Leader of Sioux Nation Issues Dire Warning to Unite Globally


Chief Arvol Looking Horse. (photo: Getty)
Chief Arvol Looking Horse. (photo: Getty)

By Jane Ayers, Reader Supported News

26 June 15

 

hief Arvol Looking Horse, spiritual leader of the Lakota, Dakota, and North Nakota tribes of the Great Sioux Nation, facilitated the 20th annual World Peace & Prayer Day/Honoring Sacred Sites ceremonies from June 18-21 in Ashland, Oregon. Looking Horse is revered worldwide for being the Keeper of the 19th Generation Sacred White Buffalo Calf Pipe Bundle. Over the four days, 1,000 participants gathered at Howard Prairie Lake to pray for world peace and healing of the earth, with thousands worldwide also lighting their “sacred fires” and joining the international prayer that focused on All Nations, All Faiths, One Prayer. The international prayer has been held in different countries over the twenty years, and Looking Horse has conducted the opening prayers to many sessions of the United Nations.

Maori elders traveled from New Zealand to bless the sacred grounds while bald eagles soared overhead. International travelers from Egypt, Canada, and Japan united with local residents and renowned tribal elders, including Agnes Baker-Pilgrim from the Siletz Tribe of Oregon, Eddie Benton Banai from the Grand Medicine Lodge (Ojibwe), Rabbi David Zaslow, and Professor David West, to pray with people united worldwide during the solstice ceremony to bring about an “energy shift” of healing.

Following are Looking Horse’s serious words for these times, from his talks over the four days, along with messages from Agnes Baker-Pilgrim, Eddie Benton Benai, Rabbi Zaslow, Paula Horne, and Professor David West.

Chief Arvol Looking Horse Addresses Seriousness of Earth Changes

“As a child I didn’t have or use guns. Now today I am a spiritual leader. I am the 19th Generation Sacred White Buffalo Calf Bundle Keeper, and yet my grandma on her deathbed said, ‘If people don’t straighten up, he’ll be the last bundle keeper for the Lakota.’

“Many world leaders have blessed this World Peace and Prayer Day: twenty years ago, H.H. the Dalai Lama gave his blessing [for our first World Peace prayer ceremony]. In South Africa, Desmond Tutu and Nelson Mandela have also blessed the prayer. That is what it will take, people who love nature and the environment. This international prayer is about the empowerment of nations to walk in beauty, because life is beautiful and sacred, and we are living with Spirit.

“On June 21st, we accomplished making history. As we came here, we heard words of the Pope talking about climate change. Scientists are now standing with First Nations on stopping tar sands extraction.

“Today we are standing together because Mother Earth is dying and is sick and has a fever. Our work doesn’t end here. We will carry on our ways for the responsibility of our children. We are faced with great challenges, because man has gone too far, and brought us to this prayer. Our grandfathers have tears in their eyes, and ask us ‘What is going on? Something strange is going on.’ My prayers in circles are focused on the water of life being affected. The signs of the white buffalo being born, along with white deer, etc., we’ve witnessed in all parts of the world, are all part of prophecy of these times.

“As years have gone by, the story of White Buffalo Calf Woman has been highlighted, as she said that white animals would be born and we’d be a voice for these animals. June 21st is the anniversary of twenty years of World Peace and Prayer Day. Twenty years ago, we started this journey when the first white buffalo was born in Janesville, Wisconsin. Almost every year since then, a white buffalo or other white animal has been born, yet soon to be killed.

“Mother Earth is going to have side effects from so much corruption, like the Tar Sands extraction. Also in Hawaii, the sacred sites are being ruined. We are going to the White House and to the United Nations to express our concerns, as our work is not done today. In the Sacred Hoop, there is no ending and no beginning. We are also working with the people of the world through the U.N.

Proclaiming the Importance of Sacred Sites

“My whole life I have been honoring sacred sites. We made a book, The Star Knowledge Book to share some of our stories, i.e., the teepee is a vortex to Great Spirit. We have come to respect the secret knowledge and language. In that sacred language, I’ve come to respect the deep responsibility we have to live in this world … to respect the energy, knowing that Mother Earth is a spirit, the Source of Life, not a resource.

“No matter where you go in the world, every culture has its own ceremonies and sacred sites. Previously we rode on horseback, walked, and ran to our sacred site, Grey Horn Butte. It is a sacred site to our people, but others call it Devil’s Tower. That language is hurting our people. We can never use that language, no foul language, as reference to our sacred site.

“I was just a young boy on the reservation in South Dakota when the elders said we need to travel back to our sacred sites. They said we needed to gather and remind people about our sacred sites. In fact, they said we need to write a book. So we went to the Seven Council Fire in Rosebud and there we chose and talked to many elders about the stories they could share. As I mentioned, we published a blue book, Star Knowledge, about the star knowledge, the universe, and the stars. I learned so much from these elders about how everything that moves has a spirit and everything has its time in this world, so I was humbled to hear the teachings: knowing how to respect life and go through all these protocols to approach, to understand it, about how to receive and give.

