests that might be responsible. More here.

In her last report, she interviewed Jim Robbins, author of The Man Who Planted Trees, which chronicles the efforts of Michigan tree farmer David Milarch, who has used tissue culture and grafting, cloning 52 of 827 living giant trees with the idea those trees were tough enough to survive centuries of different climates and a variety of disease and insect attacks. From Canada to Colorado, trees in the high country have been dying out at an ever-increasing rate. Robbins suggested that a hotter, drier climate in the area had increased insect populations that were damaging or killing old trees.

Biography:

Linda Moulton Howe is a graduate of Stanford University with a Masters Degree in Communication. She has devoted her documentary film, television, radio, writing and reporting career to productions concerning science, medicine and the environment. Ms. Howe has received local, national and international awards, including three regional Emmys, a national Emmy nomination and a Station Peabody award for medical programming. Linda’s documentaries have included A Strange Harvest and Strange Harvests 1993, which explored the worldwide animal mutilation mystery. Another film, A Prairie Dawn, focused on astronaut training in Denver. She has also produced documentaries in Ethiopia and Mexico for UNICEF about child survival efforts and for Turner Broadcasting in Atlanta about environmental challenges.

In addition to television, Linda produces, reports and edits the award-winning science, environment and earth mysteries news website, Earthfiles.com. In 2003, Earthfiles received an Award for Standard of Excellence presented by the Internet’s WebAward Association. Earthfiles also received the 2001 Encyclopaedia Britannica Award for Journalistic Excellence. Linda also reports science, environment and earth mysteries news for Clear Channel’s Premiere Radio Networks and Unknowncountry.com. In 2005, she traveled to Amsterdam, Hawaii, and several other U. S. conferences to speak about her investigative journalism.

In 2004, Linda was on-camera TV reporter for The History Channel’s documentary investigation of an unusual August 2004 cow death in Farnam, Nebraska. In November 2009, Linda was videotaped in Roswell, New Mexico, to provide document research background for a 1940s American policy of denial in the interest of national security about spacecraft and non-human body retrievals for a 2010 History Channel TV series, Ancient Aliens.

In 2010, Linda was honored with the 2010 Courage In Journalism Award at the National Press Club in Washington, D. C., by the Paradigm Research Group’s X Conference. She has traveled in Venezuela, Peru, Brazil, England, Norway, France, Switzerland, The Netherlands, Yugoslavia, Turkey, Ethiopia, Kenya, Egypt, Australia, Japan, Canada, Mexico, the Yucatan and Puerto Rico for research and productions.

Animal Behavior, Methane Poisoning, Dead or Alive and on the move


By Starr DiGiacomo on January 23, 2013

This phenomena has been explained by the Zetas and is thoroughly documented on this blog.

While the “official” cause of such massive fish kills is often attributed to hypoxia (lack of oxygen), what is conveniently excluded in these opaque explanations is that high concentrations of dissolved methane essentially expels oxygen, thus rendering water and air uninhabitable for the fish and birds encountering it.

“Dead fish and birds falling from the sky are being reported worldwide, suddenly. This is not a local affair, obviously. Dead birds have been reported in Sweden and N America, and dead fish in N America, Brazil, and New Zealand. Methane is known to cause bird dead, and as methane rises when released during Earth shifting, will float upward through the flocks of birds above. But can this be the cause of dead fish? If birds are more sensitive than humans to methane release, fish are likewise sensitive to changes in the water, as anyone with an aquarium will attest. Those schools of fish caught in rising methane bubbles during sifting of rock layers beneath them will inevitably be affected. Fish cannot, for instance, hold their breath until the emergency passes! Nor do birds have such a mechanism.” ZetaTalk

Some of the Evidence:

