Groundbreaking solar device pulls water from DRY air


by / Tuesday, 02 May 2017 / Published in Absolute Data

Groundbreaking solar device pulls water from DRY air

by JD Heyes, published on Natural News, on April 27, 2017

Man-Thirst-Desert-Water-Bottle-Reach

(Natural News) What if no matter where you lived, and under any circumstances, you would never be without life-sustaining water? That day has arrived, thanks to breakthrough technology.

As reported by Science Daily, researchers envision a future where every home, no matter where it is located, has the ability to simply pull water in from the air, even those homes located in dry, desert-like climates. Even more interesting, the sun powers the device.

The so-called “water harvester,” which is solar-powered, was showcased recently in the journal Science. A demonstration of the device in mid-April showed that with only ambient sunlight it can extract liters of water from the air, even in humidity as low as 20 percent.

Science Daily noted that the device was built by researchers and developers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. It is constructed using a metal-organic framework (MOF), a special kind of material that was made at the University of California-Berkeley.

“This is a major breakthrough in the long-standing challenge of harvesting water from the air and low humidity,” said Omar Yaghi, a faculty scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, holder of the James and Neeltje Tretter chair in chemistry at UC-Berkeley, and a senior co-author of the paper.

“There is no other way to do that right now, except by using extra energy,” Yaghi continued. “Your electric dehumidifier at home ‘produces’ very expensive water.” (RELATED: The Best Ways To Filter Your Water So You Don’t Get Sick)

The paper noted that researchers were able to pull some 3 quarts of water out of the air in 20-30 percent humidity over a period of 12 hours. They used a single kilogram (2.2. pounds) of MOF, and tested the device in real-world conditions – on rooftops at MIT, which is located in Cambridge, Mass., near Boston.

Some say the device will be perfect for those who either wish to live off-grid, those who currently do – and those who, for some reason in the future, have no choice but to live off-grid and need clean water to drink.

“One vision for the future is to have water off-grid, where you have a device at home running on ambient solar for delivering water that satisfies the needs of a household,” Yaghi – who is also the founding director of the Berkeley Global Science Institute, co-founder of the Kavli Energy NanoSciences Institute and the California Research Alliance by BASF – said. “To me, that will be made possible because of this experiment. I call it personalized water.”

Science Daily noted further:

Yaghi invented metal-organic frameworks more than 20 years ago, combining metals like magnesium or aluminum with organic molecules in a tinker-toy arrangement to create rigid, porous structures ideal for storing gases and liquids. Since then, more than 20,000 different MOFs have been created by researchers worldwide.

Other similar structures can retrieve carbon dioxide from flues, separate petrochemicals and other uses.

It’s unknown what widespread effect the device may have on overall climate patterns and weather, but many believe it is a remarkable invention that can finally bring needed water to parts of the world where it is otherwise scarce.

Also, there is that off-the-grid utility that will no doubt be snatched up by more than a few preppers. (RELATED: Know And Understand These Water Survival Myths So You Can Better Protect Your Family)

“This work offers a new way to harvest water from air that does not require high relative humidity conditions and is much more energy efficient than other existing technologies,” said Evelyn Wang, a mechanical engineer at MIT.

There is much more work to be done. The current device is only capable of absorbing about 20 percent of its weight in water, but Yaghi believes further development will raise that to 40 percent using other MOF materials. He also believes the materials can be adjusted to become more effective at water harvesting in lower or higher humidity environments.

“It’s not just that we made a passive device that sits there collecting water,” said Yaghi, “we have now laid both the experimental and theoretical foundations so that we can screen other MOFs, thousands of which can be made, to find better materials.”

Perhaps such devices will be coming to a prepper store at some point in the future.

J.D. Heyes is a senior writer for NaturalNews.com and NewsTarget.com, and editor-in-chief of The National Sentinel.

Sources:

ScienceDaily.com

NaturalNews.com

http://i-uv.com/groundbreaking-solar-device-pulls-water-from-dry-air/

UBUNTU Update 16 Oct 2016 by Michael Tellinger


“ONE SMALL TOWN” Can change the world!
The new global UBUNTU plan of action for 2017
“ONE SMALL TOWN” Can change the world! – is about to be released any day. While in the USA, during Sept 2016 we had a powerful strategic meeting with several of the UBUNTU USA team core members and agreed on our new strategy and plan of action that we all believe will be unstoppable.

The ONE SMALL TOWN plan is a solid model which will unite people and their political leaders while providing unimaginable opportunities for conscious millionaires to come to the rescue of the many stagnant or failing small towns in the USA and all over the world.

We are creating communities of abundance, where people live united in support of each other – instead of living divided in fear of each other – and where everything and anything is possible, because there are no hurdles or restrictions to progress. This plan will be implemented in all countries with minor modifications, through the core management teams in each country.

We are now truly starting to pave the highway of unity across all borders and cultural divides, out of the matrix of economic enslavement, and manifesting our own UTOPIAN reality that so many of us have wished for all our lives. A new society where the need for “money” is no longer relevant.

There are many movements that share great knowledge and information with people of the world, but at this stage it seems that the UBUNTU Movement is the only movement with a plan for the future, and a NEW SYSTEM. The plan is simple and easily achievable. All we have to do is unite and work in cooperation and collaboration. If anyone tells you otherwise, they are trying to mislead you or keep you trapped in the matrix.

Anonymous, is planing large gatherings to voice the people’s unhappiness with global affairs and stating that we urgently need a new PLAN. I urge everyone to notify the Anonymous Group that UBUNTU has a plan – and to help spread the awareness of our plan to the world.

We are creating a new alternative and a new way ahead for all of humanity – without any violence, resistance, or opposition to anyone. As we create this new reality and a new system for ourselves in our united communities, the old system will simply wither and fade away.

In the days to come, I will be reaching out to all countries to establish the core UBUNTU management teams that will receive detailed training regarding the Plan of Action so that they can present it to their own towns accurately.
Join the UBUNTU Movement and spread the message – become a seed of consciousness in your area. http://www.ubuntuparty.org.za
In unity and resonance
Michael Tellinger

What Came Before, featuring Steve-O: The Truth About Meat and Modern Farms


Factory farms dominate U.S. food production, employing abusive practices that maximize agribusiness profits at the expense of the environment, our communities, animal welfare, and even our health.

Far from the idyllic, spacious pastures that are shown in advertisements for meat, milk, and eggs, factory farms typically consist of large numbers of animals being raised in extreme confinement. Animals on factory farms are regarded as commodities to be exploited for profit. They undergo painful mutilations and are bred to grow unnaturally fast and large for the purpose of maximizing meat, egg, and milk production for the food industry. Their bodies cannot support this growth, which results in debilitating and painful conditions and deformities.

The factory farming industry puts incredible strain on our natural resources. The extreme amount of waste created by raising so many animals in one place pollutes our land, air, and water. Residents of rural communities surrounding factory farms report high incidents of illness, and their property values are often lowered by their proximity to industrial farms. To counteract the health challenges presented by overcrowded, stressful, unsanitary living conditions, antibiotics are used extensively on factory farms, which can create drug-resistant bacteria and put human health at risk.

To learn more about the devastating effects of factory farming on animals, human health, and the planet, explore the links to the left.

LOCAL, PHOTOS: We begin to lean in to Summer Solstice


In case you haven’t noticed, the Sun is rising further NE than at any other time of year. Likewise, it sets further NW. All day long, it arcs across the sky nearly overhead, which is why the day is so much longer than the night. Unlike in winter, when at that Solstice Sun rises SE and sets SW, and never gets that far above the horizon during its short days.

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So here we are, nearly at Summer Solstice, the time of fullness, when the dreams of winter manifest in reality, thanks to the Sun, which heats the earth and makes seemingly lifeless plants turn green, grow, and flower. Hildegaard, a 12th century mystic nun, called this phenomenon “veriditas,” the greening, that mysterious force of Nature to which we owe our very lives.

For this location, the Solstice itself, when the Sun reaches 0°00 Cancer, occurs at 6:45 PM EDT, Monday evening, June 20, and about ten hours after this month’s Full Moon at 5°42 Capricorn.

This Summer Solstice imprints on us the ongoing Saturn/Neptune/Jupiter T-cross which has us all so bedazzled and befuddled by the many varieties, one might say, of “Truth,” — notice the many names we have for it now, “truthiness,” “verisimilitude,” “credibility,” and so on: Saturn in Sagittarius and Jupiter in Virgo, large vs. small, philosophical vs. analytic, either or both of which can crush our most sensitive feelings (Neptune in Pisces).

Screen Shot 2016-06-17 at 1.23.09 PM

And this Solstice brings us the powerful, ongoing Mars in Scorpio drama, which forces old buried, emotional stuff to the surface, for review, and hopefully, release.

Here in the Green Acres Permaculture Village, we are readying ourselves for an event, to be held Sunday evening, the night before Solstice. This event will have three parts.

First, at 5 P.M., an orientation for anyone who is interested in joining hOUR Bloomington Timebank,  a wonderful, and powerful way to both extend one’s valuable time and skills to others in exchange for time and skills that you need, not necessarily from the same person. Timebanks value each person’s contribution as equal to all others; whether someone helps another cleaning their house, or giving their services as an attorney, both are equally valued. Timebanks are one way that we can create an eco-nomy, below the money matrix. An added benefit of the Timebank is that it helps us meet new people. Obviously, the more people who sign up for the timebank, the more valuable it becomes for its members. This event will herald hOUR timebank’s first anniversary!