“We’re losing so many elders. But we had so many elders called upon who came and each spoke Lakota, and it was beautiful to hear the language. It is our way of life: the sacredness of the language. Knowing language is a crucial part, and I learned from the elders that way. The elders shared about the sacred sites and the star knowledge, and how beautiful it is to listen to their message. That which lies deep within the Source has truly inspired the life of all things, everything, we live with it in spirit that way. I was a young man and I never thought it would be my life: the voice, the spirit of our way of life, our ceremonies.

We Must Unite Now – We Are at a Crossroads

“The prophecies say someday that time will come again when all nations will stand shoulder-to-shoulder in a sacred circle. The prophecies say because we aren’t watching where we’re going, that Great Spirit will bring us back into that circle.

“From the heart of Mother Earth, we have a message that all these white animals are being born, and this message is for all the world: We must unite as all nations and one prayer.

“We are at a crossroads faced with chaos, disasters, sicknesses and viruses. There are tears in our elder’s eyes. We must unite. We are all being faced with tragedies and disasters, and volcanos are beginning to erupt worldwide. These Northwest territories are speaking to us of volcanos. Yellowstone National Park could erupt with super-volcanos anytime.

“We soon will see the 4th of July fireworks, but what about Mother Earth’s fireworks with all the volcanos of the world erupting?

“The climate is changing. If only the trees, water, and rivers could speak, they’d tell us their story. In that tree, every year is a circle. In our life, we have a cycle of life and we too are part of the growing of that tree. We have our seasonal ceremonies, so our way we are taught, we learn from every person and all the teachers who have gone before, some known and some not, some written about, some not, but we still have their voice today. I’m honored by wise words they shared and left behind. Every time we have our spirit bowl/plate we are offering to those who have gone before us.

A Blessing and a Warning

“We are networking through modern technology but our ceremonies have been saying this for a long time about the Earth and climate change. The message of the white animals being born worldwide is there’s a blessing and a warning that we, of this generation, are facing chaos, disaster, big winds, tornados, and flooding. Prayer is the answer.

“In 1995, the first white buffalo was born in Janesville, Wisconsin, and we took a message there. Today, the message is still the same, with white animals being born, not just white buffalo calves, but white animals born all over the world. The message is that Mother Earth is sick and has a fever.

“We took the message to the U.N. that mankind has taken this too far, and only through prayer will a healing come back to Mother Earth. If we don’t do this, Mother Earth will shake herself and volcanos will erupt. It is only through prayer that we can create an energy shift and make changes for the sake of our children. This message is still the same today. The Kobi also came to the U.N. too and shared their message with us. There is so much affecting the environment: the Keystone Pipeline, droughts, earthquakes, the air and water being hurt. Mother Earth is speaking to us.

How to Be Ready

“How can we be ready for what is coming in the future? It is through the people having enough faith and belief, and to calm their spirit – to believe something can change. I hope this country can stop the fracking. All our elders are saying, ‘Return to the sacred.’

“You have to have a good mind if you’re going to help the People. If not, it affects people who don’t think, then use guns. The foods we eat from Monsanto are not good.

“We are part of this global community. I hope we can create an energy shift and that even Republicans and Democrats would too have a greater understanding of what’s happening to Mother Earth at this time.

“We are here because there is something we’re being called upon to do. We know something is wrong and we don’t want to face it except to face it spiritually. We are praying to the Sacred Fire, and people all over the world are in tune with us and in prayer with us.

Looking Horse Urges All to Work for Environment

“We received news today, June 21st, that a U.N. Declaration is being taken today to the Secretary General of the U.N. calling for an establishment of an Indigenous United Nations to reflect the accumulation of thousands of years of knowledge, and for the protection of future generations. In addition, they attached a proclamation of the ‘vision of Arvol Looking Horse and his World Peace and Prayer Day’ with an emphasis ‘to exhibit concern for all life and to pray for global healing’ and to proclaim the ‘importance of caring for sacred sites.’

“It referred to Iroquois Chief Leon Shenandoah’s prophecy thirty years ago that referred to the ‘end of life when trees start dying from the treetops downward, then nothing will grow.’ It referred to spiritual consciousness being the highest form of politics. It further called on the abolishment of nuclear bombs, and further affirmed that ‘We are the spiritual energy and are 1000x stronger than nuclear energy.’ We cannot trade the welfare of our children, and must abolish nuclear threats. It also requested the Papal Bulls (Manifest Destiny) be officially rescinded.

“You too can be a peace leader and work with the environment. That fate is in you, and no more are we alone. We are a global community and faced with global challenges, but through prayer we set an agenda for the future for world peace. Life is sacred and we are part of this global community. I hope we can all create an energy shift with prayer.

