Shailene Woodley on Malia Obama’s Presence at “Sundance Standing Rock Solidarity Event” Against DAPL


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Sundance Film Festival has been abuzz this year with sightings of former first daughter Malia Obama. We speak to actress Shailene Woodley about how Malia attended a Sundance event in solidarity with Standing Rock against the Dakota Access pipeline.

AMY GOODMAN: Do you think President Obama could have done more to stop this from happening, done it earlier and been more forceful in really stopping the pipeline from moving forward?

SHAILENE WOODLEY: It’s hard to say. You know, as a citizen, of course, I would say that. But I’m not—I’m not in the White House. I don’t know what obstacles that man was up against. I don’t know what resistance he was up against. And so, obviously, again, as a citizen, I would love to say, yes, I wish he had stopped this in 2014, when it was originally proposed to the tribe and when the Army Corps of Engineers originally ignored the tribes—actually, you know, according to law, they were meant to meet with the tribe multiple times, and that didn’t happen. So, in 2014, I wish Obama had done something, but I don’t know, actually, that he could have. So, it’s kind of a—it’s hearsay for me.

AMY GOODMAN: Were you surprised to see Malia Obama yesterday at the protest?

SHAILENE WOODLEY: It was amazing to see Malia. I saw her last night when we did the event with Chairman Dave Archambault. And it was incredible to see her there. Also—

AMY GOODMAN: President Obama’s daughter.

SHAILENE WOODLEY: President Obama’s daughter. Also, to witness a human being and a woman coming into her own outside of her family and outside of the attachments that this country has on her, but someone who’s willing to participate in democracy because she chooses to, because she recognizes, regardless of her last name, that if she doesn’t participate in democracy, there will be no world for her future children.

AMY GOODMAN: That’s actor and activist Shailene Woodley. When we come back, Annie Leonard of Greenpeace.

Filed under: Dakota Access Pipeline

http://m.democracynow.org/stories/17035

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Cops Are FINALLY Being Sued For ILLEGALLY Spraying Standing Rock Protesters With Water In Freezing Temperatures


December 10, 2016 10:44 pm by Jafari Tishomingo

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An Excessive Force lawsuit was filed against the Morton Country Sheriff for the gruesome events that took place during a November 20 bridge attack on Water Protectors at DAPL, but the Sheriff’s office continues to assault people claiming the Sheriff simply didn’t know that the lawsuit had been filed.

Why didn’t Sheriff Kyle Kirchmeier know about the lawsuit?

Because he used his power of office to refuse being served with the paperwork. According to a motion brought before Judge Daniel Hovland, “Although he was present in his office, Sheriff Kirchmeier did not make himself available for personal service. On the morning of December 1, the Morton County States Attorney accepted service on behalf of Sheriff Kirchmeier.”

Here is a clear example of law enforcement using their power to manipulate the law for their own benefit. While this may be a shocking piece of information for some people, Water Protectors at DAPL are not surprised at all. To Natives, this is just another example on a long, long list of atrocities and lies from the US Government.

The lawsuit names not only the Morton County Sheriff but also Mandan Police Chief Jason Ziegler. You may remember Ziegler from his snarky comments defending the use of force against protestors. “It was effective, wasn’t it? We can use whatever force is necessary to maintain peace. When they are throwing rocks, burning logs, shooting slingshots with projectiles at our officers, that would fall under what we would call less lethal, same things as rubber bullets, which doesn’t hurt as much.”

Water Protectors are throwing rocks, and law enforcement disproportionally retaliates with all sorts of “Non-lethal” ordinances such as water cannons, lead-filled beanbags, and explosive teargas grenades. According to Ziegler, it’s ok because “it was effective, wasn’t it?”

It is deeply disturbing to know that in the eyes of law enforcement, we’re still living in a time when outright state-funded violence is the go-to method for resolving conflicts.

 It really is “pitchfork and torches time in America,” like Milwaukee Sheriff David A Clarke said in October.

North Dakota Oil Pipeline Spills An Estimated 176,000 Gallons


About 150 miles from where thousands have protested for months that the Dakota Access pipeline could threaten a Sioux tribe’s water supply, a pipeline in the western part of North Dakota has spilled more than 130,000 gallons of oil into a creek, state officials said. 

In all, the Belle Fourche pipeline lost 4,200 barrels of crude oil, or more than 176,000 gallons, before operators shut it down, according to state Department of Health spokeswoman Jennifer Skjod. Most of the oil flowed into the Ash Coulee Creek near Belfield, Skjod said. 

It’s unclear what caused the break, according to Wendy Owen, a spokeswoman for Wyoming-based True Companies, which owns the pipeline. A landowner discovered the leak Dec. 5. The company uses monitoring technology designed to detect leaks, but it possibly failed because of “the intermittent nature of the flow” of oil through the pipeline, Owen said.

A blizzard last week has impeded efforts to assess the spill’s extent and its impact on the environment. The creek is frozen. Officials are investigating when the pipeline, which typically carried 1,000 barrels of oil per day, started to leak.

“We have no estimate on when or if it will be operational,” Skjod said of the pipleline.

The Associated Press reported the company has declared 36 other spills since 2006, totaling more than 320,000 gallons of petroleum products.

The area is west of where the Standing Rock Sioux and their allies have fought construction on the Dakota Access pipeline, which had been expected to cross under Lake Oahe, a plan that is now on hold. The Sioux have argued that a pipeline rupture could contaminate the water supply and damage sacred lands.

The Barack Obama administration announced last week that it would not grant an easement to developer Energy Transfer Partners to build the final section of the Dakota Access pipeline. The developer has expressed confidence that the project will be completed after President-elect Donald Trump takes office.

 

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/north-dakota-pipeline-spills-estimated-176000-gallons_us_584f2375e4b0e05aded56896

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Police Departments Refuse Participation In Dakota Access Pipeline Crackdown


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In addition to the general retreat of departments, two officers have already turned in their badges in support of the protesters.

Standing Rock, North Dakota  — Widespread outrage over both the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline and violent police crackdowns rages on. That outrage is spreading even to police agencies now returning from deployment to the reservation. Two departments have already refused to return, citing personal and public objections. As if that wasn’t enough, an army of sympathizers is re-purposing social media to combat police efforts in Standing Rock.

Minnesota’s Hennepin County Sheriff’s Department is among that group. Lawmakers, according to MPR News, found police activities in Standing Rock “inappropriate”. It’s to the point where they’re considering rewriting legislation to avoid future deployments to incidents like the pipeline resistance.

Police officials, of course, declined to comment on their return from North Dakota or their feelings on what’s happening there. It’s also made the task of rebuilding trust with the community an even loftier uphill battle. “I do not support Sheriff Stanek’s decision to send his deputies to North Dakota”, says LT. Governor Tina Smith, “nor did we approve his decision to begin with. I do not have any control over the Sheriff’s actions, which I think were wrong, and I believe he should bring his deputies home if he hasn’t already.”

Smith’s comments split the state’s government, however, and she was targeted. Minnesota State Rep. Tony Cornish condemned Smith for prioritizing “the rights of protesters over the needs of law enforcement”, saying she should apologize to the cops.

Sheriffs from Wisconsin’s Dane County were more empathetic, pulling out and refusing to return. According to the Bismarck Tribune, Sheriff Dave Mahoney made the decision after a “wide cross-section of the community” decried the deployment. “All share the opinion that our deputies should not be involved in this situation”, says Mahoney. Dane County’s deputies were deployed to Standing Rock for around a week. Sources report Dane County wasn’t involved in recent arrests, a string of which scooped up an alderwoman from Madison Wisconsin.

Ald. Rebecca Kemble traveled to North Dakota as a “legal observer”, filming and participating in prayer ceremonies. When Morton County officers–if they cans till be called that–grabbed and arrested her for engaging in a riot. According to Kemble, no riot was happening. Other Wisconsin departments have been recalled, with at least one staying behind for a more couple weeks.

Many other citizens have been charged for trespassing and participating in non-existent riots, including journalists. One of the most renowned reporters who’s faced DAPL (Dakota Access Pipeline)-related charges was Amy Goodman of Democracy Now. Goodman’s team filmed dog attacks by DAPL contractors who lacked proper K9 licenses. The contractors have also been accused of unethical surveillance, intimidation, and sabotaging the movement by attempting to make authorities believe the protesters have finally turned violent.

Other journalists, including documentarian Deia Schlosberg, face decades in prison for filming climate activists at a separate oil project. Journalists from the independent outlet Unicorn Riot, who recently reported use of a sound cannon on water protectors, have also been arrested.

Thousands of opponents to the pipeline have flooded Standing Rock to repel construction and police brutality. More still have taken to the internet, spreading information in the form of writing, video, photography, and art. Among the renegade tactics is using Facebook to “check-in” at Standing Rock. According the Guardian, over a million people–even people I know–have joined the action.

It began with a Facebook post, disclosing that Morton County sheriffs are allegedly using Facebook check-ins to track protesters. “Checking in”–whether you’re at a friend’s, restaurant, or escalating resistance–pinpoints your location to a tee. Once you check in, a notification is sent out to, yes, your friends, but theoretically anyone who’s capable of watching. It’s yet another tool in the bag of tricks authorities have deployed against civilians, and are likely utilizing in Standing Rock.

Some detractors have dismissed the social media action as a waste of time. An editor at The Fifth Column challenged these in a Facebook post, narrating a debate on the subject he’d had. Editor Justin King pointed out that even if the check-in’s wasted two minutes of time, multiplied by hundreds of thousands, that equates to two months of wasted police work. Now imagine how ineffective the surveillance may be with millions continuously checking.

Morton County Sheriff’s, Guardian reports, called claims of police surveillance misguided “rumors”. Morton County, by their own account, isn’t “monitoring Facebook check-ins for the protest camp or any location for that matter.” Before you trust them, consider that Facebook access for water protectors was reported as “blocked’ during a military-style raid on a camp.

 

Data Collection Nationwide

Other police departments are similarly sketchy when pressured to speak on their surveillance technologies. Wisconsin’s Milwaukee PD hid the use of cell site simulators, or Stingrays, from courts for months. Stingrays mimic cellphone towers, thus tricking phones into providing all manner of user information and data

Nearby, the Wauwatosa Police Department, despite having admitting to “collecting and analyzing cell phone data” in its public reports, denied ever even coming close to a Stingray. It took the department 5 weeks to respond to that open records request, which is considered unusually long. It remains unknown how Wauwatosa PD, which has been blasted for lack of transparency before, collects cell phone data.

 

The Hand’s Fingers In Open Rebellion

In addition to the general retreat of departments, two officers have already turned in their badges in support of the protesters. North Dakota water protector Redhawk, MintPress reports, disclosed the revelation. The individual also pointed out “you can see it in some of them, that they do not support the police actions.” “Some are waking up”, they continued, “we must keep reminding them that they are welcome to put down their weapons and badge and take a stand against the pipeline as well.” Hints of shame could be seen in the faces of officers who confronted protesters as they blocked them from prayer grounds. As the protesters condemned officers, some of whom looked down or off to the horizon in shame.