We are holding the event here in the Green Acres Village, partly because I need the hours! I currently owe about 30 hours — thanks to computer help from a member who does IT — and so must make up those hours! Everything I do to prepare for this event, including writing this post, cleaning up the patio, deciding how to publicize it, talking with others about it, cleaning up afterwards, etc. etc., helps me discharge my debt to the timebank.

Not that I wouldn’t be doing a Solstice event anyhow. Over the years we in Green Acres have held a number of Solstice events, both Summer and Winter. About ten years ago, we did an event so elaborate that it required a workshop beforehand to make the decorations for it, and included a parade through the neighborhood and a wishing tree. Two years ago, we held a Solstice Ceremony and breakfast at the moment of the Solstice itself, which happened to be around 6:30 AM! We thought no one would come except we who live here. To our surprise, a dozen people showed up. At that ceremony, my friend Ted led us in a blessing for the garden. Which led me to invite him to come down from Oakwood Retreat Center where he lives, once again, to lead us in a blessing.

But that’s later in the evening. First, as I said, the Timebank oreintation.

Next, at around 6 p.m. potluck. And I hear rumors that there will be music for this one, that someone is bringing instruments. Great!

And finally, at around 7:30 p.m. our Solstice Ceremony, which will include an initial circle, where I will talk about the symbology of Summer Solstice and podmate Brie will talk about what we are doing here to manifest our vision; Rebecca will then lead a tour through the grounds of this three-house complex; finally, we will circle up again for Ted to lead us in a Blessing Ceremony, this time not just for the Green Acres Garden, but for the Green Acres Village germinating here in Green Acres, this sweet little community springing up in the middle of an existing neighborhood.

Here’s the patio where our event will be held. This patio saw many many events last year, including the Witchy Woman’s Equinox Celebration and Ceremony!

patio

Last night neighbor Jen and I sorted rock and bricks, lining one of the patio garden beds with the bricks,

brick rim

and handing the rocks to Rebecca, who is busy making a path to the new chicken house next door.

(By the way, one of the things that helps what we are doing as “wild” permaculturists be more acceptable townspeople is to make edges like that above. To show that our work is intentional, no accident. Somehow, borders help sooth the fears of those whose imaginations limit them to loud mowing of featureless, monocultured, herbicided lawns.)

rock trail

The new chicks are still separated from the older hens,

new chicks— oops! I’m at the gate and look down; there are two of the five hens. No, no, you can’t come out right now!

by gate

Since Rebecca is the designer of the grounds, our place is not just practical, but artistic.

Here’s a standing stone . . .

standing stone

And a bird’s nest flower . . .

bird nest flower

I asked Rebecca what she wanted me to do today (I try to give an hour or two to the project on a daily basis). Plant these little flowers, she told me.

flowers

“Where?”

“Anywhere!”

“What color will their flowers be?”

“I don’t know! We thought they were berry plants, and they’re not!”

I’ll end with Brie’s third weekly “communique” to the CSA members of our new Green Acres Urban Farm.

Oh yeah, and check out especially this news!

 

Source:https://wordpress.com/read/feeds/47226534/posts/1062111340

Tribes Create Their Own Food Laws to Stop USDA From Killing Native Food Economies


From blue corn to bison, narrow federal food-safety codes impact tribal food systems. But advocates are writing their own food laws to preserve Native food sovereignty.
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SALT RIVER PIMA-MARICOPA INDIAN COMMUNITY, Ariz. – Jacob Butler eyed a lemon tree—its bright yellow fruit nestled among thick green leaves and set against the blue Arizona sky—then checked on the tiny pomegranates and grapes in the garden as a black-striped lizard darted into the shade of a mesquite tree. In the distance, downtown Phoenix glittered under the rising sun.

”Our garden is a platform to perpetuate our culture.“

“We try to grow what’s been here for hundreds, if not thousands, of years,” says Butler, the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community garden coordinator, as he surveyed the land and the plants growing on it. “For the past 13 years we’ve been doing this, so it’s in the minds of the people now.”

Traditionally, Pima and Maricopa tribal members grew lima beans, squash, corn, and other vegetables; used mesquite trees for food, medicine, and other practical purposes; and relied on wild game for food. Today, about 12,000 acres of their reservation are used for industrial farming—cotton, alfalfa, potatoes, and other commercial crops—but, in the garden where Butler works, agriculture isn’t a financial boon: It’s a way to strengthen and cultivate culture.

“What are the stories that go along with this tree? What’s the story we tell that says when squash came to the people or corn came to the people? What are the songs that go with those things?” says Butler. “That’s what we incorporate here: Our garden is a platform to perpetuate our culture.”

According to Butler, tribal members once cultivated myriad varieties of beans, squash, and melons. Now, many of those crops have become extinct and their stories lost, and losing other heirloom foods would have irreversible effects on cultural practices.

Indigenous communities have been sustained by thousands of years of food knowledge. But recent federal food safety rules could cripple those traditional systems and prevent the growth of agricultural economies in Indian Country, according to advocates and attorneys. Of the 567 tribal nations in the United States, only a handful have adopted laws that address food production and processing. Without functioning laws around food, tribes engaged in anything from farming to food handling and animal health are ceding power to state and federal authorities.

To protect tribal food systems, those advocates and attorneys are taking the law into their own hands, literally, by writing comprehensive food codes that can be adopted by tribes and used to effectively circumvent federal food safety codes. Because tribes retain sovereignty—complicated and sometimes limited though it may be—they can assert an equal right with the federal government to establish regulations for food handling.

Recent federal food safety rules could cripple those traditional systems.

“Tribal sovereignty is food sovereignty, and how do you assert food sovereignty?” says A-dae Romero-Briones, a consultant with the First Nations Development Institute, an economic development organization. “You do that through a tribal code.”

Food codes and laws are basic legislation governing agriculture and food processing. Food codes are good things: They are designed to protect consumers from products that could make them sick or even kill them, as with a national salmonella outbreak linked to peanut butter in 2008, and, more recently, E. Coli outbreaks at Chipotle restaurants in 11 states.

Since 2011, food laws have become tougher, thanks to the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), the first major rewrite of U.S. food-safety laws in more than 50 years. Under FSMA, producers must take into account everything from the packaging and refrigeration of products to how crops are grown, all in the name of safety. These safety controls raise interesting questions in Indian Country.

Traditionally, Pima and Maricopa tribal members grew lima beans, squash, corn, and other vegetables. Today, about 12,000 acres of their reservation are used for industrial farming. YES! photo by Tristan Ahtone.

In many Native communities, for example, access to certified kitchens and state-of-the-art facilities is slim to nonexistent. That means producers often must rely on traditional knowledge to make foods that are safe for consumption. One example, says Romero-Briones, is blue corn products.

“That’s an industry that has existed for generations,” she says. “But if you want to produce it or process it in traditional fashions, you’re probably not going to be able to do that because you’re going to have to do it in a certified kitchen.”

Under FSMA, tribal food economies face two options: Assimilate by complying with federal law or keep tribal food products confined to the reservation.

“It’s one thing to say that we have to develop food and process food in certain ways, but it’s another thing to recognize that tribes have their own versions of food safety,” says Romero-Briones. “Tribes have been developing food economies for thousands of years.”

Another example of how traditional foods are impacted is buffalo slaughter. Dozens of tribes from the Dakotas to Oklahoma are engaged in buffalo management and harvesting. But those hoping to get buffalo products into markets outside of tribal communities often face big hurdles.

”Tribes have been developing food economies for thousands of years.“

Buffalo, for example, is considered an exotic animal under federal guidelines, says Dan Cornelius, with the Intertribal Agriculture Council. And that has repercussions when it comes to what the federal government will support.

“For domestic animals, USDA will pay for the cost of that inspector. For exotics, they don’t,” Cornelius says.

Inspections can run as high as $70 an animal, and all buffalo products must be processed in an FDA-approved facility. By implementing food codes, tribes could find alternative ways to getting buffalo meat inspected and processed. Cornelius says building an infrastructure that lowers costs would allow buffalo meat to get to market faster.

“Ultimately, is it a safe process? If it is, then how can you develop a tribally specific provision that still is ensuring a safe and healthy food but is addressing that barrier where there is a conflict?” he says.

So how do 567 different tribes with 567 different traditions, needs, and goals go about writing food codes specific to their cultural heritages? They call a lawyer. Specifically, Janie Hipp, director of the Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative, a legal think tank at the University of Arkansas.

Hipp, a former senior advisor for tribal relations at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, says her office has already received dozens of calls from tribal governments about food inspection and how to get tribal products off reservation and into other markets.

One area of concern has been general food safety. With the passage of FSMA, laws governing how food is grown, processed, and handled are changing rapidly.

According to Hipp, tribal governments need to respond, not only to protect their own producers, but also to protect their own existing food production systems.

Jacob Butler in the seed bank. YES! photo by Tristan Ahtone.

Intellectual property is another priority. Many tribes have specific, traditional uses for seeds, crops, and livestock, and, without laws to protect a tribe’s unique use of a particular plant or animal, a corporation could trademark and commercialize that product—anything from Wojapi, a Lakota dessert made from berries, to Piki, a traditional Hopi bread made from cornmeal.

“Having nothing on the books is not an option anymore,” says Hipp. “Regardless of whether it’s a commercialized product or a traditional and very sheltered and protected product, the law needs to be robust in that area.”

The development of tribal food codes isn’t a copy-and-paste job, though. It’s more of a choose-your-own-adventure situation where newly written laws can be adopted, then tweaked to an individual tribe’s needs. As portions of the code are written, they’re made public so tribal governments can start adapting them. So far, Hipp says the Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative has had more than a dozen meetings with tribes.

”Are we putting our seeds at risk?”