Youtube video up to Jan 30, 2011

           http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ov6Flowu_NA

5000+ Black Birds

http://edition.cnn.com/2011/US/01/03…ex.html?hpt=T2

Penguins

http://www.stuff.co.nz/environment/4…ss-bird-deaths

500+ Black Birds

http://www.2theadvocate.com/news/112843019.html

3,000 blackbirds

http://www.wpsdlocal6.com/news/local…112830524.html

100,000 Drum Fish

http://www.todaysthv.com/news/local/…136401&catid=2

Tens of Thousands – Fish

http://www.wbaltv.com/r/26357581/detail.html

Thousands of Fish

http://www.cfnews13.com/article/news…rn-up-in-Cocoa

Thousands of Fish

http://www.wftv.com/news/26367953/detail.html

Dozens of fish in just 50 feet

http://www.ksat.com/news/26316464/detail.html#

Fish

http://www.wndu.com/localnews/headli…112105654.html

50 – 100 Birds – Jackdaws

http://www.thelocal.se/31262/20110105/

100 Pelicans

http://www.carteretnewstimes.com/art…3603738750.txt

300+ Doves

http://www.geapress.org/ambiente/fae…rte-foto/10282

70 Bats

http://www.azcentral.com/news/articl…ats-found.html

100 Tons of Fish

http://www.parana-online.com.br/edit…IOSA+DE+PEIXES

Hundreds of Snapper

http://www.3news.co.nz/Dead-fish-as-…9/Default.aspx

10 Tons of fish

http://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/loca…th-deadly-haul

Hundreds of fish

http://www.torontosun.com/news/canad…/16757321.html

Thousands of fish

http://www.themorningbulletin.com.au…d-after-flood/

Hundreds of Fish

http://www.smh.com.au/environment/wa…214-18wtn.html

Hundreds of Fish

http://www.bymnews.com/news/newsDetails.php?id=79520

Scores of Fish

http://www.peterboroughtoday.co.uk/n…rook_1_2224957

Hundreds of Fish

http://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/liver…0252-27879505/

150 Tons of Red Tilapias

http://business.asiaone.com/Business…31-255737.html

Thousands of Fish

http://globalnation.inquirer.net/ceb…-barangay-Ibo#

Scores of dead fish

http://www.france24.com/en/20101227-…h-haitian-lake

Several Manatees

http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/…,7714948.story

Hundreds of Starfish, Jellyfish

http://www.abcnews4.com/Global/story.asp?S=13735801

200 Birds

http://www.ktre.com/global/story.asp?s=13787277

Main source: http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UT…bca25af104a22b

Some more for Feb and March  that includes the Redondo Beach Mar 8th, 2011
April 2011
DEAD FISH IN 36 LAKES IN CONNECTICUT!
http://finalnews.ru/zhivotniy-mir/mertva…tikut.htmlMASS FISH DIE-OFF IN MICHIGAN!
http://www.wnem.com/news/27533302/detail.html

HEAPS OF DEAD FISH AT BAY STATE PONDS!
http://www.wggb.com/Global/story.asp?S=14456509

DOZENS OF DEAD FISH FOUND IN MADISON POND!
http://www.wapt.com/r/27525644/detail.html

RED SAND LAKE FISH DIE-OFF!
http://brainerddispatch.com/outdoors/201…-hits-home

MELTING LAKES REVEAL HUNDREDS OF DEAD FISH!
http://kstp.com/article/stories/s2062959.shtml

HUNDREDS OF DEAD FISH IN MEADOWS RIVER
http://www.meadowlakeprogress.com/Articl…?e=3077612

DEAD BIRDS FALL FROM THE SKY IN KANSAS!
http://www.kwch.com/news/kwch-news-mes-s…3763.story

TENS OF THOUSANDS OF DEAD FISH IN INDIA!
http://www.indianexpress.com/news/thousa…st/776492/

LAKE MAARDU WITHOUT FISH!
http://rus.err.ee/estonia/34d2ea98-cdee-…f87fc70b86

MASSIVE FISH MOR IN THE LIPETSK REGION!
http://www.vseneprostotak.ru/2011/04/v-l…or-ryibyi/

100 TONNES OF DEAD FISH IN UKRAINE!
http://www.057.ua/news/48492

PENGUINS LOSING THEIR FEATHERS TO UNKNOWN ILLNESS!
http://rus.newsru.ua/world/08apr2011/pingvin.html

DEAD TURTLES FOUND ON AUSTRALIAN BEACH!
http://finalnews.ru/zhivotniy-mir/mertvi…ralii.html

Animal Death List

4th June 2011 – 800 Tons of fish dead in a lake near the Taal Volcano in the Philippines.

13th May 2011 – Dozens of Sharks washing up dead in California.

13th May 2011 – Thousands of fish wash up dead on shores of Lake Erie in Ohio.