“People all over the world have been in contact us through the different communications we have today. To the people who have helped us with this spiritual journey for the past twenty years, I want to say, ‘Thank you for believing, and I truly believe each and every one of you can share this with your heart.’ Cherish what Creator gave you as this Life is sacred, the fire is sacred, and the water of life is sacred. There’s so much we have to live with, and everything has a Spirit, and that Great Spirit gave us life.

“The Sacred Fire is a spirit, and the Water of Life is a spirit. In that circle, there is not one person higher than another. In the sacred hoop, all are leaders. As we started our sacred fire for the ceremony, there is no ending, no beginning. We are part of the cycle of life and we have a responsibility.

“We pray someday June 21st will be an international holiday. As we stand here, people are gathering at their sacred sites worldwide.

“We need a lot more of you in the world to pray for peace because it is not good what we are facing. In our prayers, we have dignity, honor, and respect. If we live it, our children will have it too. The elders say you are not alone in this world because you always have your ancestors, so never say you are all alone.”

Agnes Baker-Pilgrim Honored at World Peace & Prayer Day

Agnes Baker-Pilgrim, 91, is the oldest living member of the Takilma Tribe in Oregon, and a member of the Siletz Tribe. She is also the head of the 13 International Indigenous Grandmothers Council, and her family has conducted an annual Salmon ceremony on the Rogue and Applegate Rivers for close to two decades. Her daughter and son, Nadine and Keith Martin, provided a smaller version of this traditionally-cooked salmon feast for the World Peace and Prayer Day, and Agnes addressed the participants over the four days:

“It’s people like Arvol Looking Horse who help us have world peace. We all have the honor that our ancestors left us their unfinished work to take care of this planet: ozone hole, smog in the cities, trash in the oceans and rivers, GMOs, massive cutting of trees, tops of mountains being mined, global warming causing ice melts.

“All this destruction is damaging the 7th generation and the unborn yet to come. We have to do better so they can grow up and have white hair like me, and also have a world with clean water and air. We have to start with these little people, because the world and the future is theirs.

“I have been part of the Salmon Nation all my life. If you live by the streams, rivers, lakes, oceans, protect them. Don’t throw any trash in the waters.

“If I can be a voice for the voiceless at age 91, what’s your excuse? I care and I know you care what happens to the animal habitats in the water. We can’t live without the animals.

“If you have one foot in this world and one in the other like me at my age, you had better walk your talk. I hope all will give prayers for Chief Arvol Looking Horse, prayers as he carries the Sacred Pipe. You know the karma if one doesn’t carry it right, and he walks his talk.

“Creator can answer prayer. Walk your talk because prayer really works. Love one another. Take care of the children and hug the little ones a lot. Say thank you for being here for me. Because of the love of my kids and grandkids and great grandkids, I am here at the age of 91. It’s their love that is why I am sitting here. With the Maori dancing here, I wanted to dance too. Prayer works, and I’m not talking ‘church.’

“In Jefferson, Oregon, I did the ribbon-cutting for the nation’s only veterans wall memorial, dedicated specifically for Native veterans and Code talkers, finally all together. Don’t forget the biggest contingency of our U.S. forces have been Native.

“I care and speak about the salmon, the water, the condors which are the thunderbirds, getting the lead out of bullets [to prevent contamination to predators eating wildlife killed by hunters], to stop the clear-cutting of our forests, spraying of 2,4,5-T herbicides, no spraying along the highways, save the bees, and no GMOs. I prayed and blessed thirty-nine condors in Portland. It won’t be long until they’ll fly overhead.

“Magic happens. Creator can do that. It’s One God, many paths, so don’t use your path as a sword. We are all in this leaky canoe together.

“When I cooked salmon for Martha Stewart years ago at one of my Salmon gatherings, as she was putting the salmon on our redwood sticks, I told her, ‘after eating salmon cooked traditionally, you’ll throw away your frying pan.’ (When you eat salmon, thank the tree people too because the wood is used for the fire, and also we put the salmon onto redwood sticks to traditionally cook them).

“We are all water babies. Take care of the water wherever you are. At least once a day, give thanks to Mother Earth for all you have, all you eat, even your jewelry, automobiles, cell phones, everything comes from the Earth, and is made from the Earth’s resources. I pray that I walk my talk. Know that all there is is love, and there’s a purpose for you. You come to a ceremony on one level, and then go home on a higher level. Creator has a hand on you.”

Elder Eddie Benton Banai, of the Grand Medicine Lodge, Ojibwe:

“We are all related. The elders have been saying for generations that either people protect the Earth and water, or else there will be no life … As we look around today, there is consciousness rising, an awareness of this. But we are fast running out of time. Civilization has become an enemy of the People, and the leaders of this civilization don’t see Mother Earth is living…. Republicans and multinational corporations have no feeling for the People. Even the Bible says you even if you have all the money in the world, what about at the end of the road? Money is not the only thing important. Yes, money is necessary but it is Life itself that is most important. Man might own the watch on his wrist, but the watch shouldn’t own the man. We are running out of time, and how the Earth is being ruined, we might only have four more of these World Peace and Prayer Days. 72% of the world’s drinking water is already contaminated. If all the water is destroyed, we are all gone too. To save the Earth, put down your biases and differences, and begin walking and working together.