The modern era of internet and technology gifts us with a plethora of ways to express ourselves, and help one another. Standing Rock is quickly becoming a stand out of that fact. Citizens, journalists, and activists are all using the internet to achieve their own goals. Whether that be spreading information being blocked, tracking police movements, sending food and rations or just voicing opinions. Standing Rock’s resistance is spreading globally, with protests occurring in Europe and elsewhere. As long as construction doesn’t stop, the movement won’t rest.


Stories published in our Hot Topics section are chosen based on the interest of our readers. They are republished from a number of sources, and are not produced by MintPress News. The views expressed in these articles are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect Mint Press News editorial policy.

 

http://www.mintpressnews.com/police-refuse-participation-in-dakota-access-pipeline-crackdown/222127/

The Beginning is Near: The Deep North, Evictions and Pipeline Deadlines by Winona LaDuke


By Winona LaDuke
Special to News From Indian Country and Everybody Else

Standing Rock is an unpredicted history lesson for all of us. More than any moment I recall since Wounded Knee, the Vietnam War, or the time of Martin Luther King, this moment stands as a crossroads in the battle for social justice. It is also an economic issue, in a time of economic system transformation, and profoundly a question of the future of this land. The world is watching.


As the US Army Corps of Engineers issues a December 5 eviction notice for thousands of people gathered on the banks of the Missouri River, we face our truth. Those people at the Oceti Sakowin and Red Warrior Camps, along with the 550 people who have been arrested so far, are really the only thing standing between a river and a corporation that wants to pollute it.   That we know, because absent any legal protections, and with a regulatory system hijacked by oil interests and a federal government in crisis, the people and the river remain the only clear and sentient beings.

In short, this is a moment of extreme corporate rights and extreme racism confronted by courage, prayers, and resolve. This moment has been coming. The violence and the economics of a failing industry will indeed unravel, and this is the beginning. 

The Deep North

North Dakota did not become Alabama – or the Deep North, as it is now called – overnight.   Native people in North Dakota have been treated poorly for more than a hundred years, whether by the damming of the Missouri and the flooding of millions of acres of tribal land, or by poverty and incarceration, North Dakota is a place of systemic and entrenched racism. Two of the poorest counties in the country are on Standing Rock, Native people comprise almost a fourth of the people in prison, Native suicide rates are ten times that of North Dakotans, infrastructure (like the fifty year old hospital with four doctors for 8000 people, and a now blocked Highway l806, without a shoulder) is at an all time low, and people freeze to death and overdose in the shadow of the Bakken Oil fields. That’s the first layer of abuse, aside from the day to day racism, emboldened by Morton County and the incoming Trump government. It is visible for the world to see now.

For many who come, North Dakota is something unknown. Americans fly over the state, talk about how the movie Fargo was funny, and wonder sheepishly about how it’s working out in the Bakken. Very few visit, and there is almost no civil society to advocate for the environment or the people. Let me put it this way, until this year, the Sierra Club had one staff person in North Dakota, and the American Civil Liberties Union had one staff member covering both North and South Dakota. It is as if North Dakota is just too uncomfortable for a progressive movement to visit or work in. Instead, we have watched.

After all, the sex trafficking, violence, and corruption has overwhelmed most of the state’s capacity to address it, and a recent study by the National Academy of Sciences found widespread groundwater contamination in the fracking fields.   For North Dakotans it has become just how it isThat is to say: accommodating corporations is the North Dakota way. This last year, North Dakota health officials excused more oil spills without penalty, and increased the allowable levels of radiation in municipal and county dumps to accommodate the fracking industry. The corporations direct state policy.

It’s been easy to put it out of mind because after all, it seems so far away when we view the world from our television or smartphone. In the midst of this, we find ourselves facing a larger set of forces. As of November 18, the Morton County Sheriff’s Department inventoried their troops at 1,287 deputies, including police from 25 North Dakota counties, 20 North Dakota cities, and 9 states (Indiana, Louisiana, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, Ohio, South Dakota, Wisconsin and Wyoming). Over 550 people have been arrested, many of them strip searched and cavity searched for misdemeanor charges, and a number of them held overnight in dog kennels. Now the state has fired on unarmed people who want to protect the water from contamination. After all, that’s what this is about.

To serve the convenience of a deadline for Energy Transfer Partners’s corporate profits, the police have fired teargas canisters, water hoses, concussion grenades, rubber bullets, tasers, and bean bag rounds at unarmed people trying to protect their water supply. Most of them are Native, and the North Dakota media has continued to portray the water protectors as outlaws.

When 21 year old New York resident Sophia Wilansky’s arm was blown off by a concussion grenade, Morton County Sheriff Kirchenmeir suggested that the water protectors caused it. A statement of her father, attorney Wayne Wilansky, differs: “At around 4:30am after the police hit the bridge with water cannons and rubber bullets and pepper spray, they lobbed a number of concussion grenades which are not supposed to be thrown at people directly, at protesters or protectors as they want to be called. A grenade exploded right as it hit Sophia in the left forearm taking most of the undersurface of her left arm with it. Both her radial and ulnar artery were completely destroyed. Her radius was shattered and a large piece of it is missing. Her medial nerve is missing a large section as well. All of the muscle and soft tissue between her elbow and wrist were blown away. The police did not do this by accident – it was an intentional act of throwing it directly at her. Additionally police were shooting people in the face and groin, intending to do the most possible damage…”

 

January 1 Energy Transfer Deadline

On January 1, the Dakota Access Pipeline may turn into a pumpkin. This is to say, that the Dakota Access Pipeline was proposed in 2014, when the Bakken was at a peak. The Bakken is presently producing 900,000 barrels a day of oil, and steadily declining. All of that oil is already being refined locally, or shipped out by train or pipeline. The state of North Dakota has announced that they project to have the same 900,000 barrels of oil a day coming out of the Bakken in 2019, two years from now, and even that may be optimistic. In other words, there’s already plenty of infrastructure to move all the oil from North Dakota; this pipeline is not needed. We call it the Dakota Excess Pipeline.

The Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis with Sightline Institute just released a new report on the shaky finances of the Dakota Access Pipeline. The report, “The High-Risk Financing Behind the Dakota Access Pipeline: A Stranded Asset in the Making in the Bakken Region of North Dakota,” delves into “the project’s financial weaknesses, and the fact the pipeline may represent a substantial overbuilding of the Bakken’s oil-transport infrastructure.” The report notes that the pipeline’s principal backer, Energy Transfer Partners (ETP), has conceded in court proceedings that it is contractually obligated to complete the project by January 1. ETP will most likely miss this deadline, if for no other reason than lack of clearance. The company recently informed investors that it would take from 90 to 120 days to complete the pipeline after it receives an easement from the Army Corps of Engineers to cross the Missouri River. The Corps has yet to give that permission and last week recommended further study on the question.

If the deadline is missed, companies that have committed long-term to ship oil through the pipeline at 2014 prices will have the right to rescind those commitments. “In the interest of protecting their investors and shareholders, these companies may well renegotiate terms, seeking concessions on contracted volumes, prices, or contract duration.

The impetus for striking new deals on Dakota Access Pipeline contracts is rooted in radical changes in the broader economic context in which the project was proposed in 2014 and in which the majority of the contracts were signed. Global oil prices began to collapse just a few months after shippers committed to using DAPL, and consensus market forecasts see no recovery for at least a decade….”

In short, greed is expensive, and if Energy Transfer Partners does not meet that deadline, many prudent shippers may want to renegotiate or withdraw their contracts. In other words, the pipeline could become a pumpkin, in the terms of Cinderella, and there are a lot of people who would not be sorry about that.

So, let’s be honest, all of the aggression is to see if North Dakota can make sure that Energy Transfer Partners can make a deadline and not lose money and continue to bilk potential shippers.

 

Evicting Native People

On the day after Thanksgiving, the Army Corps of Engineers issued an eviction notice to the thousands of people camped on the banks of the river. Creating the legal fiction of a “free speech zone”, in no relationship to anything significant. District Commander John W. Henderson sent an email to the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe stating that on December 5, the Oceti Sakowin camp would need to evacuate Army Corps land. The letter claims that evacuation “is necessary to protect the general public from the violent confrontations between protestors and law enforcement officials that have occurred in this area, and to prevent death, illness, or serious injury to inhabitants of encampments due to the harsh North Dakota winter conditions. The necessary emergency, medical, and fire response services, law enforcement, or sustainable facilities to protect people from these conditions on this property cannot be provided.” At no point did the Army Corps point out that Highway 1806 was closed by Morton County and that all the sustained injuries were from Morton County.

Standing Rock Tribal Chairman Dave Archambault responded to the Army Corps: “Our Tribe is deeply disappointed in this decision by the United States, but our resolve to protect our water is stronger than ever. The best way to protect people during the winter, and reduce the risk of conflict between water protectors and militarized police, is to deny the easement for the Oahe crossing, and deny it now. We ask that everyone who can appeal to President Obama and the Army Corps of Engineers to consider the future of our people and rescind all permits, and deny the easement to cross the Missouri River just north of our Reservation and straight through our treaty lands. When the Dakota Access Pipeline chose this route, they did not consider our strong opposition. Our concerns were clearly articulated directly to them in a tribal council meeting held on Sept. 30, 2014, where DAPL and the ND Public Service Commission came to us with this route. We have released the audio recording from that meeting.”

The fact is that the Dakota Access Pipeline is not complete because of the people camped on that land- whether in the Oceti Sakowin, Sacred Stone, or Red Warrior Camps. The arrests of 550 people have been at a high cost to people, but also at a high cost to Energy Transfer Partners, because they are unlikely to meet their deadline.

None of us know how this moment in history is going to work out. On December 4, thousands of military veterans are coming to support the people and the river – veterans of Iraq, Vietnam, and every war in between. I am interested how the Army Corps will speak with the veterans. The veterans join the thousands of elected officials, religious and cultural leaders who have come to stand with the river and the people. In the end, that’s what will remain, long after Energy Transfer is bankrupt and the state of North Dakota has come to reckoning. The river will remain.

I am reminded of a quote originating from Thunder Valley. “ How long are you going to let others determine the future for your children? Are we not warriors? When our ancestors went to battle they did not know what the consequences would be, all they knew is that, without action, things would not go well for their children . Don’t operate out of a place of fear, operate from hope. With hope everything is possible. The time is now. “

That is this time.

LINK to VIDEO STACK by date and events at Standing Rock

http://www.indiancountrynews.com/index.php/columnists/winona-laduke/14339-the-beginning-is-near-the-deep-north-evictions-and-pipeline-deadlines

Literally Too Many Veterans Have Signed Up To Join DAPL Protests ~ ZeroHedge


Tyler Durden's picture

Submitted by Carey Wedler via TheAntiMedia.org,

Last week, the newly formed group “Veterans Stand for Standing Rock” called on veterans to nonviolently stand up to militarized law enforcement at the site of the Dakota Access Pipeline protests. Since its initial call to action, the veterans’ movement has grown exponentially.