6th May 2011 – Record number of wildlife die-offs in The Rockies during the winter.

1st May 2011 – Two giant Whales wash ashore and die on Waiinu Beach in New Zealand.

22nd April 2011 – Leopard Sharks dying in San Francisco Bay.

20th April 2011 – 6 Tons of dead Sardines found in Ventura Harbour in Southern California.

20th April 2011 – Hundreds of Dead Abalone and a Marlin wash up dead on Melkbos Beach near Cape Town.

18th April 2011 – Hundreds of dead fish found in Ventura Harbour in Southern California.

29th March 2011 – Over 1300 ducks die in Houston Minnesota.Aminal Deaths End Time

28th March 2011 – Sei Whale washes up dead on beach in Virginia.

26th March 2011 – Hundreds of fish dead in Gulf Shores.

8th March 2011 – Millions of dead fish in King Harbor Marina in California.

3rd March 2011 – 80 baby Dolphins now dead in Gulf Region.

25th February 2011 – Avian Flu – Hundreds of Chickens die suddenly in North Sumatra Indonesia.

23rd February 2011 – 28 baby Dolphins wash up dead in Alabama and Mississippi.

21st February 2011 – Big Freeze kills hundreds of thousands of fish along coast in Texas.

21st February 2011 – Bird Flu? 16 Swans die over 6 weeks in Stratford-Upon-Avon, UK.

20th February 2011 – Over 100 whales dead in Mason Bay, New Zealand.

20th February 2011 – 120 Cows found dead in Banting, Malaysia.

19th February 2011 – Many Blackbirds found dead in Ukraine.

16th February 2011 – 5 Million dead fish in Mara River, Kenya.

16th February 2011 – Thousands of fish and several dozen ducks dead in Ontario, Canada.

16th February 2011 – Mass fish death in Black Sea Region in Turkey.

11th February 2011 – 20,000 Bees died suddenly in a biodiversity exhibit in Ontario, Canada.

11th February 2011 – Hundreds of dead birds found in Lake Charles, Louisiana.

9th February 2011 – Thousands of dead fish wash ashore in Florida.

8th February 2011 – Hundreds of Sparrows fall dead in Rotorua, New Zealand.

5th February 2011 – 14 Whales die after being beached in New Zealand.

4th February 2011 – Thousands of various fish float dead in Amazon River and in Florida.

2nd February 2011 – Hundreds of Pigeons dying in Geneva, Switzerland.

31st January 2011 – Hundreds of thousands of Horse Mussell Shells wash up dead on beaches in Waiheke Island, New Zealand.

27th January 2011 – 200 Pelicans wash up dead on Topsail Beach in North Carolina.

27th January 2011 – 2000 Fish dead in Bogota, Columbia.Dead Fish End Times

23rd January 2011 – Hundreds of dead fish in Dublin, Ireland.

22nd January 2011 – Thousands of dead Herring wash ashore in Vancouver Island, Canada.

21st January 2011 – Thousands of fish dead in Detroit River, Michigan.

20th January 2011 – 55 dead Buffalo in Cayuga County, New York.

18th January 2011 – Thousands of Octopus was up in Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal.

17th January 2011 – 10,000 Buffalos and Cows died in Vietnam.

17th January 2011 – Hundreds of dead seals washing up on shore in Labrador, Canada.

15th January 2011 – 200 dead Cows found in Portage County, Wisconsin.

14th January 2011 – Massive fish death in Baku, Azerbaijan.

14th January 2011 – 300 Blackbirds found dead on highway I-65 south of Athens in Alabama.

7th January 2011 – 8,000 Turtle Doves reign down dead in Faenza, Italy.

6th January 2011 – Hundreds of dead Grackles, Sparrows & Pigeons were found dead in Upshur County, Texas.

5th January 2011 – Hundreds of Dead Snapper with no eyes washed up on Coromandel beaches in New Zealand.

5th January 2011 – 40,000+ crabs wash up dead in Kent, England.

4th January 2011 – 100 Tons of Sardines, Croaker & Catfish wash up dead on the Parana region shores in Brazil.

4th January 2011 – 3,000+ dead Blackbirds found in Louisville, Kentucky.

4th January 2011 – 500 Dead Red-winged blackbirds & Starlings in Louisiana.