“I don’t think it does anybody any good for us to just sit and bake it up for three years,” said Hipp. “We would prefer to roll things out, get in touch, modify, have it be a more organic process than to just have everybody sitting outside the room waiting for the release.”

Back at the Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community garden, Jacob Butler pulled a brown paper bag off a shelf. He dipped his hand into the bag and produced a fistful of white pea seeds.

Most of the seeds in the seed bank are heirlooms with genealogies stretching back hundreds of years. YES! photo by Tristan Ahtone.

“My generation and generations before me, we all went to school outside of the community,” says Butler. “None of us really got taught our culture directly at home because our parents were taught that it was a detriment to our success.”

The seed bank is currently housed in a janitor’s closet with brown paper bags, plastic bottles, and glass containers full of pinto-striped runner beans, amaranth, basil, luffa, corn, and dozens of other seeds. But Butler says he has concerns for their future.

“For me, it’s cross-contamination with [genetically modified] seeds,” he says. “If this was to become a bigger enterprise, where we were growing traditional foods for sale, then are we putting our seeds at risk?”

Most of the seeds are heirlooms with genealogies stretching back hundreds of years, and Butler says one of his next projects is to meticulously catalogue every item in the bank for future Pima and Maricopa farmers.

“There are kids that have grown up being a part of this program that know right off the bat, ‘Oh hey, that’s a Keli Baasho or a muskmelon,’” Butler says as he looked around the shelves. “That word Keli Baasho means ‘old man’s chest,’ so they’re associating that melon with language.”

With food and culture so intimately intertwined and vital to the survival of Salt River, the tribe has some big ideas to consider when it comes to the future of agriculture: Will it be commercial or traditional? What constitutes organic? How will the few remaining heirloom crops be protected from GMO contamination? Will Pima and Maricopa crops be sold, and, if so, how will they be kept safe for consumers? Salt River has yet to decide on those issues, and Butler says adopting a comprehensive food code would start the process of strengthening the tribe’s future: Native people growing native foods, protected and guided by native laws.

“It’s a conversation we should be having,” says Butler. “People are wanting to see change.”

http://www.yesmagazine.org/people-power/tribes-create-their-own-food-laws-to-stop-usda-from-killing-native-food-economies-20160524

President Putin facilitates the “Space of Love” concept in Russia


Note: Before the illegal military occupation of the Hawaiian Kingdom in the 1890’s, there was no concept as “land ownership”. The monarchy gave residents a parcel of land to steward in perpetuity and was theirs pass on to family members – as long as the land was cared for as mutually agreed upon, based on land covenants.  This is an interesting move to observe on Putin’s behalf….Blessings, {~A~}
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
In January 2015 Russia enacted the principle thing that Anastasia suggests for all nations to do:

– For the governments of the world to GIFT to all families of that nation what she termed “a Space of Love” or a “Kin’s Domain”. This is an area of land that a couple, a group of retirees, or a “family” (a very wide definition here) would establish for themselves and their children and grandchildren, into perpetuity. This would involve putting up your permanent buildings and out-houses such as sheds, woodwork shop, chicken coops, fish farming processing plant, home dairy (cheese, yoghut, etc production), milking shed, piggery, etc… (whatever YOU and your family want!) and planting your permanent fruiting trees and berries, and your timber trees for future generations, and obviously, establishing your vegetable garden. In English-language terms, a “Kin’s Domain” would be the family’s or the group’s “homestead”.

Anastasia specified that the area of land GIVEN to each couple or family should be One Hectare (just as Russian Deputy PM Yuri Tretnev proposed pre-2015) – so people can plant their own crops, raise small animals, have space for their children to run around and learn about nature, keep bees, enjoy each other’s company and welcome people outside of the family.

Anastatia envisaged (in “The Ringing Cedars of Russia” books published in Russian in 1996), that these “Kins Domains” or “Spaces of Love” would eventually return the whole world back to the “Garden Paradise” that it was originally: PEOPLE living on the land would work on creating a beautiful and useful garden on their “Kins Domain” and thereby, all efforts would return the whole world back to its original pristine condition…  A “garden of paradise”.  For example:

This is Tim Wilmott’s garden in England !!

He created this tropical garden paradise over a 20-year period. 

See what humans can do?  … Amazing !!!  : )

Source:  The Telegraph, July 2014

Please note:  The amount of ARABLE land on planet earth is 7,500,000,000 acres… (7.5 billion). You can easily Google these figures. That’s the same number of acres as there are people on the planet – so right now, every man, woman and child could have guardianship of one acre…  RIGHT NOW !!  

And just to clarify: “Arable” land means fertile, good to grow trees, food and vegetables on…  ie: it’s not rock or sand, but it’s good soil.

Also, there are billions of acres of non-arable land on the earth as well, which is where towns and cities could be built (or remain), where manufacturing could happen, IT, commerce, government buildings, and all kinds of other infrastructure such as ship building, airports, logistics…

ie:  There would be no problems whatsoever in getting everbody on this planet 

on to FARMABLE LAND.  There is PLENTY for all !!  : )

Articles/Research paper:

In 2011 the dacha gardens of Russia produced 40% of the nation’s food. – Natural Homes.com

The History of Dacha Movement – Ringing Cedars of Russia.org

“Global over-population” is a crock !!  – Co-creating Our New Earth

THE SOCIOECONOMIC AND CULTURAL SIGNIFICANCE OF FOOD GARDENING IN THE VLADIMIR REGION OF RUSSIA – dissertation by Leonid Sharashkin (May) 2008.

Note: Leonid Sharashkin is the translator of “The Ringing Cedars of Russia” books into English.

Anastasia’s ‘dream’ is coming true…

Homestead Act for Russian Far East – Putin supports free land handout

https://www.rt.com/politics/224099-russia-land-free-east/

The Russian president has approved the idea to offer large land plots for free to anyone who resettles to the Russian Far East to start a farm or other business.

The initiative was first voiced by the deputy PM and presidential envoy to the Far East Federal District, Yuri Trutnev, who said that such a step would “strengthen the tendency of people’s migration to the Far East,” Interfax reported.Trutnev told reporters that Putin called the idea right in principle and noted that similar programs had been successfully implemented in Siberia historically. Putin urged all responsible officials to be precise and cautious when detailing the conditions for land ownership, however.

Trutnev’s initial suggestion was to “create a mechanism for the free allocation of a 1 hectare (2.5 acres) plot of land to every resident of the Far East and to anyone who is willing to come and live in the region so that they could start a private business in farming, forestry, game hunting or some other enterprise.”

He added that the agreement could be signed for five years, and then it should either enter full force if the new landlord follows the plan, or be declared void if the land is not used. He also added that corruption in the process of distribution can be prevented if the land plots are far from big cities with their well-developed infrastructure and competitive environment.

The scheme has been designed to limit the possible selling of the land plots to foreign companies and individuals, Trutnev said. “We will give it a try,” he said. “I think this measure will prove to be effective.”

Please also see:

Russia gives away one hectare of farmland and forest to its citizens  – Siberian Times

China Eyes Land Giveaway Program in Russia’s Far East  – The Diplomat

Homestead Act for Russian Far East – Putin Supports Free Land Handout  – Good News Network

Far_Eastern_in_Russia-map-cc-TUBS

http://co-creatingournewearth.blogspot.com/2016/02/president-putin-facilitates-space-of.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Co-creatingOurNewEarth+%28Co-creating+Our+New+Earth%29

When Fake ‘Super Meat’ Is Better Than the Real Thing


Nov. 18 (Bloomberg) – Beyond Meat, maker of plant-based “chicken” and “ground beef,” will aim for the heart of the carnivorous market with a soy-protein-based hamburger patty called the Beast Burger. Beyond Meat Founder Ethan Brown says their meatless products taste and feel like the real thing and they believe they can revolutionize the way we eat. Bloomberg’s Sam Grobart reports for “The Year Ahead: 2015” series. (Source: Bloomberg)

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Marcin Jakubowski: Open Source Ecology Lecture



Lecture, April 2, 2014 at the Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry, CMU College of Fine Arts. Presented in partnership with the CMU School of Architecture Spring 2014 Lecture Series.
TED Senior Fellow Marcin Jakubowski, a Princeton-trained physicist-turned-farmer, is using the power of the DIY movement to create a free, open-source “starter kit for civilization.” Jakubowski directs the Open Source Ecology initiative, which aims to develop a set of easy-to-follow, open source blueprints for the 50 machines most essential for modern life. The 50 machines comprise the Global Village Construction Set: a “lifesize, scalable, modular LEGO construction set” for building modern life, and include an automobile, an induction furnace, and a bakery oven.
Jakubowski is testing the feasibility of this concept on “Factor e Farm,” a 30-acre parcel of land near Kansas City, Missouri. According to its website, Factor e Farm “aims to take what civilization has learned about what it means to thrive, and determine whether it is feasible to use abundant local resources to create industrial civilization. [….] This is a Big Hairy Audacious Goal, but its achievement has huge implications on solving Wicked Problems.”
Marcin Jakubowski’s ideas and work have earned him international acclaim, including distinction as a TED Senior Fellow, a Shuttleworth Foundation Fellow, and a White House Champion of Change. He has been profiled by news outlets and academic journals worldwide. During Jakubowski’s visit, he will first participate in a panel discussion with School of Architecture faculty members Dana Cupkova, Madeline Gannon, and Matt Huber about the social responsibility of digital design; then he’ll offer a lecture and participate in a Q&A session about his work with Open Source Ecology and Factor e Farm. Jakubowski also seeks to meet one-on-one with talented designers, creators, and thinkers interested in helping kickstart Factor e Farm as the first full-scale implementation of Open Source Ecology.
For more information on Jackubowski, see this New Yorker article, “The Civilization Kit” (9MB PDF).