Last week, the Facebook event, which was launched by Army veteran Wesley Clark Jr. and former Marine and Baltimore cop-turned-reformist, Michael A. Wood Jr., received widespread media attention. This boost helped increase the number of attendees from a couple hundred veterans to their maximum capacity of 2,000.

A standard email response from the group (as of Saturday) reads:

We are happy to announce our small campaign has grown to 2,000 Veterans from every corner of the US [and] will be joining us to stand in peace with our brothers and sisters in Standing Rock.

Their event page states they have over 2,100 veterans signed up and are exploring options for a second trip.

The group has a strict no weapons policy but is stocking up on body armor and protective gear like gas masks to withstand potential attacks from the heavily militarized police, who have arrested at least 400 of protesters so far. According to on-site medics, hundreds of protesters have also been injured. Last week, a 21-year-old woman was reportedly hit with a concussion grenade, leading to a severe injury that may require her arm to be amputated. Though police have blamed protesters for what happened to her, at least one witness claims law enforcement’s version of events is untruthful.

Outrage against incidents like these, as well as attacks on journalists via tasersrubber bullets, and felony charges has made the ongoing situation ripe for outside intervention.

“This country is repressing our people,” Wood Jr. said last week. “If we’re going to be heroes, if we’re really going to be those veterans that this country praises, well, then we need to do the things that we actually said we’re going to do when we took the oath to defend the Constitution from enemies foreign and domestic.”

With 2,100 veterans signed up to make a stand, it appears police will be forced to reconcile their aggressive behavior with the nonviolent show of veterans, who intend to march toward police on site.

The group has gained substantial financial backing since word of their mission spread. According to their GoFundMe page, they have already raised over $500,000 to fund their trip, which is planned for December 4 to December 7.

Their goal is currently set at $750,000, an increase from the $100,000 — and then $200,000 — requested last week.

I increased the goal because I was wrong,” Wood Jr. said, according to Task and Purpose. “I was giving a ballpark number that we could get 500 people there without feeling like I was asking much of the public. In a short period of two days, the picture changed dramatically. As long as we’re increasing in size, I have to ask for more funds. And as long as we have more funds, we will increase in size.”

He added:

This is already way beyond transportation. So the additional funds will go toward protective equipment, infrastructure, lodging, food, medical supplies, and stuff to help deal with the elements of nature.

The funds will also go toward bailing out members of the group who are arrested during their demonstration.

As the cash and volunteers continue to roll in, the group’s resolve in its self-described “deployment” is only increasing.

We’ve grown to the point where we have an actual chain of command now,” Wood Jr. said. “Emails are hundreds a day, if not thousands.”

Anti-Media spoke to one Navy veteran, Jake Bagwell, who heard about the event last week through social media and is now scheduled to head to Standing Rock, pending his request for time off from work.

I figured if any demographic would have a big enough impact to wake people up, it’s vets. Especially when it comes to standing up to the government,” he said.

He added:

Nothing about what the ‘authorities’ are doing makes sense. Water cannons in subfreezing temperatures? Are you serious?

Another veteran, Sam Deering, posted on Facebook about his decision to join Vets Stand for Standing Rock:

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fpermalink.php%3Fstory_fbid%3D10103957681840790%26id%3D12934326&width=500

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which manages the land where protesters are camped out, issued a notice last week warning them to evacuate by December 5. Reuters reports the agency has said it has no plans to forcibly remove protesters, but on Monday, North Dakota Governor Jack Dalrymple issued a separate mandatory order to evacuate the area.

Anti-Media has reached out to Veterans Stand for Standing Rock to learn how they plan to respond to these demands and will update this story if they respond.

http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-11-29/literally-too-many-veterans-have-signed-join-dapl-protests

On Thanksgiving Week, Native Americans Are Being Tear-Gassed in North Dakota


Stephanie Keith / Reuters
Law enforcement officers use a water cannon amid protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline.

WASHINGTON ― Thanksgiving began in the fall of 1621 when a group of Native Americans joined with newly arrived English settlers to create a harvest feast together and protect each other from violence.

This year, as Americans pick out their turkeys and count their blessings, members of the Sioux Nation in Standing Rock, North Dakota, reported being attacked with tear gas, rubber bullets and water cannons in subfreezing temperatures as they protested an oil pipeline that threatens to contaminate their water and disrupt their sacred sites. Approximately 300 Native American and non-native protesters were injured in one 10-hour clash with law enforcement on Sunday evening, according to the Standing Rock Medic & Healer Council, and 26 were taken to hospitals with severe head and limb wounds, eye trauma, internal bleeding and hypothermia from being doused with water in 22-degree weather.

“Basically, it’s an act of war,” said Frank Sanchez, a delegate from the Yankton Sioux Tribe, in an interview with The Huffington Post.

The government says the $3.7 billion Dakota Access Pipeline is the safest, most efficient way to carry crude oil from North Dakota to Illinois. But the project has become a rallying point for Native Americans because the pipe would cut under the Missouri River within a mile of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation, potentially contaminating the local tribes’ source of fresh water and encroaching on land that the U.S. government had agreed to set aside for them in an 1851 treaty. The clash between protesters, who call themselves “water protectors,” and North Dakota law enforcement reached a boiling point on Sunday, when force was used to keep protesters off a barricaded bridge about a mile south of the pipeline construction site.

The Morton County Sheriff’s Department said the demonstrators were being violent. The Sioux ― who have long suffered economically ― say the blocked-off bridge is the main access point to their reservation, and they are trying to protect the land and water that have sustained them for centuries.

“I’m a prisoner of war in my own land,” said Sanchez. “That’s the only way I can see it. We have the right to hunt, fish and gather, as we always did, but all the barbed wire fences and posts to ‘Keep out’ have to come down so we can continue living the way we’ve always lived.”

Sanchez, 61, is in Washington, D.C., this week lobbying the federal government on behalf of the Sioux tribes. He is a direct descendant of the man who signed the Treaty of Fort Laramie in 1851, in which the U.S. government ceded portions of five states to the Sioux and agreed to strict rules preventing outsiders from accessing Sioux territory. But Congress soon broke its end of the bargain by seizing the Black Hills of South Dakota in 1877, when gold was discovered there ― and the government’s land grabs have continued.

“This issue could have been settled years ago, but we don’t have the money for attorneys to represent us,” he said.

The government seems to have at least recognized the problem, temporarily suspending construction in Standing Rock. Last week, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers said it needed more time to decide whether to build on Sioux land.

In the meantime, the Sioux will be celebrating Thanksgiving alongside hundreds of non-native allies who have joined the protests in North Dakota. For Native Americans, Sanchez said, Thanksgiving “is just another day.”

“When we wake up in the morning, we say thank you all day long ― for creation, for life. Things are beautiful, people are beautiful, little babies, everything I see. This coffee is excellent,” he said, smiling and pointing at the Starbucks cup in his hand.

“But people need to realize that these situations still exist in this country. We’re not savages, but there have been times when we had to prove we were human. These wounds need to be addressed and healed in order to really be thankful.”

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/standing-rock-sioux-tear-gas-thanksgiving_us_583496a3e4b000af95ece35d

Veterans ‘Deploy’ To Standing Rock To Engage The Enemy — The US Government


On Dec. 4,  hundreds of veterans will muster at the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota. The mission: To stop the Dakota Access Pipeline.

“Most civilians who’ve never served in a uniform are gutless worms who’ve never been in a fight in their life,” Wes Clark Jr. declares. “So if we don’t stop it, who will?”

Clark Jr. is one of the most vociferous opponents of the Dakota Access Pipeline, a controversial 1,170-mile project that, if and when it is completed, will shuttle an estimated 470,000 barrels of crude oil every day from North Dakota to Illinois. “It’s immoral, and wrong, and dangerous to us all,” Clark Jr. adds.

He doesn’t fit the traditional tree-hugger mold. He’s not a hippie. Nor is he a member of the Lakota or Dakota tribes, the two Native American group known collectively as the Sioux. He’s a former Army officer and the organizer of an upcoming three-day deployment of U.S. military veterans to the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in southern North Dakota, the site of an escalating months-long standoff between law enforcement-backed security contractors and activists that has so far resulted in multiple injuries, more than 500 arrests, and a United Nations investigation of potential human rights abuses.

According to an “operations order” for the planned engagement, posted to social media in mid-November, “First Americans have served in the Unites States Military, defending the soil of our homelands, at a greater percentage than any other group of Americans. There is no other people more deserving of veteran support.”

Clark Jr. is a 47-year-old writer, political commentator, and activist based in California. Joining him in the fight is Michael A. Wood Jr., a Marine Corps veteran and former Baltimore police officer who retired his badge in 2014 to become an advocate for national police reform. Earlier this month, the duo formed Veterans Stand For Standing Rock with the hope of drawing scores of veterans, as well as fire fighters, ex-law enforcement officers, emergency medical personnel and others to the battleground for a three-day “deployment” in early December to “prevent progress on the Dakota Access Pipeline and draw national attention to the human rights warriors of the Sioux tribes.” Both men say they’re prepared to take a bullet, rubber or otherwise, for a cause they believe should be of critical importance to any patriotic American.

“This country is repressing our people,” Wood Jr. says. “If we’re going to be heroes, if we’re really going to be those veterans that this country praises, well, then we need to do the things that we actually said we’re going to do when we took the oath to defend the Constitution from enemies foreign and domestic.”

The Standing Rock Sioux Reservation was originally established as part of the Great Sioux Reservation under Article 2 of the Treaty of Fort Laramie of April 29, 1868. In 1877, the U.S. government initiated the still ongoing process of chipping away and dividing the land it had granted to the people of the Lakota and Dakota nations, with significant reductions taking place in 1889 and then again during the 1950s and 1960s, when the Army Corps of Engineers built five large dams along the Missouri River, uprooting villages and sinking 200,000 acres of land below water.

When the Corps of Engineers returned to Standing Rock in 2015, it was to assess whether or not it should approve a path for the Dakota Access Pipeline across the Missouri River, a project that would involve construction on some of the land that had been stripped from the Sioux, who still regard it as sacred — although, that fact seems to have been ignored, maybe even intentionally, in the assessment.

Because the Corps neglected to consult the Standing Rock Sioux, as it was required to do under the National Historic Preservation Act (Section 106), the Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Interior, and the American Council on Historic Preservation all criticized the assessment, but the project was eventually approved. The decision was a major victory for Energy Transfer Partners, the Texas-based parent company of Dakota Access LLC, which estimates the pipeline will bring $156 million in sales and income taxes to state and local governments and create thousands of temporary jobs.