“Our stories began 50,000 years ago, and that is a little bit longer than 1492. Since 1492, nearly all indigenous languages have been destroyed. It is good we have men like Arvol Looking Horse who know about responsibility.

“The consciousness needs to continue after four days here. How many days ago on CNN did we see the murders in the church? Who’s raising these kids? Be active and talk about the elimination of drugs in our communities and our nation.”

Additional Speakers Add Their Support

Rabbi David Zaslow of Ashland’s Havurah Synagogue emphasized an understanding that “It is all nations, not one nation. It’s all religions, not one religion. It’s all, not one.”

Former SOU professor David West stated, “In over 300 tribes, there is no word in their languages for ‘failing.’ Yes there are words for ‘mistakes or learning from mistakes’ but no words for ‘failure,’ so there is hope for us all.”

Looking Horse’s wife, Paula Horne, pointed out, “NASA scientists have said we are at a point of no return. We are here to prove it different and be a ripple effect. If we could do this worldwide, we could heal the earth.”

Looking Horse Urges People to Make Their Choice Now

In White Buffalo Teachings, another of his books, Looking Horse states:

“We are the watchers. We are the witnesses. We see what has gone before. We see what happens now, at this dangerous moment in human history. We see what’s going to happen, what will surely happen unless we come together – we, the Peoples of all Nations – to restore peace, harmony and balance to the Earth, our Mother … We must understand the two ways we are free to follow, as we choose: the positive way or the negative way, the spiritual way or the material way. It’s our own choice, each of our and all of our choices. You yourself are the one who must decide. You alone, and only you, can make this crucial choice. Whatever you decide is what you’ll be, to walk in honor or to dishonor your relatives. You can’t escape the consequences of your own decision. On your decision, yes, on your own personal decision, depends the fate of the entire World. We are the only species destroying Mother Earth! You must decide. You can’t avoid it.

“Each of us is put here in this time and this place to personally decide the future of humankind. Did you think the Creator would create unnecessary people in a time of such terrible danger? My Grandmother once told me to understand that every person can have a good heart, a heart big enough to change the world! She said the Great Spirit wouldn’t give us something we couldn’t handle!

“Know that you yourself are essential to this World. Believe that! Understand both the blessing and the burden of that. You yourself are desperately needed to save the soul of this World. Did you think you were put here for something less?”


Jane Ayers is an independent journalist (stringer with USA Today, Los Angeles Times) and regularly contributes to Reader Supported News. She can be reached at JaneAyersMedia@gmail.com

http://readersupportednews.org/opinion2/277-75/30957-leader-of-sioux-nation-issues-dire-warning-to-unite-globally

Seattle Swaps Columbus Day For ‘Indigenous Peoples’ Day’


 

October 12, 2014 2:55 PM ET
Native American protesters have been demonstrating against Columbus Day in Seattle for several years. Protest organizers say Columbus should not be credited with discovering the Western Hemisphere at a time when it was already inhabited.

Native American protesters have been demonstrating against Columbus Day in Seattle for several years. Protest organizers say Columbus should not be credited with discovering the Western Hemisphere at a time when it was already inhabited.

Elaine Thompson/AP

This year’s Columbus Day holiday will have a slightly different, more Native flavor in the city of Seattle. Thanks to a unanimous vote this summer by the city council, the federal holiday will now be known by a different name: Indigenous Peoples’ Day.

The name change comes after activists pushed for a day to honor indigenous people instead of Christopher Columbus, the most recognizable figure linked to European contact with the Americas.

“This is about taking a stand against racism and discrimination,” Seattle City Council member Kshama Sawant told the Seattle Times. “Learning about the history of Columbus and transforming this day into a celebration of indigenous people and a celebration of social justice … allows us to make a connection between this painful history and the ongoing marginalization, discrimination and poverty that indigenous communities face to this day.”

On Monday, the streets of Seattle will likely be filled with drums, singing and the faces of citizens from the city’s surrounding Native Nations: the Lummi, Nooksack, Tulalip, Sauk-Suiattle, Swinomish, Puyallup, Colville and 22 other Washington tribes, as well as citizens from other Indian Nations that call Seattle home.

Seattle isn’t the first place to give the holiday a makeover. Earlier this year, the Minneapolis City Council also renamed Columbus Day Indigenous Peoples’ Day. South Dakota celebrates Native American Day in “remembrance of the great Native American leaders who contributed so much to the history of our state.” Hawaii observes Discoverers’ Day, in which Polynesian explorers are honored.

Of course, not everybody is happy about these changes. The AP reports that some Italian-Americans in Seattle have been upset by the change because it comes “at the expense of what essentially is Italian Heritage Day.” But for those who have a negative view of Columbus’ impact, the new name honors a legacy of struggle and resistance.