Hemp Plant Found To “Eat” Radiation and Drive Away Toxicity – Hemp Fields Should Be Planted Around Fukushima


fukuActivists have been shouting they want an end to GMO foods for more than a decade now, and Cannabis Sattiva L. supporters have been at it for even longer, so why has the US government finally given farmers the right to legally grow industrial hemp, the non-hallucinatory, sister plant of medical marijuana?

It is safe to say that industrialized hemp should have been legalized years ago. With THC levels so low, you would have to smoke more of it than Snoop Dogg to get ‘high’ – and that’s a lot of Cannabis, it is ridiculous that it was classified as a drug at all. It has numerous uses and could replace many crops that require heavy irrigation and pesticides, like cotton, for example. Here’s the most interesting fact though – hemp plants ‘eat’ radiation.

When the Chernobyl Nuclear Plant Reactor 4 accident caused severe radioactive contamination in 1986, families within a 30-kilometer area of the site had to be evacuated. Radioactive contamination was later found at 100 kilometers from the accident site, and Fukushima radiation levels are still to be determined, with the Japanese government planning on dumping their overflowing radiated water tanks into the Pacific as we speak.

As with the Chernobyl incident, scientists are finding radioactive emissions and toxic metals–including iodine, cesium-137, strontium-90, and plutonium–concentrated in the soil, plants, and animals of Japan, but also now throughout the United States and all along the West Coast – from Canada to Mexico. Even the EPA has admitted that any living tissue can be affected by radiation exposure. High levels of thyroid disease and cancer have been reported in Japan, and our ocean is dying by the day. Scientists are also expecting that children born on the US West Coast will suffer a 28% higher incident of hyperthyroidism – a disease that accompanies radiation exposure. Even the livestock that grazed on irradiated grasses grown in contaminated soils developed meat with high concentrations of these unwanted toxins after Chernobyl, and Fukushima is exponentially worse.

Dr. Ilya Raskin of Rutgers University’s Biotechnology Center for Agriculture and the Environment, who was a member of the original task force sent by the IAEA to examine food safety at the Chernobyl site figured out that through phytoremediation utilizing hemp, among other plants, the soil, and thus the food supply could be saved from toxicity.

Phytoremediation is the process whereby green plants remove toxins from the soil. Plants can extract specific elements within their ecosystem and still thrive. They accumulate the toxins in their tissues and root systems but remain undamaged. Sunflowers have been known to do something similar for centuries, eliminating heavy metals and pesticides from damaged soil. Two members of the mustard family are also useful for this process – Brassica juncea and Brassica carinata, but it seems hemp is quite amazing at sucking up radiation.

Granted, the government is probably dumbfounded at what to do with the Fukushima radiation headed our way, but the legalization of hemp just might balance some of the toxicity scientists expect.  Fortunately, California, one of the states that will be hardest hit, has already legalized industrial hemp, but it has to wait for the federal government to give states the right before they can actually grow it. The Farm Bill only allows ‘research’ growth at certain institutions in 10 states currently.

George Washington and Thomas Jefferson grew hemp. In light of Fukushima, let’s join our countries’ founders to grow it too. You can help clean the soil in your area if hemp or medical marijuana has been legalized in your state, and help it to pass in further states by being vocal with your state and federal representatives.

Source:

http://www.nationofchange.org/did-government-give-industrial-hemp-pass-clean-radiation-states-1392388637

The Elites Plan For A California Drought, 4th Gen Farmer Speaks Out ~ WeAreChange


This video was originally produced by Kayla Moon a Change Media University Student who is working as an independent journalist. It was predicted by NASA that California only has a year left of surface water. We are half way through the year in 2015 and our representatives are just now holding town hall meetings with very little discussed with real time solutions. Abundant Harvest founder, 4th generation farmer and activist speaks on the conscious demise of the American Empire, if we can not come together as a nation to solve these vital issues.

Check out more of Kayla’s videos here https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuRd…

Kayla Moon is the director of American Culture Shock
A Future of Minds production.

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France Declares All New Rooftops Must Be Topped With Plants Or Solar Panels


Apr 8, 2015

 

France-Declares-All-New-Rooftops-Must-Be-Topped-With-Plants-Or-Solar-Panels

A new law recently passed in France mandates that all new buildings that are built in commercial zones in France must be partially covered in either plants or solar panels.

Green roofs, as they are called, have an isolating effect which helps to reduce the amount of energy needed to heat a building during the winter or cool it in the summer. They are capable of retaining rainwater and reducing problems with runoff, and also offer birds a place to call home in the urban jungle.

French environmental activists originally wanted to pass a law that would make the green roofs cover the entire surface of all new roofs.

However, partially covered roofs make for a great start, and are still a huge step in the right direction.

Some say the law that was passed is actually better, as it gives the business owners a chance to install solar panels to help provide the buildings with renewable energy, thereby leaving even less of a footprint.

Green roofs are already very popular in Germany and Australia, as well as Canada’s city of Toronto! This  by-law was adopted in 2009, by the city of Toronto which mandated green roofs on all new industrial and residential buildings.

Benefits of Green Roofs

There are so many benefits to green roofs. Here are just a few:

  • Adding natural beauty and major aesthetic improvement to buildings, which in turn increases the investment opportunity.
  • Helping contribute to landfill diversion by prolonging the life of waterproofing membranes, using recycled materials, and prolonging the service of heating, ventilation, and HVAC systems through decreased use.
  • Green roofs assist with storm water management because water is stored by the substrate, then taken up by plants, and thus returned to the atmosphere through transpiration and evaporation. They also retain rainwater and moderate the temperature of the water and act as natural filters for the water that does run off. They delay the time at which runoff occurs, which results in decreased stress on sewer systems during peak periods.
  • The plants on green roofs do a great job of capturing airborne pollutants and other atmospheric deposition. They can also filter noxious gasses.
  • They open up new areas for community gardens, commercial and recreational space in busy cities where this space is generally quite limited.

France is definitely on the right track, but it should be a mandate that all new buildings being built in North America, and even worldwide, adopt this amazing idea to reap all of the potential benefits.

http://csglobe.com/france-declares-all-new-rooftops-must-be-topped-with-plants-or-solar-panels/

This solar powered floating farm can produce 20 tons of vegetables every day



May 19, 2015

From design practice, Forward Thinking Architecture, come a set of modular floating farms that harvest sunlight and rainwater, as well as desalinate saltwater and grow thousands of tons of vegetables ever year.

Inspired by Chinese floating fish farms, these rectangular units measure 200×350 meters and can connect with other modules via walkways.  The usage of waterways is a great compliment to the farming industry because it makes farming available in so many more locations.  It reduces the need to import food by localizing growth and incorporates rivers and lakes as viable “farmland.”

Each unit is comprised of three levels.  The bottom floor focuses on aquaculture and water desalination, the first floor on hydroponic crop cultivation, and the roof is adorned with solar panels, skylights and rainwater collectors.

 

Each module is anticipated to make 8,152 tons of vegetables every year and bring in 1,703 tons of fish.  The modules, then, connect into a grid and can scale up into huge farms, producing local food for entire cities.

http://www.inhabitat.com/could-solar-powered-modular-floating-farms-be-an-answer-to-global-food-self-sufficiency/

http://www.forwardthinkingarchitecture.com/SFF-FLOATING-FARMS-INITIATIVE

https://www.minds.com/blog/view/447430685691482112/this-solar-powered-floating-farm-can-produce-20-tons-of-vegetables-every-day

Just One Hour From Vancouver There Is A Secret Island Where Everyone Lives Completely Off-grid


Lasqueti is a secret Canadian island where the vast majority of residents are completely off-grid.

offthegrid

Lasqueti is a small island between Vancouver and Vancouver Island, twelve miles long and three miles wide. It is home to a little known community of off-gridders who take pride in their isolation from both mainstream culture and mainland Canada.

With very little industry or economy, most of the residents live simply, taking what they need from the land and having next to no carbon footprint (and little need for money). The 2011 census recorded 426 people living in Lasqueti (although a more up-to-date website states there are 350 permanent residents) including 70 children. According to the community blog, Lasqueti is “an island of individuals, with poets, artists, physicists, fishermen, loggers, tree planters, designers, professional musicians, published authors, some small scale manufacturers, some commercial agriculture as well as professional consultants in education, engineering, forestry and alternate energy.”

While some residents use solar panels, wood burning stoves, wind turbines and water mills, others choose to live without electricity, period. For the average person, that might not sound like fun. But few can argue that the depletion of fossil fuels (and other aspects of modern living) are clearly unsustainable. Lasqueti’s residents share the opinion that living in harmony with nature is not only ethical, it is how we were supposed to live.

Personally, I have been fascinated with Lasqueti since 2010, when I was lucky enough to host one of its residents while he was traveling and ‘couchsurfing’ in Spain. Robert was living on Lasqueti in an old converted school bus (which he ran off vegetable oil), and he was one of the most interesting and intelligent people I’ve ever had the pleasure to meet. Skilled in building yurts, canoes, wooden boats, and other ecological structures, he was also a nomadic free spirit who spoke six languages and was knowledgeable about pretty much anything and everything you could possibly think of. According to Lasqueti’s website, Robert was by no means an exception: the island’s population “is the most highly educated community in British Columbia”, according to Statistics Canada.