For the Standing Rock Sioux, the Dakota Access project poses two immediate threats. First, the pipeline would run beneath Lake Oahe, the reservoir that provides drinking water to the people of Standing Rock. (An earlier route that avoided native lands was ruled out in part because it posed a danger to drinking water.) Second, according to the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, the building of the pipeline would destroy the sacred spots and burial grounds that were overlooked in the Corps’ assessment. But as the protests have intensified, and more outsiders, including members of more than 200 Native American tribes from across North America, have become involved, Standing Rock has, for some, come to represent something much bigger than a struggle between a disenfranchised people and a government-backed, billion-dollar corporation. It’s a battle to save humanity from itself.

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“Mother Earth’s axis is off and it’s never going back,” says Phyllis Young, a Sioux tribal elder. “And we have to help keep it in balance for as long as we can. I am a mother and a grandmother. Those are my credentials to ensure a future with clean drinking water — a future of human dignity, human rights, and human survival.”

Young grew up on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. She has been present at many of the protests and says she’s seen people brutalized at the hands of the security contractors and law enforcement officials guarding the land where the drilling is set to take place. It was Young who got Clark Jr involved. In late summer, she was in Washington, D.C., lobbying for the military to promote an alternative (and scientifically dubious) clean energy source called low-energy nuclear reaction, when she heard of a military veteran who was a forceful advocate for environmental conservation. Clark Jr. was eager to help. He spent weeks trying to assemble a legal team for the Standing Rock Sioux, and even contacted Independent Diplomat, a nonprofit organization that helps governments navigate complex diplomatic processes. “I pulled all of the levers, and none of them worked,” Clark Jr. recalls. Then, in early November, the plan dawned on him: He’d bring his fellow veterans. Lots of them. And they’d come prepared to put their lives on the line.

“We’re not going out there to get in a fight with anyone,” Clark Jr. says. “They can feel free to beat us up, but we’re 100% nonviolence.”

You may have heard of Clark Jr.’s father. Wesley Clark Sr. retired from the Army in 2000 as a four-star general. His career began in the jungles of Vietnam, where he was shot four times during an enemy ambush near Saigon, and culminated in a posting as Supreme Allied Commander Europe during the Kosovo War. In 2004, he ran for the Democratic Party presidential nomination on platform that criticized the Iraq War and called for measures to combat climate change. Clark Jr., who was born in Florida while Clark Sr. was in Vietnam and grew up on military bases throughout the United States and Europe, seems to have inherited both his father’s commanding spirit and his progressive ideals.

Clark Jr. had just graduated from Georgetown’s School of Foreign Service when he joined the Army as a cavalry officer. He served on active duty from 1992–1996 — “nothing dangerous,” he says. On Sept. 11, 2001, he was living in New York City, and after seeing the towers fall, he decided to re-enlist. “I was like, ‘I’m going back in. I’m going to go in there and fuck people up,’” he recalls. It was Clark Sr., the decorated war hero, who convinced him not to. As Clark Jr. recalls, his father foresaw U.S. military intervention in Iraq and warned that as a soldier he would be fighting a war that had nothing to do with defeating al Qaeda. “He was right, but I’ll tell you, I’ve never felt worse about a decision in my life,” Clark Jr. says.

Clark Jr. may never have served in combat, but when he talks about Standing Rock, he sounds like a battle-hardened general. This isn’t his first foray into boots-on-the-ground environmental activism. He’s currently working with an organization called Climate Mobilization, which is focused on “building and supporting a social movement that causes the US federal government to commence WWII-scale climate mobilization.” But he’s perhaps best known as a co-host of the political web series The Young Turks. On the The Young Turks website, Clark Jr. is described as an Army veteran “currently trying to save human civilization from climate change.” The impending confrontation at Standing Rock, he says, will be “the most important event up to this time in human history.”

Vets Standing For Standing Rock was announced via an official sounding letter formatted like a five-paragraph military operation order, breaking down the “opposing forces” — “Morton County Sheriff’s office combined with multiple state police agencies and private security contractors” — “Mission,” “Execution” and “Logistics,” among other things. A packing list virtually mirrors the ones issued to soldiers preparing to deploy to the field (minus the weapons). But there are also parts of the document that read like a revolutionary manifesto. Under the section titled “Friendly Forces,” for example, the op order states, “we are there to put our bodies on the line, no matter the physical cost, in complete nonviolence to provide a clear representation to all Americans of where evil resides.”

The document was accompanied by a link to a GoFundMe campaign that has raised nearly $20,000 of its $100,000 goal since it was created on Nov. 11. The money, Clark Jr. says, will only be used for helping volunteers with transportation costs and then bailing those who are arrested out of jail.

Wood Jr. says the op-order was Clark Jr.’s idea, but the two men agree that organizing like a military unit is the smartest approach, especially because most of the people expected to join them on the ground have served.

“It’s simple and we have clearly defined goals, so people don’t get caught up in the confusion,” says Wood Jr., who served with the Baltimore Police Department for more than a decade. “One of the issues the police are going to face is that our level of planning and coordination is vastly superior to theirs, so they may end up with a problem when it comes to that.”

Here then is the plan: On Dec. 4, Clark Jr. and Wood Jr., along with a group of veterans and other folks in the “bravery business,” as Wood Jr. puts it — 500 total is the goal, but they’re hoping for more — will muster at Standing Rock. The following morning they will join members of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, including Young, for a traditional healing ceremony. With an eye toward the media, old military uniforms will be donned so that if the veterans are brutalized by the police, they are brutalized not as ordinary citizens, but as people who once served the government they are protesting against. Then body armor, ear plugs, and gas masks will be issued to those who didn’t bring their own. Bagpipes will play, and traditional Sioux war songs will be sung. The music will continue as everyone marches together to the banks of the Missouri, on the other side of which a line of guards in riot gear will be standing ready with rifles, mace, batons, and dogs. Then, the veterans and their allies — or at least the ones who are brave enough — will lock arms and cross the river in a “massive line” for their “first encounter” with the “opposing forces.” The goal is to make it to the drilling pad and surround it, arm in arm. That will require making it through the line of guards, who have repelled other such attempts with a level of physical force Sioux tribal members and protesters have described as “excessive” — claims that recently prompted a United Nations investigation. Of course, that’s what the body armor and gas masks are for.

“We’ll have those people who will recognize that they’re not willing to take a bullet, and those who recognize that they are,” says Wood Jr. “It’s okay if some of them step back, but Wes and I have no intention of doing so.”

Of course, as most veterans know full well, even the best plans go out the window the moment the shit hits the fan. It seems probable that the group will be met by fierce resistance from those charged with keeping people out of the construction site. Despite a recent decision by the Corps of Engineers to delay further work on the pipeline, Energy Transfer Partners is still hoping to complete the project by January. The segment that will cross beneath the Missouri at Standing Rock is the last major piece of the puzzle. Strengthening the resolve of the company’s executives is the fact that Energy Transfer Partners CEO Kelcy Warren donated more than $100,000 to elect Donald Trump, and Trump himself owns stock in the company. “I’m 100% sure that the pipeline will be approved by a Trump administration,” Warren told NBC News on Nov. 12.

Nonetheless, Clark Jr. and Wood Jr. remain undeterred. If anything, the likelihood of approval only makes them more determined. After all, this is war.

“The Joint Chiefs of Staff labeled the climate emergency as the number one security threat to the country, and they’ve been labeling it that for years,” Clark Jr. says. “All you need to do is put an overlay on any map in the world where there’s a water and crisis and you’re going to see massive political violence in that location. And unless we act, we’re going to be dealing with that exact same situation right here in the United States.”

http://miniplanet.us/veterans-deploy-to-standing-rock-to-engage-the-enemy-the-us-government/

N Dakota Standing Rock: IMMEDIATE RELEASE Press Conference /Medical Needs


n-dakota-water-11-22

The standoff between Native  American Water Protectors and authorities at Standing Rock grew more violent when North Dakota law enforcement elected to unleash rubber bullets,  tear gas, water cannons and concussion grenades on 400 water protectors who were trapped on the Backwater Bridge on Highway 1806, just north of the main protest camp.

See contact for Press Releases and Standing Rock Needs Lists.

 

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Robert F. Kennedy Jr. Against DAPL Press Release 11-15-16
Robert Kennedy Jr. has been an environmental law attorney for 30 years.
“It has the arrogance to break the law and the ability to get away with it. “

Is this the prophecy of the Lakota and the Hopi coming to fruition?
Hopi & Lakota Tribes Prophecy, #8 of nine prophecies According to prophecy if the black snake crosses the river into the land the waters will be poisoned and it will mark off the end of the world.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 22nd, 2016 at 9:00am CST

For Press Conference information contact medichealercouncil@gmail.com

Prepared by Standing Rock Medic & Healer Council at the Standing Rock Dakota Access Pipeline Resistance Camps

On November 21st as a direct result of the violent police response at Standing Rock towards unarmed people opposing the Dakota Access Pipeline, a 21 year old woman from New York City, Sophia Wilansky, was severely injured when a concussion grenade thrown by police hit her left arm and exploded. Sophia was heading to bring water to the unarmed people who were being attacked for several hours by Morton County Sheriff forces. The Morton County Sheriff’s Department has stated that she was injured by a purported propane explosion that the Sheriff’s Department claimed the unarmed people created. These statements are refuted by Sophia’s testimony, by several eye-witnesses who watched police intentionally throw concussion grenades at unarmed people, by the lack of charring of flesh at the wound site and by the grenade pieces that have been removed from her arm in surgery and will be saved for legal proceedings.

Sophia was safely taken out of North Dakota for emergent surgery and is currently in stable condition. Below is her statement as conveyed by her father, lawyer Wayne Wilansky.n-dakota-11-22-horses-stand-off

 

“At around 4:30 a.m.  after the police hit the bridge with water cannons and rubber bullets and pepper spray they lobbed a number of concussion grenades which are not supposed to be thrown at people directly at protesters or protectors as they want to be called. A grenade exploded right as it hit Sophia in the left forearm taking most of the undersurface of her left arm with it. Both her radial and ulnar artery were completely destroyed. Her radius was shattered and a large piece of it is missing. Her medial nerve is missing a large section as well. All of the muscle and soft tissue between her elbow and wrist were blown away. The police did not do this by accident – it was an intentional act of throwing it directly at her. Additionally police were shooting people in face and groin intending to do the most possible damage. Sophia will have surgery again tomorrow as bit by bit they try to rebuild a somewhat functioning arm and hand. The first surgery took a vein from her leg which they have implanted in her arm to take the place of the missing arteries. She will need multiple surgeries to try to gain some functional use of the arm and hand. She will be, every day for the foreseeable future, fearful of losing her arm and hand. There are no words to describe the pain of watching my daughter cry and say she was sorry for the pain she caused me and my wife. I died a thousand deaths today and will continue to do so for quite some time. I am left without the right words to describe the anguish of watching her look at her now alien arm and hand.”

A fund set up by friends and verified to help with Sophia’s recovery is set up here:
https://www.gofundme.com/30aezxs

The Standing Rock Medic Healer Council deplores the ongoing use of violence by the state of North Dakota to address the concerns of the thousands of people peacefully assembled at Standing Rock to insist on the right to clean healthy drinking water.