4th January 2011 – Thousands of dead fish consisting of Mullet, Ladyfish, Catfish & Snook in Volusia County, Florida.

3rd January 2011 – 2,000,000 (2 Million) Dead fish consisting of Menhayden, spots & Croakers wash up in Chesapeake Bay, Maryland & Virginia.

1st January 2011 – 200,000+ Dead fish wash up on the shores of Arkansas River, Arkansas.

1st January 2011 – 5,000+ Red-winged blackbirds & Starlings fall out of the sky dead in Beebe, Arkansas.

20th December 2010 (est. date) – Thousands of Crows, Pigeons, Wattles & Honeyeaters fell out of the sky in Esperance, Western Australia.

2nd November 2010 – Thousands of sea birds found dead in Tasmania, Australia.

Borrowed from :  http://www.end-times-prophecy.org/animal-deaths-birds-fish-end-time…

Honey bees are in trouble



Dear Reader,

“Unacceptable.”

That’s what a new European study calls clothianidin, a widespread pesticide that has been contributing to the massive die-off of our honeybees.1

This new study by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) may be just the thing we need to convince the EPA to finally ban this dangerous pesticide!

Even though honey bee populations have been shrinking at an alarming rate of roughly 30% per year since 2006, the EPA has refused to take immediate action to ban the usage of clothianidin.

But this new study makes it even harder for the EPA to justify its flimsily supported stance.

Ask the EPA to finally call it quits on clothianidin before it’s too late for our bees, our farmers and our food supply.

The EPA says it wants to delay action until it completes its own review of the safety of clothianidin… in 2018. But we can’t wait that long.

Honey bees are vital to our ecosystem and play a crucial role in the cultivation of a third of our food supply here in the U.S.

These new, scientific findings from the EFSA could give us a real chance to convince the EPA to take action before 2018, when it will likely be too late for honey bees.

Urge the EPA to ban the dangerous pesticide clothianidin NOW to prevent further collapse of honey bee colonies across the country.

While there have been numerous independent studies showing that neonicotinoid pesticides like clothianidin are highly toxic to honey bees, the EPA has refused to listen. Instead, they approved the pesticide in 2010 on the basis of a single study conducted by the German corporation Bayer CropScience, the very same corporation that produces clothianidin.

This new EFSA study has also identified Bayer’s study as shoddy and unreliable in proving clothianidin’s safety. This follows on the heels of leaked EPA documents showing that agency scientists who reviewed Bayer’s study have also determined that their evidence was unsound and should not have been the basis of the approval of the pesticide.

Regretfully, clothianidin has been used on corn, our country’s biggest crop source, since 2003. We can’t afford to wait one minute longer while our honey bees continue to die, let alone five more years!

Tell the EPA to follow the scientific findings of the EFSA and ban the use of clothianidin before it’s too late.

Thanks for all your help to protect our honey bees.

Mike Town
Director, SaveOurEnvironment.org
info@saveourenvironment.org

1http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/press/news/130116.htm

SOE-logo

 

Signs Of Change The Past Week Or So Feb. 2103 part 2


Published on Feb 12, 2013

These videos do not mean that the world is ending, they are about our changing planet and it’s climate. Earthquakes, tornadoes,floods and more has taking place the past week or so. Please respect other peoples comments and their beliefs!
I would also like to thank all the people and news channels that catch and report this great footage! I do not own ay of it.

Music Used
1….. Audiomachine – An Unfinished Life
2….. Epic Score – Something To Believe In

Earthquake Reports
http://www.youtube.com/user/MegaFight…
http://www.youtube.com/user/dutchsinse

Thank you Weird Weather Group on facebook for keeping up on extreme events!
http://facebook.com/groups/WeirdWeath­er

Watch More Of This Series From The Playlist
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…

FAIR USE NOTICE: This video may contain copyrighted material. Such material is made available for educational purposes only. This constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in Title 17 U.S.C. section 107 of the US Copyright Law.

 

MASS BIRD DIE-OFF: Mysterious Gel Brings Death To Hundreds Of Sea Birds Off Jurassic Coast – Experts Unable To Find Source, Takes A Fortnight To Clean Each Bird, Could Spread Along The Food Chain, “Disaster Is Going To Be Far Worse Than We Can Imagine”?!