In addition to the island’s one bar and one cafe, Lasqueti also has a free store where people can leave or collect items without any monetary exchange. Just one hour by boat from Vancouver island, Lasqueti doesn’t have a tourist industry, booming economy or any industry to speak of, but those who live there say that they enjoy the sense of timelessness, community, and freedom that their home provides.

There is no grocery store, so people tend to keep chickens and grow their own organic produce, as well as foraging for wild food in the forest covering the rocky island. Most people use composting toilets, and one resident even wrote a book entitled ‘How to Shyte on Lasqueti’ for those not familiar with the concept of how this works in practice.

Another useful resource for readers who are interested in seeing Lasqueti for themselves can be found here. The page details various options for visiting the island, including B&Bs and opportunities for wwoofing (helping on farms in exchange for food and accommodation).

We will leave you with some essential advice from Lasqueti’s residents: “However you decide to come, and whatever you are hoping to find here, please keep this in mind:  Lasqueti is not some utopian paradise, it is not an “intentional community”, and it is probably not whatever you think it is – it is just a relatively remote island, populated by a small, tight-knit community of quirky, independent-minded people, with its own unique culture and identity.  Come with an open mind, a willingness to discover something a little different, and without rigid expectations.  Resist the urge to project upon us your vision of what this place “should” be.  It is what it is, and we like it this way, warts and all.  If you can get with that, you too may find a place here.”

In the short documentary film below, a journalist from 16×9 News goes to meet some of Lasqueti’s characters and find out more about life in this beautiful land that time forgot.

This tree produces 40 different types of fruit


Image: Sam Van Aken

An art professor from Syracuse University in the US, Van Aken grew up on a family farm before pursuing a career as an artist, and has combined his knowledge of the two to develop his incredible Tree of 40 Fruit.

In 2008, Van Aken learned that an orchard at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station was about to be shut down due to a lack of funding. This single orchard grew a great number of heirloom, antique, and native varieties of stone fruit, and some of these were 150 to 200 years old. To lose this orchard would render many of these rare and old varieties of fruit extinct, so to preserve them, Van Aken bought the orchard, and spent the following years figuring out how to graft parts of the trees onto a single fruit tree.

Working with a pool of over 250 varieties of stone fruit, Van Aken developed a timeline of when each of them blossom in relationship to each other and started grafting a few onto a working tree’s root structure. Once the working tree was about two years old, Van Aken used a technique called chip grafting to add more varieties on as separate branches. This technique involves taking a sliver off a fruit tree that includes the bud, and inserting that into an incision in the working tree. It’s then taped into place, and left to sit and heal over winter. If all goes well, the branch will be pruned back to encourage it to grow as a normal branch on the working tree.

After about five years and several grafted branches, Van Aken’s first Tree of 40 Fruit was complete.

Aken’s Tree of 40 Fruit looks like a normal tree for most of the year, but in spring it reveals a stunning patchwork of pink, white, red and purple blossoms, which turn into an array of plums, peaches, apricots, nectarines, cherries and almonds during the summer months, all of which are rare and unique varieties.

Not only is it a beautiful specimen, but it’s also helping to preserve the diversity of the world’s stone fruit. Stone fruits are selected for commercial growing based first and foremost on how long they keep, then how large they grow, then how they look, and lastly how they taste. This means that there are thousands of stone fruit varieties in the world, but only a very select few are considered commercially viable, even if they aren’t the best tasting, or most nutritious ones.

Van Aken has grown 16 Trees of 40 Fruit so far, and they’ve been planted in museums, community centres, and private art collections around the US. He now plans to grow a small orchard of these trees in a city setting.

Of course, the obvious question that remains is what happens to all the fruit that gets harvested from these trees? Van Aken told Lauren Salkeld at Epicurious:

“I’ve been told by people that have [a tree] at their home that it provides the perfect amount and perfect variety of fruit. So rather than having one variety that produces more than you know what to do with, it provides good amounts of each of the 40 varieties. Since all of these fruit ripen at different times, from July through October, you also aren’t inundated.”

Read rest of the interview and see video

http://www.sciencealert.com/news/20142107-25892.html

21 Technologies That Are Decentralizing The Economy And Bringing Real Power Back To The People



The Waka Water Tower

The world is becoming more centralized, increasingly focused on economies of scale and transferring wealth to a tiny elite at the top of the financial system.

Yet, at the same time there is another movement that is actively working to decentralize the world.

The 21 decentralizing technologies and innovations in this list are all related to food, energy, water, shelter and waste and they are not designed to disconnect you from mankind, but rather, they integrate deeply with families, communities, societies, and all humans; in a bottom-up process rather than a centralized top-down structure.

Many of these technologies are open-source, some are high-tech and others are low-tech and low-cost solutions.

This list is far from exhaustive, in fact, the reader will discover that each of the technologies on this list is just the tip of a larger network of innovations. Thanks to the information available on the internet, the prospects of self-reliance has never been more real, and more achievable.

1. Space-Intensive Agriculture

Square Foot Gardening

Planting crops in rows has a long tradition, but the paradigm is being challenged. It has been discovered that by planting in two-dimensional patterns allows for more plant growth in small spaces without crowding the plants. It is a simple concept but has powerful implications. By increasing the effectiveness of growing space: cost, time, water, and labor is decreased while increasing production. All of this is accomplished without chemicals. The best known founder is Mel Bartholomew and his book Square Foot Gardening.

2. Window Farms

Window Farms

A third of the world’s population lives in dense urban environments with no access to soil, yet, inspirational individuals have created window farms. This open source and do-it-yourself movement can add food to your plate and living spaces. The ways to adapt this technology are limitless and there is strong community support behind the project.

3. Vertical High-Rise Farm

High-rise Farm

Getting foods to urban areas is a problem that many are trying to tackle, yet it is a serious issue. Most cities only have food reserves of less than four days. Plantagon is a concept to bring high-intensity farms into the city without a giant eyesore.

4. Polyface Farm

Polyface Farm

This is not a single technology but rather the gathering of many pasture based management practices and new technologies. Polyface Farm, run by Joel Salatin and crew, utilizes high-tech electric fences to mimic the natural grazing habits of animals that are impossible to replicate with full-time animal herders. The fences promote native grass growth and limit weeds. Plus, the cost is affordable compared to traditional barb-wire fences. These animals often get all their nutrition from the pasture, eliminating the need to sell to feedlots.

5. Cold Frames & Hoop Houses

Cold Frames

Cold frames and hoop houses solve the problem of how to grow food in the winter without the expense of a greenhouse. Greenhouse plastic mixed with bootstrapping can yield a solar heated environment that keeps frost-hardy plants healthy even in extreme climates.

6. Warka Water Collector

Warka Water Collector

Water is the essence of life, and that is very true in arid climates. The Warka Water project, aims to utilize a simple net within simple structures to collect water. Not only is the technology easy to use, it can utilize local building supplies and construction skills to collect safe drinking water.

7. Band-Saw Mill

Band-Saw Mill

Band-saw technology has existed for several decades but has become increasingly popular over the past five years. It allows for trees to be turned into quality lumber without a large investment. A single person can operate the mill and the equipment is easy to maintain. Small mills allow for environmental improvement to forests and a source of affordable lumber to those willing to roll up their sleeves and get to work.

8. Tiny Houses

Tiny Houses

Many people are not interested in a large house, a lifelong mortgage and all the hassle associated with it, yet still want modern conveniences. The tiny house movement is a reaction to complicated structures and enormous “McMansions”, and tiny houses generally utilize the newest insulation, windows and small-scale heating to create open, yet efficient houses that are often built on trailers for easy movement.

9. The WikiHouseWikiHouse

WikiHouse is an open source construction set, and the aim is to allow anyone to design, develop, and ‘print’ CNC-milled houses and components, which can be assembled with minimal formal skill or training.

10. Global Village Construction Set

Global Village Construction Set

The Global Village Construction set is a truly inspiring and unique approach to decentralization for communities. Tools are the foundation to modern construction and Open Source Ecology aims to produce 40 of the most useful tools, such as tractors, and make it possible to construct them in a simple workshop. They include all the open source plans and materials while boasting to be 1/8th less expensive than industrial equivalents.

11. Harvesting Rainwater From Your Roof

Rainwater Harvesting

Thomas Jefferson designed his house at Monticello to be sufficient, starting with the collection of rainwater, diverting the water into cisterns below the ground to irrigate the surrounding food and flower gardens. Monticello was self-sufficient in many regards. New roofing systems are free of toxic materials have become popular and allow for self-sufficient water usage.

12. Solar Water Distiller

Solar Water Distiller

Planet Earth is mostly water, yet, most of it is saltwater and not useable for human consumption. That is why this open-source water distiller was designed. It allows saltwater to be desalinated with only sunlight. The simplicity of this design is what makes it powerful.

13. Solar Hot Water Heater

Solar Hot Water Heater

Water is a great medium of heat transfer and has been used for hundreds of years to power industry. With many advances in solar technology and the simple microchip, water can be heated directly by the sun to create hot water for radiant floor heating or hot water for the shower. No need to pay an electricity company.

14. Solar Panels

Solar Panels

Solar has been around for a while, but it is still powerful and captures the imagination of people across the world. Power from the sun that shines so relentlessly on the surface of the Earth. Although, solar poses challenges to large electric grids (sun does not shine at night) it is great for individuals and decentralized grids.

15. Wind Power

Home Wind Power

Wind power generation is not just for big projects, it is easy to implement for individuals. Small wind turbines are affordable, easy to install and supplement solar, in fact, the two power-sources work well in tandem. When the sun is not shinning, there is a good chance a wind is blowing due to the atmospheric disturbance that is causing clouds to cover the sky. Plus, two power sources are better than one.