Water is Life, Mni Wiconi
Signed,
Linda Black Elk, PhD, Ethnobotanist, Sitting Bull College
Michael Knudsen, MPH candidate, Standing Rock Medic & Healer Council
Noah Morris, EMT
Amelia Massucco, RN
John Andrews, RN
Kristina Golden, EMT, herbalist
Sebastian Rodriguez, RN
Rosemary Fister, RN, MNPHN, DNP Candidate
Rupa Marya, MD, DoNoHarm Coalition, University of California – San Francisco
David Kingfisher, MD, JD, Wichita State University
Jesse Lopez, MD, Heartland Surgical Care
Kalama O Ka Aina Niheu, MD, Aha Aloha Aina
Howard Ehrman, MD, MPH, University of Illinois – Chicago
Geeta Maker-Clark, MD, University of Chicago
Elizabeth Friedman, MD
Vanessa Bolin, ALS Paramedic

Contact: Michael Knudsen, Medic Coordinator and Standing Rock Sioux Tribe ethno-botanist Linda Black Elk, PhD – medichealercouncil@gmail.com

 

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Medic and other needs at STANDING ROCK.

1) Purchase remaining Medic supply needs. See the full list of needs and purchase via our Amazon Wish List https://amzn.com/w/284OV04OWXQG9. You can also reference that list, purchase items locally, and then mark the items as purchased via the Amazon list.

We are also in need of

Donated items can be mailed to Standing Rock Medic & Healer Council, PO Box 1251, Bismarck, ND, 58502 – or if you are shipping via UPS or FedEx, please use the address 220 E Rosser Ave #1251, Bismarck ND 58502. Use the number 701-409-0199 as shipping phone if needed.

2) Donate funds to allow us to finalize our winter infrastructure needs, for advanced practitioner gear, for climate-controlled storage of medic supplies, and for emergency contingency supply funds
Make a tax deductible donation directly to the Standing Rock Medic & Healer Council

 

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Sub our You Tube Channel 5 million and growing!

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Standing Rock Police Attack Protesters Again: ‘He Just Smiled and Shot Both My Kneecaps’


This is what the time of the unveiling means.

When this all comes out, actions like these will be grounds for attempted murder. If the weather is cold enough, and it is proven that they are using water instead of other methods in order to produce a long-term difficulty in remaining in place to protect what is theirs to protect in the first place from those who are invading on Earth, it will be seen as an act of war.

Note: They are using water to harm “water protectors”. That is a kind of diabolical twist that mocks the honor and spins the situation into an ironic gamble of intentions and misery.

Humans were first taught how to do that, the one’s who do it are not native.

Get the picture?
Aug Tellez

Courtesy Of Avery White

ICE COLD

The ‘water defenders’ trying to stop an oil pipeline were hit with water cannons that turned to ice in the frigid temperatures as rubber bullets and tear gas flew. It didn’t stop them from coming back though.

Holly Devon

11.21.16 10:38 AM ET

Photos Courtesy of Avery White

CANNONBALL, North Dakota—Though the night would soon be marked by tear gas and water cannons shooting through barbed wire and concrete barriers, at the beginning of the gathering held on Sunday evening under the floodlights of the Dakota Access Pipeline construction site, the air was permeated by the sound of prayer and the unmistakeable scent of the sage smoke billowing above the road.

To the Standing Rock “water defenders,” an unflagging devotion to prayer has been the continuous thread in the tumultuous, months long stand-off between the authorities supporting Energy Transfer Partners, the company in charge of constructing the pipeline, and the Lakota of the Standing Rock Reservation and their allies. While those opposing DAPL are certainly determined to prevent the construction of the pipeline underneath the Missouri River less than a mile from the reservation, throughout the main camp of Oceti Sakowin the signs strictly prohibiting the use of any weapons (or anything which can be perceived as such) demonstrate an equal commitment to nonviolence.

This did little to prevent a rapid escalation on the part of the authorities. Though the spiritual ceremonies continued throughout the night around a small fire lit to warm the natives and their allies as temperatures dropped well below freezing, the sound of screams quickly drowned out the prayers. Although authorities claimed water cannons were only used to put out fires set by protestors, the one small fire on the road was well out of the way of the barricade, and the other, where medics treated the residents of Oceti Sakowin who had no access to hot running water or medical facilities, was separated from the melee by a valley running along the road.

Amid allegations that aggressive protesters were attempting to attack the law enforcement line, hundreds of unarmed people were successively tear-gassed and blasted with high pressure water hoses.

“I was tear gassed over 15 times, which made it hard to breathe and left my face burning for hours. I got hosed down with a water cannon in freezing temperatures leaving me hypothermic, and I was slammed into a barbed wire barricade out of panic caused by the police after a flash grenade was thrown and caught fire to a field,” said Cheyenne, a young native woman from Michigan, whose face was streaked with tear gas, and whose eyes were red and swollen.

Another young native man from the Ojibwe nation, reports being openly targeted by a police officer using “non-lethal” weapons to cause serious harm.

Standing Rock

Courtesy Of Avery White

“He shot me with a rubber bullet right in the belly button, and when I showed him that he had hurt me, he just smiled and shot both my kneecaps,” he said.

As the night wore on, ice from the water canons enveloped the barbed wire and glistened under the floodlights. Helicopters circled ominously overhead, and from the hill which sloped away from the road the red lights of police cars grew increasingly numerous. In spite of the hostility, the water defenders continued to hold their ground, in an attempt to communicate their message to those who opposed them. Smiles For The People, a young woman who was maced  throughout the night, insisted that in spite of her injuries, she wouldn’t give up.

“I’m here to protect the water and make sure that DAPL and the workers all know that without water we can’t live—water is sacred, you can’t drink oil,” she said. “What they’re doing is morally wrong in every respect.”

Standing Rock

Courtesy Of Avery White

Others close to the barricade chanted into loudspeakers, hoping to reach the people on the other side.

“We are protecting you! You are protecting oil and we are protecting you. You will be drinking the same clean water as us when we shut this thing down!”

On Monday, Standing Rock water defenders gathered again on Highway 1806, though some of them are still recovering from the night before. On the other side of the barrier are armed police and tanks, and officers are repeatedly threatening arrest for criminal trespassing, though the road is technically public property. The defenders intend to continue to stand their ground, in spite of the exhaustion and extreme cold.

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2016/11/21/standing-rock-police-attack-protesters-again-he-just-smiled-and-shot-both-my-kneecaps.html

Final Phase of Dakota Access Construction Delayed Pending Discussion with Sioux Tribe


The US Army Corps of Engineers have announced that they will delay granting Dakota Access the necessary easements to drill under Lake Oahe and the Missouri River until “discussion and analysis” with the Standing Rock Sioux can take place.

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After nearly 7 months of protests and direct action against the Dakota Access pipeline by Native Americans and environmental activists, the US Army Corps of Engineers, the governmental group that originally approved the controversial pipeline in July, has delayed granting the pipeline’s parent company the necessary easements to drill under Lake Oahe and the Missouri River. The delay will remain in effect until “additional discussion and analysis” can take place with the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, which has led the massive opposition to the project. Tensions between protestors or “water protectors” and the pipeline construction company have escalated in recent months with private and state police violently suppressing dissent against the project.

Assistant secretary of the army Jo-Ellen Darcy said in a statement that the history of “repeated dispossessions” of the Sioux’s territory was part of the reason why the corps wanted to begin talks with the tribe regarding “potential conditions in an easement” that would allow the pipeline’s construction through the Missouri river, the Standing Rock Sioux’s only water supply. Essentially, they are seeking to negotiate concessions to the Sioux that would allow them to condone the granting of an easement to the pipeline company while also attempting to lessen the risks of a spill, which has the potential to endanger the drinking water for three entire states and numerous native tribes. However, the only way to prevent a spill is to keep the pipeline out of the river in the first place.

However, according to Darcy, “while these discussions and analysis are ongoing, construction on or under Corps land bordering or under Lake Oahe cannot occur because the Army has not made a final decision on whether to grant an easement.” The tribal chair of the Standing Rock Sioux, David Archambault II, said in a statement that he was “encouraged” by the delay but that “not all of our prayers were answered, but this time, they were heard.” It remains unclear how long the delay will last or if the pipeline company will even respect it. Last week on election day, Energy Transfer Partners, the parent company of the pipeline announced it would press on with the final stage of construction despite opposition from the federal government and native tribes and is in the process of “mobilizing drilling equipment.” In September, Obama ordered a temporary halt to construction of the project on federal land until the corps could conduct a new analysis on the situation. However, Energy Transfer Partners ignored that request, making it possible that they will, again, defy the government and suffer no consequences as a result.

Some have also questioned whether any government intervention will be long-lasting with Donald Trump set to assume the office of US president in January. Trump has between $500,000 to $1 million invested in Energy Transfer Partners as well as $500,00 to $1 million invested in Phillips 66, a partner company set to have a 25% stake in the pipeline upon its completion. Trump has previously voiced his support for fossil fuel infrastructure projects, telling TransCanada to re-submit its application for the also controversial Keystone XL pipeline once he assumes the presidency. Even though the government has intervened once again in the fight to stop Dakota Access, its involvement is likely timed to de-escalate tensions and lure the portion of the US public that opposes the pipeline into a false sense of security that the project will not move forward. Given that the pipeline company has ignored the government’s previous attempts at intervention, the opposition must take this time to strengthen itself as further conflicts and escalations are all too likely if and when the pipeline company begins drilling under the Missouri river.

What are your thoughts? Please comment below and share this news!


This article (Final Phase of Dakota Access Construction Delayed Pending Discussion with Sioux Tribe) is free and open source. You have permission to republish this article under a Creative Commons license with attribution to the author and TrueActivist.co

Haka on the frontline! Maori man’s stirring haka against Dakota Access Pipeline


A lone Maori man, on the protest frontline at Standing Rock in North Dakota, has emerged on social media after performing a powerful haka against the Dakota Access Pipeline.

The Maori raised the protesters’ spirits at the weekend when he performed the Ngati Kahungunu tribal haka Tika Tonu to those on the frontline. He received a rapturous applause for his effort.

Many Māori, the native people of New Zealand, have taken to social media to stand in solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, which is protesting the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline — a 1,172-mile oil pipeline the tribe believes will pollute its water supply and destroy culturally significant sites.

“We need to show them the power and strength of indigenous international unity.”

The Māori are showing their support by posting hakas, a traditional war dance that the Māori would perform on the battlefield, to a Facebook group called Haka with Standing Rock,

“We need to show them the power and strength of indigenous international unity,” he says in the video.

More than any other aspect of Maori culture, this complex dance is disciplined , yet emotional and an expression of the passion, vigour and identity of the race. It is at it’s best, truly, a message of the soul expressed by words and posture..”

VIDEO

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2F100005509539837%2Fvideos%2F563868693806777%2F&show_text=0&width=560
“Kia korero te katoa o te tinana.” (The whole body should speak).