Andre Heath

February 08, 2013 – UNITED KINGDOM – The Razorbill did not stand a chance. Its wings were coated in a thick gloopy gel, which solidified in the cold. Its feathers lost their use as insulation, leaving the bird’s body exposed to the sub-zero temperatures and biting winds.  Washed up on the beach, it lay on the pebbles in a sorrowful heap.  Several hundred dead birds have been washed up along the south coast of England since the first were found on Wednesday morning.  On Saturday night, an RSPCA treatment centre in West Hatch, near Taunton, was caring for 254 of them. The birds, mainly guillemots and razorbills, were all tarred with the mysterious white-yellow gel. No one knew where this slick came from.  “It’s quite sinister really,” said Teresa Donohue, 22, a volunteer with a wildlife charity. “We don’t know what it is, and you can’t smell it or see it spreading.”

Several hundred dead birds have been washed up along the south coast of England Photo: APEX.

Yesterday, Miss Donohue, who helps put identification rings on birds, was walking along Chesil Beach when she saw a guillemot stranded just above the tide line.  “You never normally see these birds sitting on the beach, but it was exhausted. I had a tea towel and put it over its head, then carried it up the beach to the RSPCA.”  John Pollock, the RSPCA inspector for West Dorset, was waiting with his van. “In 22 years working here, I’ve never seen anything like this,” he said. “It’s officially described as a mineral oil, but that could mean anything man made. It just makes me really angry that this could happen.  “What we are seeing is only a tiny fraction of the true damage, as the vast majority of the affected wildlife will simply die out at sea.” Dead birds have been found all along the coast from Sussex through Dorset and into Devon. Contaminated guillemots have also been found on the Isle of Wight.  The RSPCA said that hundreds had been found dead, while a further 254 were being treated. But along the coast, many sections of the beach were not being monitored, meaning that thousands of birds were likely to have died undetected.

Dead and dying birds get cleaned by Marc Smith and Angela Thomas of the Dorset Wildlife Trust
Photo: Christopher Jones for the Telegraph.

“It’s the worst possible time for this to happen,” said Derek Davey, 53, a volunteer for the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds, as he pulled on his dry suit to wade out on the rocks below Portland Bill.  “They are on their way to the breeding grounds off the coast of Ireland and Scotland. Sometimes we have 20,000 birds a day passing through here. It’s awful.”  No one knows why. The Maritime and Coastguard Agency sent up a helicopter above the sea to see – unsuccessfully – if there was an obvious source. Many suspect that a ship in the English Channel illegally rinsed its tanks out at sea, which is cheaper than washing them in the docks.  Any ship operator caught of doing so faces a hefty fine or imprisonment.  The slick has also struck along a valuable area of Britain’s coastline. The Jurassic Coast in Dorset and Devon is famed for its starfish, burrowing anemones and rare pink fans — a type of coral — are all found in the reef off Stennis Ledges. Seals, bottlenose dolphins and basking sharks all swim in the sea.

While Mr Davey set off to clamber among the rocks, a less experienced team was beginning to patrol the beach. “We saw it on the news, and so went out this morning to buy a net,” said Melissa Kennett, 63, patrolling the beach with her two granddaughters.  One granddaughter, Amber, nine, said: “I found the first bird. It was like a black dot and then we got closer and saw it was alive. But it splashed away. We found another two though and carried them back.”  Birds which are rescued are taken to West Hatch, where 20 full and part-time staff are working to rehydrate, clean and feed the birds.  The guillemots and razorbills are fed sprats and rubbed down with supermarket margarine to remove the sticky gunk from their bodies. The birds are then washed in warm soapy water and left to recover, before the team reintroduce the healthiest ones, little by little, to a series of ponds.  “It’s a laborious process that, at its fastest, takes a fortnight for each bird,” said Steve Powell, of the RSPCA.  Marc Smith of the Dorset Wildlife Trust said: “The damage from this goes right the way along the food chain, from the plankton to the fish to the birds, seals and dolphins. This disaster is going to be far worse than we can imagine.”Telegraph.

MASS MAMMAL DIE-OFFS: “Very Unusual” – High Number Of Dolphins, Whales And Porpoise Stranding Deaths In Ireland?!