16. Mini Nuclear Reactor

Mini Nuclear Reactor

Nuclear gets a bad wrap, because it is dangerous when it explodes. But strip mining for coal is also dangerous. A solution proposed by start-up technologies is to utilize reactors of small size, the smaller the reactor the easier it is to protect in case of problems; unlike the large reactor in Japan. The saying goes, small is beautiful, but small is also safer. Small reactors can power towns and emit no greenhouse gases, plus the size of the reactor limits damage in case of a meltdown. Decentralizing small reactors would be a positive move for a more robust grid and stopping climate change.

17. Bio-Char Stoves

Bio-Char Stove

Around half of the world’s population heats and cooks with wood stoves, and these stoves are crude, producing smoke that damages the lungs of people over-time. Bio-Char Stoves allow people to cook with a hotter, cleaner heat due to an afterburner feature that reuses much of the gasses of a fire. After the fire is finished, a charcoal is leftover that is a perfect soil amendment for fields.

18. Rocket Stoves

Rocket Stove

Fireplaces are nice, but they do not use small diameter pieces of wood to heat an entire house or cook a meal. Rocket stoves allow for a fire to fully combust an entire fuel source and create an impressive amount of heat in the process. By completely consuming the fuel, there is little smoke and rocket stoves can be easily used for cooking.

19. Biogas Generators

Biogas Generator

Biogas can be created in the back yard and produce enough gas to power a stove for cooking. Thanks to simple concepts and open-source technology more people are harnessing natural gas rather than buying propane in tanks. The uses of biogas are endless but creating energy from waste products can help whole communities pull the plug on imports of fuel for home use.

20. Biodigester for Human Waste

Biodigester

We do not often like to think about it, but we humans do produce waste – and that waste can be used for gas. Using a composting toilet system with a biodigester and a gas-collector, human waste can help heat a house and run a hot water heater. By using a resource that is flushed away, that waste can lower payments to energy companies.

21. Composting Worms

Composting Worms

Its always better to have animals do hard work for us, they do not require minimum wage and they work much harder than humans. Worms are no exception. Red worms and vermiculture take care of waste and produce the best soil for plants, without creating a compost bin. Red worm bins can be stored under the kitchen sink and since the worms are so effective there is no smell from the waste you throw away.

http://waldenlabs.com/21-technologies-decentralizing-the-economy/

Ed. Nete: IMHO all of the above are great ideas except for #16 Mini Nuclear Reactors. Seriously?? First, how do we address the radioactive waste problem? Second, with  Tesla based technology’s already in operation in black projects and the Secret Space Program, we can skip the nuclear part all together. Just sayin….

Antidepressant Microbes In Soil: How Dirt Makes You Happy


Soil.

Image by amoceptum

By Bonnie L. Grant

Prozac may not be the only way to get rid of your serious blues. Soil microbes have been found to have similar effects on the brain and are without side effects and chemical dependency potential. Learn how to harness the natural antidepressant in soil and make yourself happier and healthier. Read on to see how dirt makes you happy.

Natural remedies have been around for untold centuries. These natural remedies included cures for almost any physical ailment as well as mental and emotional afflictions. Ancient healers may not have known why something worked but simply that it did. Modern scientists have unraveled the why of many medicinal plants and practices but only recently are they finding remedies that were previously unknown and yet, still a part of the natural life cycle. Soil microbes and human health now have a positive link which has been studied and found to be verifiable.

Soil Microbes and Human Health

Did you know that there’s a natural antidepressant in soil? It’s true. Mycobacterium vaccae is the substance under study and has indeed been found to mirror the effect on neurons that drugs like Prozac provide. The bacterium is found in soil and may stimulate serotonin production, which makes you relaxed and happier. Studies were conducted on cancer patients and they reported a better quality of life and less stress.

Serotonin has been linked depression, anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder and bipolar problems. The bacterium appears to be a natural antidepressant in soil and has no adverse health effects. These antidepressant microbes in soil may be as easy to use as just playing in the dirt.

Most avid gardeners will tell you that their landscape is their “happy place” and the actual physical act of gardening is a stress reducer and mood lifter. The fact that there is some science behind it adds additional credibility to these garden addicts’ claims. The presence of a soil bacteria antidepressant is not a surprise to many of us who have experienced the phenomenon ourselves. Backing it up with science is fascinating, but not shocking, to the happy gardener.

Mycrobacterium antidepressant microbes in soil are also being investigated for improving cognitive function, Crohn’s disease and even rheumatoid arthritis.

How Dirt Makes You Happy

Antidepressant microbes in soil cause cytokine levels to rise, which results in the production of higher levels of serotonin. The bacterium was tested both by injection and ingestion on rats and the results were increased cognitive ability, lower stress and better concentration to tasks than a control group.

Gardeners inhale the bacteria, have topical contact with it and get it into their bloodstreams when there is a cut or other pathway for infection. The natural effects of the soil bacteria antidepressant can be felt for up to 3 weeks if the experiments with rats are any indication. So get out and play in the dirt and improve your mood and your life.

Watch this video about how gardening makes you happy:

Resources:
“Identification of an Immune-Responsive Mesolimbocortical Serotonergic System: Potential Role in Regulation of Emotional Behavior,” by Christopher Lowry et al., published online on March 28, 2007 in Neuroscience.
http://www.sage.edu/newsevents/news/?story_id=240785
http://extension.oregonstate.edu/lane/sites/default/files/images/gg607.pdf (pg 12)
Mind & Brain/Depression and Happiness – Raw Data “Is Dirt the New Prozac?” by Josie Glausiusz, Discover Magazine, July 2007 Issue. http://discovermagazine.com/2007/jul/raw-data-is-dirt-the-new-prozac

http://www.gardeningknowhow.com/garden-how-to/soil-fertilizers/antidepressant-microbes-soil.htm

Hemp and the Decontamination of Radioactive Soil


Posted December 25th 2013

Hemp science is now advancing in leaps and bounds compared to the stagnation of the previous few decades. One significant area of research that is currently receiving particular attention is phytoremediation, or decontamination of soil—although the discovery that hemp leaches contaminants from soil has been known for some time.

The Chernobyl phytoremediation project

For over a decade, industrial hemp growing in the environs of the abandoned Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Pripyat, Ukraine has been helping to reduce soil toxicity. Now, the Japanese are considering following the same course in order to rectify the environmental damage caused by the Fukushima meltdown—however, due to the Cannabis Control Law forced into Japanese law by the occupying U.S. powers in 1948, hemp may only be grown under license—which are highly restricted and difficult to obtain.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/twicepix/

In 1989, just three years after the initial explosion, the Soviet administration of the time requested that the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) assess the environmental situation. In the 30km exclusion zone surrounding Chernobyl, high concentrations of various toxic metals including iodine, cesium-137, strontium-90 and plutonium were found in the soil, as well as in plants and animals themselves.

Which Plants are Useful in Phytoremediation?

In response, it was decided that a concerted effort to reduce soil contamination through the use of beneficial plants would be undertaken. This process, known as phytoremediation, began immediately, and used various plants to take up specific contaminants—two brassica varieties to remove chromium, lead, copper and nickel, maize to take up lead (various researchers have demonstrated the remarkable lead-uptake capability of this important crop), and more recently, sunflower and hemp.

Sunflower plantings began in 1996 subsequent to the development of a variety that promised hitherto unheard-of efficiency of decontamination; hemp plantings soon followed, in 1998. Slavik Dushenkov, a research scientist with Phytotech, one of the organisations behind the hemp plantings, stated that “hemp is proving to be one of the best phyto-remediative plants we have been able to find”.

As well as in the Ukraine, much rural land in neighbouring Belarus was affected by the explosion, and authorities there are also pursuing the use of hemp as a decontaminant. The harvest produced will be turned into ethanol, as increased production of biofuel is a key target for increasing the overall economic and environmental health of the region.   

Differences in Metal Uptake From Soil

In 2012, a Romanian study investigated the nutritional safety of hemp seed produced from plants grown in soils rich in calcium, magnesium, potassium and iron. The study determined that five distinct Romanian hemp strains developed different nutritional profiles according to uptake of the various metals in the soil. For example, the Zenit strain exhibited highest rates of calcium uptake, while the Armanca absorbed least calcium; the Diana, Denise and Silvana strains absorbed magnesium at the highest rates, and the Zenit variety showed the highest concentrations of iron.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/jacobsroom/

Despite the differences, the seeds and oil of all five strains exhibited high levels of magnesium, calcium, iron, manganese, zinc and potassium, all highly beneficial dietary metals. However, all varieties also tested above the safe legal limit for cadmium, a toxic heavy metal that may cause various health complications—despite the soil being within the safe limit for cadmium concentration. The Armanca and Silvana strains showed particularly high cadmium levels.

Hemp and Cadmium Absorption

Excessive consumption of foodstuffs high in cadmium can lead to joint and bone deformities, respiratory illness, anaemia, and kidney failure. In areas where cadmium is present in the soil, in order to be safe for human or animal consumption, hemp varieties should be selected on the basis of poor cadmium uptake.

According to a study into Chinese hemp strains conducted in 2011, many hemp strains have the ability to absorb and accumulate even large quantities of cadmium in soil without detriment to the plant itself. While this does throw up various implications for selection of sites for cultivation of food-safe hemp, it also indicates that cadmium-contaminated sites will particularly benefit from phytoremediation schemes that make primary or exclusive use of hemp. Furthermore, even if hemp used to decontaminate soil is unsafe for consumption, it can still be used in a number of industrial applications, such as for biofuel.