“Whatungarongaro te tangata toi tu whenua” As man disappears from sight, the land remains… (Maori Proverb)

Māori are the tangata whenua (indigenous people of the land) of New Zealand. Maori people define themselves by their iwi (tribe), hapu (sub-tribe), maunga (mountain) and awa (river).

 VIDEO Māori Solidarity with Standing Rock

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2F100009112630438%2Fvideos%2F1684599335187138%2F&show_text=0&width=400

Mongolia Nomadic Tribes Stand With Standing Rock Sioux And Water Protectors


Mongolia is one of the last countries with vast landscapes of big nothingness, no cities, no trace of humans as far as the eye can see.

Glorious crystal clear rivers, pristine mountains, where the hands of the delusional man has not reached in its fever to build, and change nature’s ways, because he knows better.

At 1,564,116 square kilometres, Mongolia is the 18th largest and the most sparsely populated fully sovereign country in the world, with a population of around 3 million people. It is also the world’s second-largest landlocked country.

The country contains very little arable land, as much of its area is covered by grassy steppe, with mountains to the north and west and the Gobi Desert to the south. Ulaanbaatar, the capital and largest city, is home to about 45% of the country’s population.

Approximately 30% of the population is nomadic or semi-nomadic; horse culture is still integral. The majority of its population are Buddhists.

Photos Source: Mongolia Live

Mongolia is known as the “Land of the Eternal Blue Sky” or “Country of Blue Sky” (Mongolian: “Mönkh khökh tengeriin oron”) because it has over 250 sunny days a year.

Today, worldwide Mongols honor the memory of the Great Khaan Chinggis, the creator of the sovereign Mongol Nation. For over 800 years, the Mongols have maintained the memorials of the Great Khaan Chinggis in the Ordos region of Southern Mongolia.

Photos Via Mongolia Live

A Golden Eagle Lands On Standing Rock, Allows Water Protectors To Touch Him


Another Avatar moment at Standing Rock. This is a Golden Eagle that landed for about an hour. Natives gathered around it and were able to touch it.

 

 American Natives see the eagle as a sacred messenger that carries prayers to the Creator and returns with gifts and visions.

Freedom is vital to the survival of the eagle and this teaches us that all people must be free to choose their own paths; to worship as the Creator leads them; and to respect the freedom of others.

The Eagle teaches how to master the art of patience and how to move through life without material attachments from their ability to sit for long hours perched on a limb in meditation.

Eagles have excellent hearing and can hunt as much by ear as by sight. To those to whom eagle comes, the ability to hear spiritually and psychically will awaken.

Eagles have sharp beaks and strong jaws that can remove a finger in one snap. The eagle tells us to mind our words and how they affects others; to speak kindly without sharp rancor.

Eagles are renowned for their superior vision, ten times greater than human eyesight. This quality is a gift of vision and clarity that should be used to help others through dark and troubling times.

The eagle is a creature of the air, but has strong legs to walk on the earth and often lives near the water for food. These qualities of the eagle teach us to maintain balance in all dimensions to achieve inner-growth. As we soar to spiritual awareness, we remain well grounded in reality as we purify ourselves with the cleansing waters.

The eagle teaches us to have the courage to strive for greater heights of spirituality. The Eagle is seen by American Indians as a connection to the Great Mystery – The Creator of all things.

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Givers of Courage: Thousands of wild American Bison appear from no where at Standing Rock


Note: The assault by militarized police in riot gear against peaceful protester’s at Standing Rock is an Act of War, a crime against humanity that will come with a heavy price for the usurpers…The Buffalo Clans have arrived to Stand with Land Warriors at Standing Rock. As prophesied long ago, the Nature Kingdom is rising with the Eagle and the Condor to reclaim the Earth from the occupiers. Remember the final scenes from Avatar when all seemed lost? Our prayers are being heard…we stand tall, we stand proud and we will NEVER SURRENDER.

Infinite Power to the people…Victory to the Tribal Nations, the League of Light and Free Resistance Earth ❤

Blessings {~A~}

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The Tatanka Oyate were called upon and gave us courage. Pilamiya Maske for your vision. Stay strong Water Protectors! Davidica Littlespottedhorse

The great bison or buffalo of North America is a very powerful symbol to American Indians. Though best suited to cooler climates, bison roamed virtually in entire continent.

The smaller woodlands bison and its bigger cousin, the plains bison were revered and honored in ceremony and every day life. To the plains Indian, our Bison Brother meant sacred life and the abundance of the Creator’s blessing on Mother Earth.

The bison is powerful medicine that is a symbol of sacrifice and service to the community. The bison people agreed to give their lives so the American Indian could have food, shelter and clothing.

The bison is also a symbol of gratitude and honor as it is happy to accept its meager existence as it stands proud against the winds of adversity.

The bison represents abundance of the Creator’s bounty and respect for all creation knowing that all things are sacred.

The chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe criticized law enforcement’s “militarized” response to the camp and called for demonstrations to remain peaceful, but stressed that activists would not give up their cause.

“Militarized law enforcement agencies moved in on water protectors with tanks and riot gear today. We continue to pray for peace,” Dave Archambault II said in a statement Thursday evening.

“We won’t step down from this fight,” he added. “As peoples of this earth, we all need water. This is about our water, our rights, and our dignity as human beings.”


Video Source Davidica Littlespottedhorse

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“A Shameful Moment for This Country”: Report Back on Militarized Police Raid of DAPL Resistance Camp ~ Democracy Now


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StoryOctober 28, 2016

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We go to Standing Rock, North Dakota, for an update on how hundreds of police with military equipment raided a resistance camp Thursday that was established by Native American water protectors in the path of the proposed $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline. More than 100 officers in riot gear with automatic rifles lined up across a highway, flanked by multiple MRAPs, an LRAD sound cannon, Humvees driven by National Guardsmen, an armored police truck and a bulldozer. Water protectors say police deployed tear gas, mace, pepper spray and flash-bang grenades and bean bag rounds against the Native Americans and shot rubber bullets at their horses. “We learned a lot about the relationship of North Dakota to Native people,” says Tara Houska, national campaigns director for Honor the Earth. “I was standing next to a group of teenagers that were all maced in the face. … Myself, I actually was almost shot in the face by bean bag round.”

NEXTIndigenous Youth Occupy Hillary Clinton Campaign Headquarters to Demand She Take Stand on #DAPL


TRANSCRIPT
This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

AMY GOODMAN: This is Democracy Now!, democracynow.org, The War and Peace Report. I’m Amy Goodman, with Juan González.

JUAN GONZÁLEZ: We turn now to North Dakota, where on Thursday hundreds of police with military equipment raided a resistance camp established by Native American water protectors in the path of the proposed $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline, which has faced months of resistance from the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and members of hundreds of other tribes from across the Americas. On Thursday afternoon, over a hundred officers in riot gear with automatic rifles lined up across North Dakota’s Highway 1806, flanked by multiple MRAPs—that’s mine-resistant ambush protected military vehicles—sound cannon, Humvees driven by National Guardsmen, an armored police truck and a bulldozer. Water protectors say that police deployed tear gas, mace, pepper spray and flash-bang grenades and bean bag rounds against the Native Americans and shot rubber bullets at their horses. This is a video shot by Unicorn Riot, followed by a Facebook Live video from Sacheen Seitcham of the West Coast Women Warriors Media Cooperative.

SACHEEN SEITCHAM: They’ve been pepper-spraying. They’ve maced. They’ve tasered. They’ve thrown percussion bombs and smoke grenades at us. All for water. Over 300 pigs. We are protecting the water. They’re protecting oil. That’s what’s happening.

AMY GOODMAN: Water protectors set up a blockade of the highway using cars, tires, fire in order to try to protect their camp, parts of which were demolished by police. Four people locked themselves to a truck parked in the middle of the highway in order to stop the police advance. Elders also led prayer ceremonies in front of the police line. Some were arrested in the middle of prayer. In total, more than 100 people were arrested. Ahead of the police raid, the Federal Aviation Administration also issued a temporary no-fly zone for the airspace above the resistance camps for all aircraft except for those used by law enforcement. Police appeared to be evicting the frontline camp in order to clear the way for the Dakota Access pipeline company to continue construction. Company cranes and bulldozers were active Thursday just behind the police line on the site of the sacred burial ground where Dakota Access security guards unleashed dogs on Native Americans on September 3rd. We’re going to turn to Dallas Goldtooth of the Indigenous Environmental Network, this clip from the front line.

DALLAS GOLDTOOTH: This is at the front line of the Dakota Access pipeline fight right here. And we are about one—about two miles from the river to the west here—or east, sorry. And to the west, right over this hill, Dakota Access is doing construction, trying to get to this road right here. So there is a police line on top of the hill here with Dakota Access workers and police protecting the workers.

AMY GOODMAN: That’s Dallas Goldtooth. And before that, you hear the LRAD, the long-range acoustic device.

For more, we’re joined by Tara Houska, national campaigns director for Honor the Earth.

Welcome back to Democracy Now!, Tara. Explain what took place yesterday, I mean, the video and the photos that we have of the military hardware, a raid against the protesters.

TARA HOUSKA: Yesterday we saw that—you know, we saw—we learned a lot about the relationship of people to fossil fuels. We learned a lot about the relationship of North Dakota to Native people. And we learned a lot about America and where we stand.

Yesterday, we saw folks being maced. I was standing right next to a group of teenagers that were all maced in the face, maced right—like all kinds of people. Myself, I actually was almost shot in the face by bean bag round. It ricocheted off a truck right next to my head. These police were actively trying to hurt people, pushing them back to allow construction of the Dakota Access pipeline. They were defending monetary interests as human beings were being physically hurt. You know, I saw—I saw, right in front of me, a group of police officers pull a protester forward and begin beating him over the head with sticks. There’s video of it that you can see. I mean, this was an all-out war that was waged on indigenous protectors that were doing nothing more than peacefully assembling. There was no fires, there was nothing like that, until the police began their violent attack on us.

JUAN GONZÁLEZ: And, Tara, where was this incident in—for instance, in relationship to the September 3rd dog attacks at the tribal burial site?

TARA HOUSKA: When Dakota Access jumped ahead over 20 miles to destroy the site that had just been identified by the tribe the day before as a sacred place, that happened on September 3rd. That’s also the anniversary of the Whitestone Hill massacre. That was the exact place the day that Dakota Access was basically constructing its pipeline, right in the background, as literally hundreds and hundreds of people came to stand and pray and bring all of their energy forward to stop this from happening. And it was right at that site where Native American men, women and children had been attacked by private security, by dogs and mace and all the same things that we saw yesterday—this incredible escalated violence against people that were doing nothing more than trying to stop the destruction of sacred sites right in front of their eyes.

AMY GOODMAN: Tara, you saw rifles aimed directly at people, police aiming those rifles?