Andre Heath
February 08, 2013 – IRELAND – The Irish Whale and Dolphin Group says the stranding of high numbers of common dolphins and other species, which has become apparent over the past two weeks here, is “very unusual”.

Photo Credit: (c) Cathy Lynchehaun via the Irish Whale & Dolphin Group.

An apparently otherwise healthy dolphin along with two pilot whales have now been washed up at Cuas Croom near Cahirciveen and there have been continuous strandings of dolphins, particularly in Mayo and Donegal. At the end of January at least eight common dolphins have been found dead on the beaches of Achill Island, Co Mayo.

Mick O’Connell of the whale and dolphin group said the strandings in Mayo and Donegal were “way bigger” than might be expected. Porpoises had also been washed up . These were not live stranding and young dolphins had been involved.

Simon Berrow of the IWDG said weather may have been a factor in the case of a small number of animals particularly the pilot whales which mostly occupied different grounds to the dolphin.

The National Parks and Wildlife Service has conducted postmortem examinations. – Irish Times.

 

MONUMENTAL MASS FISH DIE-OFF: Herring Apocalypse – Researchers Blame Low Oxygen Levels For The Death Of Millions Of Herrings In Iceland?!


Andre Heath
February 08, 2013 – ICELAND – Researchers in Iceland are blaming low oxygen levels in a shallow fjord for the deaths of tens of thousands of tons of herring.  Masses of dead herring have been found in Kolgrafafjordur fjord for the second time this winter, raising concerns about Iceland’s fishery.

 Associated Press/Brynjar Gauti – Herring worth billions in exports are seen floating dead Tuesday Feb. 5 2013 in Kolgrafafjordur, a small fjord on the northern part of Snaefellsnes peninsula, west Iceland, for the second time in two months. Between 25,000 and 30,000 tons of herring died in December and more now, due to lack of oxygen in the fjord thought to have been caused by a landfill and bridge constructed across the fjord in December 2004. The current export value of the estimated 10,000 tons of herring amounts to ISK 1.25 billion ($ 9.8 million, euro 7.2 million), according to Morgunbladid newspaper. (AP Photo/Brynjar Gauti).

The Morgunbladid newspaper estimated the value of the 10,000 tons of fish found dead this week at 1.25 billion kronur ($9.8 million). An even larger number of fish died in December.  Roughly one season’s worth of herring has been lost, Johann Sigurjonsson, director of Iceland’s Marine Research Institute, said Wednesday.  He said herring tend to winter in large populations and may have depleted the oxygen in the shallow fjord. The danger should ease in spring when the herring spread out into a wider area, he said, downplaying fears that the entire herring fishery is in danger.

“We regard this as a serious event,” he said. “We are investigating; we would like to find out if it is necessary to try to step in somehow.”  The government’s economic minister has increased funding for monitoring in the area to determine what can be done to prevent more fish from dying off. Some blame recent construction in the region for the kills.  Schoolchildren, town workers and volunteers have been cleaning up the dead fish, which can be turned into feed for mink and other animals.  Revenue from the sale is expected to go to local children and to area schools. – FOX News.

 

The herring apocalypse: Fish worth millions in exports die in Icelandic lake


Sam Webb
Daily Mail
Tue, 05 Feb 2013

© AP
The Dead Sea: Millions of pounds of herring lie dead, believed to have been killed by building work

Stretching as far as the eye can see, dead herring blanket the ground in these chilling pictures taken today.

It is not yet known what is causing the mass fish deaths in Iceland, but today’s grim find is the second such occurrence in two months.

The herring, weighing an estimated 25,000 to 30,000 tonnes and worth £18.9million, were found floating dead in in Kolgrafafjorour, a small fjord on the northern part of Snæfellsnes peninsula, west Iceland, according to the country’s Morgunbladid newspaper.

Biologist Róbert Arnar Stefánsson estimates that 7,000 tonnes of herring is laying on the shore and there are many more at the bottom of the fjord.

Both this mass death and the one in December, where a similar amount of fish died, are thought to be due to a lack of oxygen in the fjord caused by a landfill and bridge constructed across the fjord in 2004.

Fears over the costly deaths have prompted the Marine Research Institute of Iceland to visit and gather information, while Government ministers agreed to allocate money to research and monitor the situation.