Hemp is Mostly Unaffected by Heavy Metals in Soil

Hemp’s resilience to contaminants in soil is well-documented. Even as early as 1975, a study published in the Agronomy Journal described how soil characteristics influenced elemental uptake and could even affect final cannabinoid profile in psychoactive strains. To illustrate this, fifteen sites with varying soil profiles were planted with the same strain of Afghan cannabis, and their harvests tested for metal content. Researchers concluded that differences could be used to determine geographic origin of cannabis through foliar analysis.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/fidot/

In 1995, the Polish Institute of Natural Fibres released a study demonstrating that tested varieties were able to withstand high levels of heavy metals in soil without impacting plant growth, yield or fibre quality. However, little research has been done into the safety of using fibres in clothing or other forms of industry, and this issue must be investigated fully in order to establish the possible uses for hemp grown in such conditions.

As a proven, valuable tool in the fight to repair human-inflicted damage to our soils and ecosystems, hemp could potentially benefit hundreds of thousands of sites across the globe—it is estimated that in the USA alone there are 30,000 sites requiring remediation. As is so often the case, US restrictions on hemp cultivation preclude any large-scale operations from being implemented, and the contaminated sites are largely left unremediated, through lack of both funding and interest on the part of the government.

http://sensiseeds.com/en/blog/hemp-decontamination-radioactive-soil/

Revolutionary Beekeeping Box Harmonizes Mankind with Bees


 

DCIM105GOPROI don’t normally look at Indiegogo campaigns… but this one caught my attention. Blowing up a $70,000 goal with a massive interest, they have generated over 2 Million Dollars in a very short amount of time with this incredible new invention that has the potential to completely change beekeeping, agriculture, and many, many other industries all at once.

Meet “Flow”, a revolutionary beehive invention, which allows you to harvest honey without opening the hive at all, and absolute zero disturbance to the bees.

“Flow is the most significant innovation in beekeeping since 1852.”

Before now, I was never a person who would buy a beekeeping rig to make my own honey…. I can no longer say that this is true. After seeing this, I am in 100%, and am excited to have a beehive that belongs to the community that I’m apart of.

In the old days, beekeeping was a full-time-job. It’s a constant labor of love to have to sedate the bee’s, take out the hives, scrape off wax, pour the honey out, clean it, and put it back…. you probably saw that in that video above.

beehive1In that process, bee’s are killed, angered, and their homes and hard work are essentially destroyed. It is not healthy for anyone, and is likely one of the many problems as to why the bee’s are all seeming to die. (That, plus all of the microwaves and vibes we are pumping out with our technology… but we’ll solve that problem next time.).

This is the beekeeepers ultimate dream come true. A safe and efficient method where you just turn the tap and watch as pure, fresh, clean honey flows right out of the hive and into your jar. No mess, no fuss, no expensive processing equipment without disturbing the bees in the least.

In exchange for a healthy and lasting home for the bees where they can be safe, they will make you all the honey you could imagine. That’s pretty amazing, wouldn’t you say?

“This really is a revolution. You can see into the hive, see when the honey is ready and take it away in such a gentle way”.

beehive2

To participate in the Indiegogo, please click here. It will help bees and it will help beekeepers all over the world, and both of those elements are very important in continuing our world to flourish. 

Thank you for reading,
Jordan

 

How to Homestead Without 100 Acres and A Cow


This post may contain affiliate links. We only recommend products and services we wholeheartedly endorse. Thank you for supporting Traditional Cooking School by GNOWFGLINS with your purchases. Our family thanks you!

How to Homestead Without 100 Acres and A Cow | When I hear the following comment: "I really want to homestead, but we're waiting until we can afford to buy an acreage." I usually respond with this:  "If you have a home, you have a homestead." Today I will share ways you can create a homestead, regardless of where you live or the resources you have (or don't have). | GNOWFGLINS.com

I frequently hear the following comment: “I really want to homestead, but we’re waiting until we can afford to buy an acreage.”

I usually respond with what a fellow homestead friend once said to me:  “If you have a home, you have a homestead.”

While the term homestead initially referred to a piece of land given to you by the government in exchange for cultivating it, Merriam-Webster defines a homestead as simply “a house and the farmland it is on.”

I believe that houses can come in any shape or size: a tent, a mobile home, a farmhouse, an apartment, or a home in a suburban neighborhood. And I believe that land can be an acreage or simply a collection of terra cotta pots assembled on a back patio.

In other words, homesteading isn’t based on the resources you have — it’s about what you do with them.

Homesteading is an attitude of the heart.

So, here are some ways you can create a homestead, regardless of where you live or the resources you have (or don’t have).

1. Gain a new perspective on your food.

I will never forget the time when, as a new gardener, I brought several heads of fresh lettuce in from the garden. Suddenly my pristine kitchen sink was filled with mud. I was somewhat taken aback by this revelation: my food comes from dirt.

The grocery store with its sparkling aisles of clean and perfect produce creates something of a buffer between us and what we eat. It’s a buffer that shields us from that fact that healthy produce is not always uniform and blemish-free. Chickens lay eggs in numerous shapes and sizes, and true whole milk needs to be shaken before drinking.

While many of us don’t have the capacity to grow everything we eat, we all can seek out ways to get more up-close-and-personal with our food. Shop as much as possible at the local farmer’s market, and make sure to ask the grower about their cultural practices. If you can’t keep your own chickens, check local Facebook groups or Craigslist for people selling fresh eggs. Seek out a source for locally-raised meat.

Cook as much from scratch as possible, eliminating as many processed foods from your diet as you can. Yes, it does require more time in the kitchen, but perhaps you could use some of your homemade goods for bartering those fresh eggs.

How to Homestead Without 100 Acres and A Cow | When I hear the following comment: "I really want to homestead, but we're waiting until we can afford to buy an acreage." I usually respond with this:  "If you have a home, you have a homestead." Today I will share ways you can create a homestead, regardless of where you live or the resources you have (or don't have). | GNOWFGLINS.com

2. Look for ways to be more self-sufficient.

Plant a small garden, even if you are limited to just a patio behind the house. So much can be grown and harvested from containers. Seek out others who are growing what you can’t and ask if you can offer a few hours of weeding in exchange for fresh vegetables. Learn where and how to purchase fresh fruits and vegetables in bulk and then freeze, can, dehydrate, or ferment the food to preserve it for later.

Preparedness and self-sufficiency are not limited to food either. Think through any potential hardships or emergencies you and your family could realistically face. Do you have a plan in case they happen? Do you have enough drinking water, batteries, candles, flashlights, etc. in the event of a power outage? Do you have a well stocked grab-and-go bag?

Do you rely on the conventional grocery store, gas station, or local convenience store? Can you reduce your reliance in any way?

You can also become more self-sufficient by learning the traditional crafts of our ancestors. Can you learn to set fence posts? Build a chicken coop? Do you own and know how to operate a sewing machine? When the need for a specific item arises, think “Is this something I can make for myself?” before you buy it.

3. Slow down the pace of your lifestyle.

Many people desire a life in the country because of the calm and peaceful surroundings. Peace, however, is an attitude of the heart — it is a function of our spirit.  Evaluate your home, your lifestyle, and your surroundings. When you walk in your front door or go about your daily routine, do you feel a sense of calm? Or do you feel stressed and rushed?

Can you reduce the areas of your life that cause stress? Are there things you can eliminate to bring a sense of quiet? Consider turning off, or even getting rid of the TV.  Can you limit errands to just a few times a month, giving yourself more time at home?

What about the atmosphere of your home? Backwoods Home Magazine recently had a fascinating article on the use of kerosene lamps (Issue #146, April-May 2014). My husband and I have purchased a few and enjoy using them in the evenings. Lighting them is a pleasant ritual: it signals the end of the day and quietly sets the tone for the next.

4. Honor the rhythm of the seasons.

The modern-day lifestyle constantly resists the natural order of things. We want light when it is dark, we want to be cool when it is hot. We want summer fruit in the middle of winter.

I believe the pattern of the seasons — rest in winter, awakening in spring, summer activity, followed again by a season of rest and reflection — was ordained for a reason. Our body, mind, and spirit need those down times in order to rejuvenate.

Regardless of where you live or what your homestead looks like, how can you incorporate the change of the seasons? Look for ways to bring the outside indoors. Eat fresh fruit and vegetables in season, or seasonal food that has been preserved. Use the long daylight hours in the summer to work hard, but give yourself a rest during the autumn and winter months. Instead of working outside in the winter, spend time indoors working with your hands. Turn in a little earlier at night. Eat warming foods like soups, stews, and casseroles.

A few final thoughts.

While the homesteading scenario will look different for each individual family, I believe we all crave the same thing: simplicity. Often however, in a move toward “simple” self-sufficiency, we take on more than we can handle. If the homestead lifestyle is new to you, go slow, enjoy the journey, and give yourself time to adjust and learn new skills.

If you long for 100 acres in the country but are limited to an apartment, bloom where you are planted and do all you can to live as self-sufficiently as possible.

At the same time, if country living is not for you, and you are very happy with a small garden and backyard chickens, there is no reason why you shouldn’t consider yourself a homesteader.