In the past, anti-Columbus Day protesters have clashed with the holiday’s supporters, most notably in Denver, where members of the American Indian Movement have taken to the streets almost yearly since the late 1980s. Those protests have quieted down in recent years, although those annual demonstrations frequently ended in arrests.

But anti-Columbus sentiment is hardly limited to the U.S. In Chile, Mapuche activists launched anti-Columbus demonstrations that turned violent last year. In 2002, indigenous people in Guatemala protested the day by shutting down highways across the country. Today, many countries in Latin America —including Mexico, El Salvador and Argentina — recognize Dia de la Raza, while in Venezuela, the holiday has been renamed the Day of Indigenous Resistance.

In the U.S., the bigger issue now is whether the holiday can survive as a growing number of cities and states decide to do away with it. According to the Pew Research Center, it’s already “one of the most inconsistently celebrated U.S. holidays.” Apart from federal employees, workers in only 23 states are given a paid day off to observe the holiday.

http://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2014/10/12/354274630/seattle-swaps-columbus-day-for-indigenous-peoples-day

Note: Way to go Seattle! Next should Thanksgiving, renamed Indigenous Peoples Rememberance Day in memory of the 100’s of millions of precious souls that lost their lives to the barbaric era of colonialism.

Differences In Consciousness by Chief Luther Standing Bear


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Nothing the Great Mystery placed in the land of the Indian pleased the white man, and nothing escaped his transforming hand. Wherever forests have not been mowed down, wherever the animal is recessed in their quiet protection, wherever the earth is not bereft of four-footed life – that to him is an “unbroken wilderness”

But, because for the Lakota there was no wilderness, because nature was not dangerous but hospitable, not forbidding but friendly, Lakota philosophy was healthy – free from fear and dogmatism. And here I find the great distinction between the faith of the Indian and the white man. Indian faith sought the harmony of man with his surroundings; the other sought the dominance of surroundings.

In sharing, in loving all and everything, one people naturally found a due portion of the thing they sought, while, in fearing, the other found the need of conquest.

For one man the world was full of beauty, for the other it was a place of sin and ugliness to be endured until he went to another world, there to become a creature of wings, half-man and half-bird.

Forever one man directed his Mystery to change the world He (God) had made. Forever this man pleaded with Him to chastise his wicked ones; and forever he implored his God to send His light to earth. Small wonder this man could not understand the other.

But the old Lakota was wise. He knew that a man’s heart, away from nature, becomes hard; he knew that lack of respect for growing, living things soon led to lack of respect for humans, too. So he kept his children close to nature’s softening influence.”

~Chief Luther Standing Bear~
(1868 – 1939)

Source

Mark Plotkin: What the people of the Amazon know that you don’t


“The greatest and most endangered species in the Amazon rainforest is not the jaguar or the harpy eagle,” says Mark Plotkin, “It’s the isolated and uncontacted tribes.” In an energetic and sobering talk, the ethnobotanist brings us into the world of the forest’s indigenous tribes and the incredible medicinal plants that their shamans use to heal. He outlines the challenges and perils that are endangering them — and their wisdom — and urges us to protect this irreplaceable repository of knowledge.

Beyond a Formal Acknowledgement ~ The Symbolic Lie of Reconciliation and the Continued Genocide of Indigenous People’s thru Colonialism


TreatiesImage from the First Peoples Guide for Newcomers, published by the City of Vancouver (2014)

On June 24th, 2014, Vancouver city council voted unanimously to formally acknowledge that the city is built on the unceded territory of the Musqueam, Tsleil-Waututh, and Squamish Indigenous peoples. After more than a century of denial and erasure, the motion might have opened the way for real change in Vancouver. And yet when the motion was put forward, Councillor Andrea Reimer told the media that the gesture wouldn’t affect the legal practices of the City of Vancouver. “[Reimer] isn’t concerned,” reported the Toronto Sun, “about possible legal ramifications of declaring the city is on unceded territory because Vancouver is not involved in treaty negotiations and has no such authority over land.”

A few weeks later, the City of Vancouver withheld its reconciliatory gesture when it ignored the assertion of Aboriginal Land title by the residents of Oppenheimer park, moving instead to issue a series of eviction notices for the mostly-Indigenous residents. Formal recognition of colonial dispossession, it seemed, came with serious limitations. What exactly do the City’s words without action mean for reconciliation? At Oppenheimer the City of Vancouver and Parks Board did what governments of its kind have done since this land has been colonized: they ignored the voice of Indigenous people and continued on with the long legacy of state-sanctioned dispossession and violence.

Atrociously violent actions of colonialism are numerous throughout history and across Canada. This includes government-sanctioned starvation and nutritional testing, land dispossession and creation of the reserve system, deliberate spread of disease, abuses within the residential school system, and disproportionate numbers of Indigenous peoples in Canadian federal prisons (23 percent) and foster care (almost 50 percent). These atrocities were not, and are not, possible without facilitation by politicians.