TARA HOUSKA: Yes, there were police walking around everywhere with assault rifles. Directly across from us, there was actually a policeman holding his rifle trained on us, directly on us. Bean bag rifle assault—bean bag non-lethal weapons were also aimed at us. Every time we put our hands up, they’d put them down. As soon as our hands came down, they would aim back at us. Police officers were smiling at us as they were doing these things. There were police officers filming this, laughing, as they—as human beings were being attacked, being maced. I mean, it was a nightmarish scene. And it should be a shame to the federal government, it should be a shame to the American people, that this is happening within U.S. borders to indigenous people and to our allies, to all people that are trying to protect water. Yesterday was a really shameful moment for this country and where we stand.

AMY GOODMAN: And the number of people you estimate were arrested, Tara?

TARA HOUSKA: I saw dozens of people being arrested. I mean, they were just pulling people out and arresting them. You know, I saw—I actually had to get pulled back from a group that—I mean, the police were pushing forward and just grabbing people at will. We had a number of lockdowns, like that were right in front of us in this truck in the middle of the road, that was used to attempt to blockade these police from advancing forward. There were five people, actually, that were locked to that. They attempted to construct a tipi in the middle, right behind people that were praying and singing. And they—there were folks that locked down to that tipi, or attempted to. The police ripped that tipi down and ripped those people out. It was—it was a really horrible scene yesterday.

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This is the Man Militarized Police at Standing Rock are Working For


Note: The only thing that impacts the elite is being publicly SHAMED, please feel free to SHAME & SHARE 🙂

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Isaac Davis, Staff Writer
Waking Times

The months long Dakota Access Keystone XL pipleine protest at the Standing Rock Indian Reservation by Native Americans and those sympathetic to protection of our water supply has been met with heavy-handed and brutal clamp down by police and national guard. Militarized goons in battle dress have stormed protector camps with LRAD sonic weapons, attack dogs, tear gas, tazers, and even live ammunition (killing horses), while politicians and mainstream media do their best to ignore this growing atrocity, hoping to wait it out until the protestors give up.

But, as the saying goes, Water Is Life, and the issue of life and death is at the root of this protection movement, therefore, for people concerned with life, giving up on this is simply unthinkable. The root issue justifying state oppression of the protest is capitalism, and the perception that money is more important than life itself. When the police and national guard attack U.S. citizens on private property to protect corporate interests, who are they really working for?

The corporate dream of the Keystone XL pipeline is to create a profit stream for a small number of people at the expense of the natural world and anyone in the way. At the top of this pyramid of profit is Texas billionaire Kelcy Warren, CEO of Energy Transfer Partners, the company responsible for the project.

So who is Kelcy Warren?

A native of East Texas and graduate of the University of Texas at Arlington with a degree in civil engineering, Warren worked in the natural gas industry and became co-chair of Energy Transfer Equity in 2007. With business partner Ray Davis, co-owner of the Texas Rangers baseball team, Warren built Energy Transfer Equity into one of the nation’s largest pipeline companies, which now owns about 71,000 miles of pipelines carrying natural gas, natural gas liquids, refined products and crude oil. The company’s holdings include Sunoco, Southern Union and Regency Energy Partners.

Forbes estimates the 60-year-old Warren’s personal wealth at $4 billion. Bloomberg described him as “among America’s new shale tycoons” — but rather than building a fortune by drilling he “takes the stuff others pull from underground and moves it from one place to another, chilling, boiling, pressurizing, and processing it until it’s worth more than when it burst from the wellhead.” [Source]

Shockingly, in 2015 the governor of Texas, Greg Abbott, appointed Warren to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission which is an insult to environmentalists working to protect Big Bend National Park and surrounding sacred tribal lands from another $770 million pipeline project.

“According to the governor’s office, the state parks and wildlife commission “manages and conserves the natural and cultural resources of Texas,” along with ensuring the future of hunting, fishing and outdoor recreation opportunities for Texans.” [Source]

This glaring conflict of interest has inspired Environmental Science major at UTSA and former Texas State Park Ambassador Andrew Lucas to begin a drive to have Warren removed from this environmental post. His petition is described here:

Most people may know Kelcy Warren as the man behind the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline. The Dallas-based billionaire and CEO of Energy Transfer Partners has been making headlines for fast-tracking a 1100 mile crude oil pipeline across the Midwest and under the Missouri River, just north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. No environmental impact assessment, no respect for cultural sites, and no regard for the local and widespread communities living along the river. A similar story is unfolding out in West Texas, where Warren’s company has split through the pristine Big Bend region with the 200 mile Comanche Trail Pipeline and nearly-complete 143 mile Trans Pecos Pipeline. These Pipelines mark the way for massive natural gas and oil developments in the Trans Pecos region.

With untold damages unfolding for cultural and environmental resources at the hands of Energy Transfer Partners, it would surprise most to know that nearly a year ago, Texas Governor Greg Abbott appointed Kelcy Warren for a 6 year term as 1 of the 10 commissioners who preside over Texas Parks And Wildlife…  Why? Probably the $550,000 in campaign contributions Abbott received from Warren.

Read More…

Footage of militarized police using the Long Range Acoustic Device (LRAD) crowd control weapon against protectors at standing rock on October 27th, 2016:

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Final Thoughts

Warren is listed as number 150 on Forbes list of wealthiest Americans with an estimated net worth of $4.2 billion in September of 2016. He is the head of the Dakota Access Pipeline snake.

If you are scratching your head wondering why militarized police and private security contractors are beating, gassing and attacking peaceful resistors, including women, children and the elderly, the answer is, they are doing it to protect the interests of Kelcy Warren and others invested in this pipeline project.

Read more articles by Isaac Davis.

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First Nations across North America sign treaty alliance against the oilsands


The thunderous pounding of Indigenous drums echoed in the air on Thursday as more than 50 Indigenous nations across North America rallied together to sign a historic, pan-continental treaty alliance against oilsands expansion in their traditional territory.

The collaboration, formalized at simultaneous ceremonies in Quebec and B.C., aims to block all proposed pipeline, tanker, and rail projects affecting First Nations land and water, including TransCanada’s Energy East pipeline, Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain expansion, Enbridge’s Line 3 pipeline, and Enbridge Northern Gateway.

At the signing on Musqueam land in Vancouver, the lineup of chiefs waiting to put their names down filled up an entire room. It was a powerful ceremony, and participants clad in the regalia of their nations travelled from across B.C. and northern Washington to be part of the growing movement.

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip of the Union of BC Indian Chiefs, who also signed the document, said Indigenous people will no longer stand for dangerous projects on their territory that advance the threat of climate change.

“In this time of great challenge we know that other First Nations will sign on,” he said, extending the invitation to Indigenous communities far and wide.

“Based on our sovereign, inherent right to self-determination, we have collectively decided that we will pick up our sacred responsibilities to the land, waters, and people. We will come together in unity and solidarity to protect our territory from the predations of big oil interests, industry, and everything that represents.”

It’s a movement that’s already happening, he added, with no better example than in North Dakota, where the Standing Rock Sioux have forced the federal government to pause Dakota Access pipeline construction.

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip, Kinder Morgan, Trans Mountain expansion, Union of BC Indian Chiefs
Grand Chief Stewart Phillip of the Union of BC Indian Chiefs signs the Treaty Alliance Against Tar Sands Expansion in Vancouver, B.C. on Thurs. Sept. 22, 2016. Photo by Elizabeth McSheffrey.

Meeting the call to climate change duty

The document, called the Treaty Alliance Against Tar Sands Expansion, commits its signatories to assist one another when called upon in the battle against oilsands expansion, and to work in partnership to move society towards more sustainable lifestyles. By aligning themselves with other Indigenous nations across Canada and the northern U.S., participants hope to ensure that dangerous projects are not able to “escape” by using alternative routes.

“We have the right and the responsibility to stop these major threats to our lands, our waters and our peoples,” said Kanesatake Grand Chief Serge Simon. “For example, from Quebec, we will work with our First Nation allies in B.C. to make sure that the Kinder Morgan pipeline does not pass, and we know they’ll help us do the same against Energy East.”

It comes not only from a legal and cultural responsibility to protect their land, water, air, and climate from harm, said Grand Chief Derek Nepinak of the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs, but a desire to safeguard a future for all peoples, Indigenous and non-Indigenous as well.

“We want to work with the Prime Minister and the government to develop a sustainable economy that does not marginalize our people,” he said. “This is a time of great spiritual awakening for our peoples as we reinvigorate our Nations and ensure a better tomorrow for all.”

While First Nations, environmentalists and other key stakeholders across North America argue that pipelines, tankers, and oil by rail increase the risk of catastrophic oil spills, threaten critical marine and terrestrial ecosystems, and put international climate targets out of reach, energy companies argue that they will revitalize struggling Canadian economies by bringing energy to overseas markets.

The energy companies also argue that their proposed projects promote responsible resources development. The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers however, Canada’s largest oil and gas lobby group, said the Treaty Alliance will not change the way its members do business with Indigenous communities.

Chief Terry Teegee, Carrier Sekani Nation, Prince George
Chief Terry Teegee of the Carrier Sekani Tribal Council in Prince George, B.C. calls all First Nations to stand together in the fight against oilsands expansion, Thurs. Sept. 22, 2016 in Vancouver. Photo by Elizabeth McSheffrey.

Oil and gas industry to carry on

“Our member companies work with First Nations and Metis communities all the time, regularly, and have a long history of doing that,” said Brian McGuigan, CAPP’s manager of aboriginal policy. “We’ll continue to work with them. Members work with them everyday and have very positive relationships… It’s not always easy conversations, but they continue the dialogue.”

He would not comment on whether he felt the newly-signed document would hinder CAPP’s goal of getting Canadian oil to tidewater.

The new treaty builds on a series of major First Nations victories against oilsands expansion projects, including a Federal Court of Appeal decision in June that overturned the Harper government’s approval of the Enbridge Northern Gateway project, and rallies across the continent that contributed to U.S. President Barack Obama’s decision to kill the Keystone XL pipeline.

American signatories to the treaty include the Standing Rock Sioux, who are fighting Dakota Access Pipeline, the Lummi Nation in Washington, which is currently fighting the Trans Mountain expansion, and the White Earth Nation in Minnesota, which has launched a legal complaint against the Enbridge Line 3 program. Canadian signatories include B.C.’s Katzie First Nation, Tsleil-Waututh Nation, Carrier Sekani Tribal Council, Wet’suwet’en First Nation, and Heiltsuk First Nation, among others.

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A sample of pipeline projects affecting Indigenous communities across North America. Graphic courtesy of the Treaty Alliance Against Tar Sands Expansion.

Here’s what the treaty says:

“Therefore, our Nations hereby join together under the present treaty to officially prohibit and to agree to collectively challenge and resist the use of our respective territories and coasts in connection with the expansion of the production of the Alberta Tar Sands, including for the transport of such expanded production, whether by pipeline, rail or tanker.

As sovereign Indigenous Nations, we enter this treaty pursuant to our inherent legal authority and responsibility to protect our respective territories from threats to our lands, waters, air and climate, but we do so knowing full well that it is in the best interest of all peoples, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous, to put a stop to the threat of Tar Sands expansion.