What does homesteading mean to you? What does your homestead look like?

~~~~~~~

Recommended Resources

Your Custom Homestead by Jill Winger. "Contrary to popular belief, a homesteader doesn’t have to be someone who lives on hundreds of acres with the perfect red barn and white picket fence. Your Custom Homestead is a 21-day guide to moving closer to your homesteading dreams, no matter where you live." | http://gnowfglins.com/customhomestead

Your Custom Homestead by Jill Winger. “Contrary to popular belief, a homesteader doesn’t have to be someone who lives on hundreds of acres with the perfect red barn and white picket fence. They live in apartments in the middle of the asphalt jungle. And in suburbia with mini-vans. And on a few acres on the outskirts of town. Your Custom Homestead is a 21-day guide to moving closer to your homesteading dreams, no matter where you live.” Click here for more info.

You Can Farm by Joel Salatin | You Can Farm by Joel Salatin. "While this book can be helpful to all farmers, it targets the wannabes, the folks who actually entertain notions of living, loving and learning on a piece of land. Anyone willing to dance with such a dream should be able to assess its assets and liabilities; its fantasies and realities. | http://amzn.to/1lHWGmQ

You Can Farm by Joel Salatin. “While this book can be helpful to all farmers, it targets the wannabes, the folks who actually entertain notions of living, loving and learning on a piece of land. Anyone willing to dance with such a dream should be able to assess its assets and liabilities; its fantasies and realities. “Is it really possible for me?” is the burning question this book addresses.” Click here for more info.

http://gnowfglins.com/2014/03/17/how-to-homestead-without-100-acres-and-a-cow/?utm_content=buffer4066d&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

Carrots in the car park. Radishes on the roundabout. The deliciously eccentric story of the town growing ALL its own veg


Admittedly, it sounds like the most foolhardy of criminal capers, and one of the cheekiest, too.

Outside the police station in the small Victorian mill town of Todmorden, West Yorkshire, there are three large raised flower beds.

If you’d visited a few months ago, you’d have found them overflowing with curly kale, carrot plants, lettuces, spring onions — all manner of vegetables and salad leaves.

Today the beds are bare. Why? Because people have been wandering up to the police station forecourt in broad daylight and digging up the vegetables. And what are the cops doing about this brazen theft from right under their noses? Nothing.

Food for thought: Todmorden resident Estelle Brown, a former interior designer, with a basket of home-grown veg

Food for thought: Todmorden resident Estelle Brown, a former interior designer, with a basket of home-grown veg

Well, that’s not quite correct.

‘I watch ’em on camera as they come up and pick them,’ says desk officer Janet Scott, with a huge grin. It’s the smile that explains everything.

For the vegetable-swipers are not thieves. The police station carrots — and thousands of vegetables in 70 large beds around the town — are there for the taking. Locals are encouraged to help themselves. A few tomatoes here, a handful of broccoli there. If they’re in season, they’re yours. Free.

So there are (or were) raspberries, apricots and apples on the canal towpath; blackcurrants, redcurrants and strawberries beside the doctor’s surgery; beans and peas outside the college; cherries in the supermarket car park; and mint, rosemary, thyme and fennel by the health centre.

The vegetable plots are the most visible sign of an amazing plan: to make Todmorden the first town in the country that is self-sufficient in food.

‘And we want to do it by 2018,’ says Mary Clear, 56, a grandmother of ten and co-founder of Incredible Edible, as the scheme is called.

‘It’s a very ambitious aim. But if you don’t aim high, you might as well stay in bed, mightn’t you?’

So what’s to stop me turning up with a huge carrier bag and grabbing all the rosemary in the town?

‘Nothing,’ says Mary.

What’s to stop me nabbing all the apples?

‘Nothing.’

All your raspberries?

‘Nothing.’

It just doesn’t happen like that, she says. ‘We trust people. We truly believe — we are witness to it — that people are decent.’

When she sees the Big Issue seller gathering fruit for his lunch, she feels only pleasure. What does it matter, argues Mary, if once in a while she turns up with her margarine tub to find that all the strawberries are gone?

‘This is a revolution,’ she says. ‘But we are gentle revolutionaries. Everything we do is underpinned by kindness.’

The idea came about after she and co-founder Pam Warhurst, the former owner of the town’s Bear Cafe, began fretting about the state of the world and wondered what they could do.

They reasoned that all they could do is start locally, so they got a group of people, mostly women, together in the cafe.

Incredible Edible is about more than plots of veg. It's about educating people about food, and stimulating the local economy (pictured Vincent Graff and Estelle)

Incredible Edible is about more than plots of veg. It’s about educating people about food, and stimulating the local economy (pictured Vincent Graff and Estelle)

‘Wars come about by men having drinks in bars, good things come about when women drink coffee together,’ says Mary.

‘Our thinking was: there’s so much blame in the world — blame local government, blame politicians, blame bankers, blame technology — we thought, let’s just do something positive instead.’

We’re standing by a car park in the town centre. Mary points to a housing estate up the hill. Her face lights up.

‘The children walk past here on the way to school. We’ve filled the flower beds with fennel and they’ve all been taught that if you bite fennel, it tastes like a liquorice gobstopper. When I see the children popping little bits of herb into their mouths, I just think it’s brilliant.’

She takes me over to the front garden of her own house, a few yards away.

Three years ago, when Incredible Edible was launched, she did a very unusual thing: she lowered her front wall, in order to encourage passers-by to walk into her garden and help themselves to whatever vegetables took their fancy.

There were signs asking people to take something but it took six months for folk to ‘get it’, she says.

They get it now. Obviously a few town-centre vegetable plants — even thousands of them — are not going to feed a community of 15,000 by themselves.

But the police station potatoes act as a recruiting sergeant — to encourage residents to grow their own food at home.

Today, hundreds of townspeople who began by helping themselves to the communal veg are now well on the way to self-sufficiency.

But out on the street, what gets planted where? There’s kindness even in that.

‘The ticket man at the railway station, who was very much loved, was unwell. Before he died, we asked him: “What’s your favourite vegetable, Reg?” It was broccoli. So we planted memorial beds with broccoli at the station. One stop up the line, at Hebden Bridge, they loved Reg, too — and they’ve also planted broccoli in his memory.’

Not that all the plots are — how does one put this delicately? — ‘official’.

Take the herb bushes by the canal. Owners British Waterways had no idea locals had been sowing plants there until an official inspected the area ahead of a visit by the Prince of Wales last year (Charles is a huge Incredible Edible fan).

Estelle Brown, a 67-year-old former interior designer who tended the plot, received an email from British Waterways.

‘I was a bit worried to open it,’ she says. ‘But it said: “How do you build a raised bed? Because my boss wants one outside his office window.”’

Incredible Edible is also about much more than plots of veg. It’s about educating people about food, and stimulating the local economy.

There are lessons in pickling and preserving fruits, courses on bread-making, and the local college is to offer a BTEC in horticulture. The thinking is that young people who have grown up among the street veg may make a career in food.

Crucially, the scheme is also about helping local businesses. The Bear, a wonderful shop and cafe with a magnificent original Victorian frontage, sources all its ingredients from farmers within a 30-mile radius.

There’s a brilliant daily market. People here can eat well on local produce, and thousands now do.

Meanwhile, the local school was recently awarded a £500,000 Lottery grant to set up a fish farm in order to provide food for the locals and to teach useful skills to young people.

Jenny Coleman, 62, who retired here from London, explains: ‘We need something for our young people to do. If you’re an 18-year-old, there’s got to be a good answer to the question: why would I want to stay in Todmorden?’

The day I visit, the town is battered by a bitterly-cold rain storm.  Yet the place radiates warmth. People speak to each other in the street, wave as neighbours drive past, smile.

If the phrase hadn’t been hijacked, the words ‘we’re all in this together’ would spring to mind.

So what sort of place is Todmorden (known locally, without exception, as ‘Tod’)? If you’re assuming it’s largely peopled by middle-class grandmothers, think again. Nor is this place a mecca for the gin-and-Jag golf club set.

Set in a Pennine valley — once, the road through the town served as the border between Yorkshire and Lancashire — it is a vibrant mix of age, class and ethnicity.

A third of households do not own a car; a fifth do not have central heating.

You can snap up a terrace house for £50,000 — or spend close to £1 million on a handsome stone villa with seven bedrooms.

And the scheme has brought this varied community closer together, according to Pam Warhurst.

Take one example. ‘The police have told us that, year on year, there has been a reduction in vandalism since we started,’ she says. ‘We weren’t expecting this.’

So why has it happened?

Pam says: ‘If you take a grass verge that was used as a litter bin and a dog toilet and turn it into a place full of herbs and fruit trees, people won’t vandalise it. I think we are hard-wired not to damage food.’

Pam reckons a project like Incredible Edible could thrive in all sorts of places. ‘If the population is very transient, it’s difficult. But if you’ve got schools, shops, back gardens and verges, you can do it.’

Similar schemes are being piloted in 21 other towns in the UK, and there’s been interest shown from as far afield as Spain, Germany, Hong Kong and Canada. And, this week, Mary Clear gave a talk to an all-party group of MPs at Westminster.

Todmorden was visited by a planner from New Zealand, working on the rebuilding of his country after February’s earthquake.

Mary says: ‘He went back saying: “Why wouldn’t we rebuild the railway station with pick-your-own herbs? Why wouldn’t we rebuild the health centre with apple trees?”

‘What we’ve done is not clever. It just wasn’t being done.’

The final word goes to an outsider. Joe Strachan is a wealthy U.S. former sales director who decided to settle in Tod with his Scottish wife, after many years in California.

He is 61 but looks 41. He became active with Incredible Edible six months ago, and couldn’t be happier digging, sowing and juicing fruit.

I find myself next to him, sheltering from the driving rain. Why, I ask, would someone forsake the sunshine of California for all this?

His answer sums up what the people around here have achieved.

‘There’s a nobility to growing food and allowing people to share it. There’s a feeling we’re doing something significant rather than just moaning that the state can’t take care of us.

‘Maybe we all need to learn to take care of ourselves.’

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2072383/Eccentric-town-Todmorden-growing-ALL-veg.html

 

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