These are the many ways in which politicians and politics have been, and are, enforcers of the colonial project. In the late nineteenth century Prime minister John A. Macdonald increased the rate at which European settlers colonized and ‘developed’ western Canada by creating policy that allowed Canadian officials to withhold food from Indigenous communities until they starved to death. Under the United Nations Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide (CPPCG), adopted on December 9, 1948, this policy constitutes an act of genocide.

The horrifying acts and behaviours mentioned are symptomatic of colonialism, which Gord Hill (Kwakwaka’wakw nation) describes in these terms:

[Colonialism is] the practice of invading other lands and territories, for the purpose of settlement and/or resource exploitation. When an invading force confronts an Indigenous population already occupying a territory, colonialism becomes a violent conflict between two hostile and opposing ways of life, with one attempting to impose its will on the other. This is a standard definition of war, and colonization itself can be considered a war for territory involving all the means used to carry out wars: military, political, economic, psychological, diplomatic, cultural, etc.[1]

While this definition highlights the violent force of colonialism, Eve Tuck and K. Wayne Yang highlight the importance of land, and how its commodification is integral to the success of the settler colonial project:“Land is what is most valuable, contested, required. This is both because the settlers make Indigenous land their new home and source of capital […] land is remade into property and human relationships to land are restricted to the relationship of the owner to his property.”[2] From its infancy, Canada, and its settler cities, have benefitted economically from the genocide of Indigenous communities. In a local context, Indigenous people, as is common in settler cities, live in impoverished conditions. According to the 2006 census, Indigenous people make up two percent of the total population of Vancouver, ten percent of the total population of the Downtown Eastside, and thirty percent of the homeless population.[3]

A Settler Move to Innocence

Vancouver City Council and other political parties are praised for their formal acknowledgement of the city’s occupation of unceded territory, even if it does little to change the everyday conditions of Indigenous peoples (poverty, dispossession, criminality, premature death). This gesture is what Tuck and Yang would define as a “settler move to innocence,” a strategy or positioning that attempts to relieve feelings of guilt or responsibility of a settler without the settler giving up land, power, privilege or changing much at all.[4] Gestures of remorse or acknowledgement may endow the settler with “professional kudos or a boost in their reputations for being so sensitive or self-aware.” For example, David Schaepe, director and senior archaeologist of the Sto:lo Research and Resource Management Centre and technical advisor for the Sto:lo Xwexwilmexw Treaty Association, has congratulated city council on its formal recognition and called it a “very positive development.” Despite the fact that the formal acknowledgment has been received positively in the media, Tuck and Yang warn that settler moves to innocence are hollow and only serve the interests of settlers. Such actions lend false legitimacy to settler governments, allow the ongoing work of dispossession, displacement, and settlement.

“You’re never going to gain the full recognition of your freedom from your oppressor,” argues Glen Coulthard, member of the Dene Nation and author of Red Skin, White Masks, in an interview. “They will only recognize you to the extent that it serves their own interests. The effect that that recognition being given to you has on the dominated or the colonized is that they come to see that gift of recognition as a form of justice or decolonization itself. You think recognition is actually freedom and decolonization, but it’s really colonization in a new form.” The recognition that Vancouver city council has offered to Indigenous peoples only extends to the acknowledgement that Vancouver occupies unceded territory. This primarily benefits Vancouver city council and other political parties because it creates a semblance of sensitivity and self-awareness. The formal acknowledgement falls short because it only acknowledges one aspect of settler colonialism rather than the multitude of ongoing violence and traumas. It does not recognize the historical or ongoing role of Vancouver city council in settler colonization through practices such as policing and community dispersal of the Downtown Eastside community, where economically marginalized Indigenous peoples are over-represented.[4] Nor does it begin to engage in the difficult work of moving beyond metaphors and gestures and towards changing the material conditions underlying the daily warfare of colonization.

In addition, the Vancouver motion calls for council and city staff to “develop appropriate protocols for the City of Vancouver to use in conducting City business that respect the traditions of welcome, blessing, and acknowledgement of the territory.” What the motion does not call for are decolonizing protocols that shift power and privilege from settlers to Indigenous peoples, nor does it acknowledge colonization as an ongoing process that actively dispossesses Indigenous peoples of their way of life through land theft. This clearly shows that Vancouver city council, and other political parties, do not intend to dismantle the system and structures that benefit settlers. Instead, the goal is to protect City business and the perpetuation of the settler colonial project, free of feelings of guilt or responsibility–thanks to this tokenistic gesture.

Vancouver city council, past and present, perpetuates the poverty and dispossession of Indigenous peoples. These actions benefit not only settlers, but also make the legal and economic existence of Vancouver itself possible. The city council motion to recognize unceded territories operates in tandem with the established economic and political interests of Vancouver. To underline the continued protection of those interests, Mayor Gregor Robertson spoke to media, saying that landowners and businesses “shouldn’t worry” because the formal recognition of occupying unceded territory is largely symbolic.