We wish to work in collaboration with all peoples and all governments in building a more equitable and sustainable future, one that will produce healthier and more prosperous communities across Turtle Island and beyond, as well as preserve and protect our peoples’ way of life.”

WATCH: The signing ceremony in Vancouver

Indigenous chiefs from across B.C. sign a pan-continental Treaty Alliance Against Tar Sands Expansion in Vancouver on Thurs. Sept. 22, 2016. Video by Elizabeth McSheffrey.

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Black Elk vision of Seventh Generation prophecy is happening at Sacred Stone Camp


The Sacred Stone Camp near Cannonball has been housing demonstrators who oppose the Dakota Access Pipeline since late May.

The tent city has quickly grown with representatives of approximately sixty tribes at the site along with individuals from all over the world.

The size of this gathering has come as a surprise to many, but for some Native Americans, this assembly has been anticipated for Seven Generations.

Dakota Goodhouse is one of those who sees coincidences between the past and present.

He teaches a course on Native American Studies at United Tribes Technical College. He’s very familiar with the Seventh Generation prophecy, attributed to Black Elk and other tribal leaders in the late 1800s.

Black Elk’s dream is that this illusion of many hoops will go away and we’ll all see one hoop again,” said Goodhouse.

Goodhouse says, the vision Black Elk foretold depicted a great coming together of Native Americans.

He says the dream also included a reuniting of all races of people.

The Lakota Holy Man saw races represented by hoops and in Seven Generations he saw all hoops becoming one.

“I have to wonder if we’re living in that time now? I do see a resurgence in language and culture in history; it’s nice to see the illusion of many hoops being broken,” said Goodhouse.

The students in his class believe the Sacred Stone Camp is the fulfillment of the Seventh Generation prophecy.

“I think it’s really awesome to see all our different tribes coming together and putting their difference aside. This time, right here, right now is where we all need to come together,” said Katrina Her Many Horses, of Pine Ridge, S.D.

Melvin Miner of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe agrees.

“I think what’s going on with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and the Dakota Access Pipeline conflict, you could say there has been an awakening and awareness that the prophecy is coming to light,” said Miner.

The belief that the Sacred Stone Camp is part of a 125-year-old prophecy elevates the cause for which the water protectors have come together.
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Media Black-out: Militarized Police Raid Dakota Protest To Break Up Peaceful Prayer Circle — Please Help Spread This Story




(Stillness in the Storm Editor) “All is being revealed.” Peaceful “protestors” were holding prayer and the police-state sent in militarized troops to disburse the gathering. While this is obviously troubling, it is making plain to see for the sleeping masses how nazi-like the world as become—especially the so-called land of the free and home of the brave. But without your help to share this story, we can’t alert others as to the grievous nature of what is taking place.This event is helping draw awareness to the current state of affairs, which is that we are considered enemies of the state. In this case, the people who are fighting big business for the basic human right of clean water are being trampled under the foot of tyranny. But when good people do something, evil cannot flourish.Thank you to those brave souls who attended this event and helped play their part in revealing the true nature of government for the world to see. The fact that those gathered were completely peaceful and non-violent lets everyone who sees this story know that things are not right and change is needed. Hence, the media black-out trying to keep it quiet ensure the sleeping masses don’t become aware.

Please do your part to share this story far and wide, especially with those sleeping friends and family who still think we live in a “free world.” When the illusion of freedom has been dispelled the sleeping giant will rise to secure the freedom that has always been waiting in the wings.

– Justin

SourceThe Free Thought Project

by Claire Bernish, September 29th 2016

Heavily-militarized police decked in riot gear and armed to the teeth, arrived by MRAP and other military-grade vehicles to a Dakota Access Pipeline construction site — not to crack down on a violent and destructive riot—but to break up … a peaceful prayer gathering.

Members of the Standing Rock Sioux and other Native American Nations and their supporters had gathered to pray and sing songs at the construction site Wednesday, when Morton County, North Dakota, Sheriff’s Office deployed an insanely disproportionate response to break up the unarmed and otherwise wholly peaceful gathering.
Witness and participant Thomas H. Joseph II broadcast the inexplicable law enforcement action using Facebook Live. In his post to the social media platform, noting women and children’s lives were threatened by the crackdown, he wrote:

“We gathered in prayer, un-armed, prayed, sang songs, and attempted to leave. No threats, No vandalism, No violence was taken on our part.”


Related Vatican Connections to the Dakota Access Pipeline and Truth that We’re “All Enemies of the State” – The Standoff between Corporate Kleptocracy and the Enduring Spirit of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe

At least 21 people were arrested in the needless clash — but divergent accounts from law enforcement and witnesses show continued misperceptions about the insidious pipeline which has drawn national attention despite a dearth of corporate media coverage.

Despite repeatedly proven claims from the over 7,000 water protectors — the term preferred over ‘protesters,’ since the pipeline slated to run beneath the Missouri River threatens to contaminate the tribal water supply and that of some 18 million people — that they are unarmed, both corporate and state response has treated them as terrorists.

A post to Facebook from Sacred Stone Camp — which, in April, became the first of a growing number of encampments intended to peacefully block pipeline construction crews — stated North Dakota law enforcement “deployed armed personnel with shotguns and assault rifles, military vehicles, and what looks like an aerial spray on peaceful Water Protectors gathered in prayer.”

“We had a really nice ceremony,” said a Sicangu Lakota grandmother in video footage from the scene. “Then we looked and over that way, there were a few police and the next thing we knew there were 40 police all in riot gear.”

Video indeed shows a number of armored vehicles blocking the road, as officers fit more for the streets of war-ravaged Aleppo advance on the gathering, and a helicopter hovers overhead.

Police swarmed the group — as water protectors and attendees stood calmly with hands clearly raised — and began indiscriminately accosting people while ordering everyone into their vehicles.

At least one officer pointed his weapon at an unarmed person, when, as the Morton County Sheriff’s Department alleged afterward in a statement, “a protester on horseback charged at an officer in what was viewed as an act of aggression.”
Video would seem to dispute this claim, as a number of people ride horses around the scene, but none appears to charge directly at any of the militarized cops.

VIDEO

Police admitted to the militarized deployment via a statement posted on social media, but clarified — amid doubts from those at the scene — the small plane was only a local crop duster spraying in the area.

Under the pretense the water protectors were trespassing on private property — and although those in attendance were only blocked and accosted once they began to disburse — the Morton County Sheriff’s Office acknowledged it sent armored vehicles, specialized equipment, and “less lethal ammunition using bean-bag rounds” to force people from the area.

However measured law enforcement’s official statements appeared, witnesses to the absurd and unnecessary action painted an entirely different picture of the incident.

As Red Warrior Camp alarmingly summarized in a statement on its Facebook page:

“Today Native ceremonies conducted along the Dakota Access Pipeline route were disrupted by militarized police. We have continued to declare ourselves to be non-violent and unarmed, the police, acting as private security and protectors of the corporations and their nefarious and destructive interests, responded in full force with armoured vehicles, shotguns, assault rifles, snipers, helicopters, tear gas, resulting in 21 confirmed arrests. There are also reports coming back that the police were snatching people’s phones and other recording devices, deleting pictures and video without permission and in direct violation of North Dakota laws. This response, these actions on the part of the police are clear evidence of the egregious and ongoing escalation of the violations of our Indigenous and Human Rights.”

Related How the Cabal Maintains Their Power And What You Need To Do To Stop It – Un-Consent | Beyond BRICS: Exposing the Rats

Although corporate media has largely ignored the massive occupation and movement to halt Energy Transfer Partners’ construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, major outlets were forced to address the issue when, at the beginning of September, mercenaries hired by the company brutally attacked unarmed water protectors — including women and children — with vicious dogs, pepper spray, and tear gas.

As Native Americans and activists peacefully chanted “water is life,” a private security firm — linked to notorious international firm G4S, which once employed the Orlando Pulse nightclub shooter — unleashed dogs indiscriminately into the crowd to maul and maim anyone in their path.

That attack took place after a Standing Rock Sioux historian, who had only recently been permitted onto private property outside the reservation to survey the land for culturally and historically significant sites, discovered construction crews in essence used court documentation as a guide to decimate those sites in area 20 miles removed from ongoing pipeline construction.

Outraged water protectors flocked to the scene in protest, but although they remained peaceful and brought no weapons, the private security firm’s henchmen initiated the brutal attack.

Now, it appears, North Dakota law enforcement has picked up where private security left off — acting in the interests of Big Oil against peoples native to the land.

The ongoing dispute — in pure number of Native and indigenous peoples from around the country and world, and in callous and brutal governmental response — has been deemed the largest standoff between Native Americans and the U.S. government in over 100 years, evidencing continued exploitation of and violence by the same forces who historically committed genocide in battles over the same land.

“We are constantly fed the narrative that the police are armed and active in the protection of the public,” Red Warrior Camp’s statement continued. “Are we not the public? Are the violations of our rights so easily and repeatedly acceptable? Are you paying attention? The United States of America is occupying Indigenous Land and when their occupation and ruination of our lands and waters is challenged they respond with unprecedented violence, with kidnapping our brothers and sisters protecting us and our territories. They are incarcerating our Warriors, our Women, our Youth. Today’s ceremony should never have been interrupted, no arrests should have been made and certainly the military machine should not have been called in in response to our prayers.”

Federal and state courts along Dakota Access Pipeline’s planned 1,172-mile route have halted construction in a number of locations and permitted Native Americans to continue camping, provided they assume responsibility for any resulting issues of liability.

Water protectors from around the world at the various camps have repeatedly pleaded with the Obama administration to issue a permanent stoppage of construction. Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Chairman David Archambault II even appealed to the United Nations to intervene, telling reporters “just because something is legal, does not make it right.

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“The world needs to know what is happening to the Indigenous peoples of the United States,” he told the U.N. Human Rights Commission in Geneva in mid-September.

“This pipeline violates our treaty rights and our human rights, and it violates the U.N.’s own Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. I hope the U.N. will use its influence and international platform to protect the rights of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.”

Indeed the world — if not mainstream media, Big Oil, or the U.S. government — is watching, and sees how the State effectively dismisses the rights of Native Americans in favor of corporate profits. But the water protectors refuse to back down until the Dakota Access Pipeline project is forever tabled and can no longer threaten sacred sites and precious water supplies — no matter how violent the crackdowns on peaceful people become.

“We have no fear,” the Red Warrior Camp concluded its statement, “why should we when we speak and act the truth?”

Ed. note: Formatting prevented posting of video’s and tweets, see more here

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Source:http://sitsshow.blogspot.com/2016/09/Media-Black-out-Militarized-Police-Raid-Dakota-Protest-To-Break-Up-Peaceful-Prayer-Circle-Please-Help-Spread-This-Story.html

http://thefreethoughtproject.com/shock-video-militarized-police-raid-dakota-protest-break-peaceful-prayer-circle/

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