School children in the nearby village of Grundarfjorour collected between 25 and 30 tonnes of the dead herring this morning for sale as animal fodder.

They raised an estimated £1,000 for use in sports and other activities through the collection.

The herring will be left to decompose naturally, according to a decision by the Environment Agency of Iceland and the West Iceland Centre of Natural History.

Nearby residents complained about the smell of the rotten fish and there is an ongoing dispute over the clean-up.

Tens of thousands of birds have been drawn to the site to feed, but there are fears the fish oil from the decaying herring might threaten these birds in the coming weeks and months.

The fishing industry is a major part of Iceland’s economy, accounting for approximately half of the country’s total exports.

 

Hundreds of unusual fish beached at Adriatic coast after moderate earthquake hit the region


Posted on February 5, 2013

Several hundred unusual fish, about a meter and a half long, stranded on the shores of Valelunga beach near Pula, Croatia in Adriatic Sea on February 4/5, 2013, the same day that M 4.5 struck the region. Several hundred fish, which can live as dead. Eyewitnesses were trying to get them back into the deeper water but the fish was constantly coming back. According to biologist Neven Iveša, it is probably Trahipterus trahypterus, also known as the fish sword, which usually live in a depth of 200 to 500 meters and very rarely comes to the surface. Iveša said it was...

Several hundred unusual fish, about a meter and a half long, stranded on the shores of Valelunga beach near Pula, Croatia in Adriatic Sea on February 4/5, 2013, the same day that M 4.5 struck the region. Several hundred fish, which can live as dead. Eyewitnesses were trying to get them back into the deeper water but the fish was constantly coming back.

According to biologist Neven Iveša, it is probably Trahipterus trahypterus, also known as the fish sword, which usually live in a depth of 200 to 500 meters and very rarely comes to the surface. Iveša said it was possible that the fish ran aground because the wind cooled the shallower parts of the northern Adriatic and experienced temperature shock and then ran aground. Iveša did not exclude the possibility that they are stranded due to the recent earthquake in Dalmatia, which could lead to changes in the marine ecosystem.

Hundreds of an unusual fish stranded on at the beach near Pula in Adriatic Sea (Credit: Goran Šebelić/Duško Marušić)

The fish sword live in deeper water that are located around Dalmatia region, which was hit by recent earthquakes and the location of beaching is located farther north were the maximum sea depth is about 100-150 meters.

Map of Adriatic Sea depth shows that usual habitat of stranded fish is more southward, near the epicentral area (Credit: FAO)

 

EMSC reported M 4.4 at depth of only 2 km on February 4, 2013 with epicenter 14 km of Trogir, near town of Split. USGS registered M 4.5 at 10 km, while local seismographs recorded M 4.1. That was already third M4+ earthquake that struck the same area from the beginning of the year.

Map shows the location of stranded fish and epicenter of recent earthquakes (Credit: EMSC)

An unbroken zone of increased seismic activity borders the Adriatic Sea, with a belt of thrust faults generally oriented in the northeast–southwest direction on the east coast and the northeast–southwest normal faults in the Apennines, indicating an Adriatic counterclockwise rotation. An active 200-kilometre (120 miles) fault has been identified to the northwest of Dubrovnik, adding to the Dalmatian islands as the Eurasian Plate slides over the Adriatic microplate. Furthermore, the fault causes the Apennine peninsula’s southern tip to move towards the opposite shore by about 0.4 centimetres (0.16 in) per year. If this movement continues, the seafloor will be completely consumed and the Adriatic Sea closed off in 50–70 million years. In the Northern Adriatic, the coast of the Gulf of Trieste and western Istria is gradually subsiding, having sunk about 1.5 metres (4 ft 11 in) in the past two thousand years.

In the Middle Adriatic Basin, there is evidence of Permian volcanism in the area of Komiža on the island of Vis and the volcanic islands of Jabuka and Brusnik. Earthquakes have been observed in the region since the earliest historical records. In the last 600 years, fifteen tsunamis have occurred in the Adriatic Sea.

 http://thewatchers.adorraeli.com/2013/02/05/several-hundread-unusual-fish-beached-at-adriatic-coast-day-after-strong-earthquake-hit-the-area/

Sources: Dnevnik.hr, Glas Istre