In a recent interview on Mainlander Radio, Diana Day, a member of the Oneida Nation, shared her thoughts on the formal acknowledgment:

We have the worst rate of almost everything that’s negative happening to us and yet they don’t put us at the table to say “What can do we do? How can we change that?” They sit in rooms and make decisions for us, or not. They don’t have an Indigenous person right on council who’s able to provide that input and if they have no vested interest in the issues around homelessness, and mental health. There’s not a strong Aboriginal voice who’s at the table who is discussing these things, and who’s advocating for these things, so until that happens, I think a lot of things are just words. It’s just an acknowledgement, it’s not meaningful. I think it has a lot to do with actions speaking louder than words, so if you were really sincere about this, then you should have Indigenous people on your slate, on every slate, not just in one area because I think we need to be represented at all meetings, and at all discussions.

For Day, the failure of the city’s formal acknowledgement lies in the fact that it remains “largely symbolic,” as the Mayor also said. It does not engage in meaningful action that work towards Indigenous sovereignty, nor does it even attempt to challenge the decision-making process of settler colonial governments. The inclusion of Indigenous decision-makers, not just voices, is not even considered. This, in addition to the city’s recent rejection of Indigenous peoples’ legitimate title claim at Oppenheimer Park, shows that settlers will continue to act in their own interests until there is an intervention against settler colonialism.

The Role of the Municipal Government in Settler Colonialism

Despite Reimer’s claim to that the municipal government has no authority over Indigenous land, Vancouver city council maintains settler colonialism through specific means: upholding claims to private property, enforcing property laws through state-sanctioned police violence, re-zoning and development decisions, and lastly by profiting directly from the sale and taxation of land.[6] Through taxation and zoning, the municipal government has the ability to eliminate or encourage specific land uses throughout the city. For example, the area known today as Stanley Park was inhabited by Indigenous peoples until it became a park in 1888, following a slew of evictions from the park. Indigenous families continued living in the park and were continually evicted until the 1930. This was a political move by the city which removed Indigenous peoples from a key source of settler flows of capital, people, and goods. The city also maintains colonial structures and systems through lobbying (or neglect of) higher levels of government. This list is not exhaustive; rather, it identifies some of the ways in which the municipal government upholds settler colonialism and is able to exercise authority over land, contrary to the City’s claim. The formal acknowledgement reinforces the colonial perception of land as private property. What is necessary today, and will not come easily, is to de-center the conversation from ownership of land, which is a largely European colonial concept, and instead imagine, and pursue, the meaningful action that could follow if Vancouver city council and settlers truly sought to challenge the perception of land as property under an illegitimate colonial legal system. [7]

“We want to make sure we’ve done the appropriate steps with the three local First Nations to understand exactly what should be said according to their traditions and customs,” Robertson said. “We just want to make sure we’re observing those correctly and bringing them into the modern context as well.” While this is perceived as a move away from settler colonialism, it only further entrenches Vancouver city council in the settler colonial project. As Scott Morgensen writes, “Historically, non-Natives became settlers by adapting Indigenous dwelling sites, travel routes, place names, modes of gathering or cultivating food, and spiritual knowledges and practices. These acts are part of the normative function of conquest and settlement.” The adaptation of Indigenous place names, customs, or knowledge into the business and function of settler cities is part of colonialism. These practices do not embody a responsibility to dismantle and interrogate the material conditions of settler colonialism. The formal acknowledgement does not, then, enter into the difficult territory of challenging colonial structures and systems of land and property – property which necessitates an owner and the protection of the landowner’s rights by a colonial legal system and state sanctioned violence. Furthermore, this gesture does not sufficiently acknowledge the ongoing traumas of colonialism, nor the ways in which municipal politics are implicit in reinforcing and reproducing settler colonialism.

In the words of Andrea Smith, settler colonialism is not undone by “individuals confessing their privileges or trying to think themselves into a new subject position, but through the creation of collective structures that dismantle the systems that enable these privileges.”[7] Gord Hill defines the political terms in which the undoing of settler colonialism might be undertaken: “this means a radical de-centralization of national power (i.e., the dismantling of the nation-state) and the establishment of local autonomy (community & region, traditionally the village and tribal nation).”[9] The limitations of the City of Vancouver’s recent territory acknowledgement tell us that much more should be demanded from those who hold power and benefit from the systems and structures of settler colonialism.

The work needed to dismantle the systems and structures that privilege settler colonialism will not be easy. As David Harvey wrote in Right to the City, “We can dream and wonder about alternative urban worlds. With enough perseverance and power we can even hope to build them.” Today, we must create other worlds because the one we live in normalizes genocide and colonization. We must re-imagine our relationships to the land and each other beyond a settler colonial framework, and cultivate it collectively. This requires decolonizing our spaces and relationships, and unlike the formal acknowledgement, it will not be symbolic.

+

Notes

[1] Colonization Decolonization by Zig Zag (aka Gord Hill) http://warriorpublications.files.wordpress.com/2011/03/colonization-decolonization.pdf

[2] Decolonization is not a metaphor by Eve Tuck and K. Wayne Yang, http://decolonization.org/index.php/des/article/view/18630/15554

[3] Unsettling the Politics of Exclusion: Aboriginal Activism and the Vancouver Downtown East Side by Donna Shatz.

[4] Ibid., 1.

[5] Municipal Colonialism in Vancouver: City Planning and the Conflict over Indian Reserves, 1928-1950s by Jordan Stanger-Ross.

[6] The colonialism that is settled and the colonialism that never happened by Andrea Smith.

[7] The Problem with “Privilege” by Andrea Smith, quoted by Laura Hurwitz & Shawn Bourque in Settler Colonialism Primer

http://unsettlingamerica.wordpress.com/2014/06/06/settler-colonialism-primer/

[8] Ibid., 8.

http://themainlander.com/2015/01/07/beyond-a-formal-acknowledgement/

Stand with the Apache: No mining on sacred land!


Note: The attack on tribal sacred lands has gone overboard with corporate entities attempting to desecrate ancient sacred sites, while stripping every last resource available. Please join me in standing with the Apache in one BIG HELL “NO” to Congress in handing over Oak Flats to “foreign” a mining company.
The Apache join Hawai’i’Ti’s Kanaka Maoli (TMT Telescope on Mauan Kea) and tribes worldwide in protecting and preserving sacred lands.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The US government is about to handover a beautiful stretch of national forest held sacred by the local Apache tribe — to a giant foreign mining company. It’s a national disgrace, but if we come together now we have a real chance to block the mine.

Our country’s shameful, criminal mistreatment of Native Americans is no secret. And when Arizona lawmakers snuck this mining proposal into a critical national defense bill last year, Apache leaders and activists vowed to fight back. That pressure is working and right now Congress is considering whether to stop the mining project. If we back the Apache’s call with tens of thousands of voices nationwide, we can help protect this land for good.

Next month, tribal leaders are planning a cross-country trip to DC to defend the land that’s hosted important ceremonies for generations. If enough of us stand with the Apache, we can meet them on arrival and build a huge groundswell of support for their courageous fight on Capitol Hill. Sign now:

https://secure.avaaz.org/en/stand_with_the_apache_loc/?bHGVHeb&v=61248

The Oak Flat area of the Tonto National Forest in Arizona has had protected status since the Eisenhower Administration, out of recognition of its natural beauty and cultural significance. The local San Carlos Apache use if for coming of age ceremonies and other rituals. And repeated attempts to open the land up to mining have failed to pass Congress. That’s why Arizona’s Senators John McCain and Jeff Flake’s decision to tie the provision to a critical national defense vote last year was so cynical.

Supporters of the mining plan say it will bring jobs to the area, but local leaders question the benefits and highlight the cost. And that cost is clear: A massive 2 mile-long copper mine at Oak Flat would destroy a holy site that Apache have used since time immemorial. It boggles the mind that in 2015 the US government is still stomping on Native American rights like this, at the behest of foreign mining interests to boot.

Let’s join the fight to protect this sacred land. When enough of us have signed to get Congress’s attention, we’ll deliver our call to leaders in Congress and stand shoulder to shoulder with the Apache to defend against this attack on their heritage. Sign now and spread the word:

https://secure.avaaz.org/en/stand_with_the_apache_loc/?bHGVHeb&v=61248

From the Brazil to Tanzania, our community has stood behind local communities protecting their natural and cultural heritage. Now we have a critical opportunity to make sure our own government honors its commitments and moral responsibility to the Apache.

With hope and determination,

Nick, Joseph, Rewan, Emma and the rest of the Avaaz team

More Information:

Selling Off Apache Holy Land (New York Times)
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/29/opinion/selling-off-apache-holy-land.html

Tribe’s protest of mine plan near Superior is in 3rd week (Arizona Daily Star)
http://tucson.com/news/state-and-regional/tribe-s-protest-of-mine-plan-near-superior-is-in/article_f551fab1-853b-5826-9037-9ddb3739e5fc.html

Apache tribe distressed by privatization of sacred land (Arizona Daily Star)
http://tucson.com/news/apache-tribe-distressed-by-privatization-of-sacred-land/article_c8f9f32c-80c0-11e4-a781-a7334409bcc3.html

Save Oak Flat
http://www.apache-stronghold.com

Opponents renew fight against Superior copper mine
http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/arizona/politics/2015/06/17/superior-copper-mine-congress-bill-stop/28894741/

US should return stolen land to Indian tribes, says United Nations


UN’s correspondent on indigenous peoples urges government to act to combat ‘racial discrimination’ felt by Native Americans


US should return stolen land to Indian tribes, says United Nations
A Native American at his home on Pine Ridge Reservation, South Dakota, which has some of the US’s poorest living conditions. Photograph: Jennifer Brown/Star Ledger/Corbis

Chris McGreal in Washington

Friday 4 May 2012

A United Nations investigator probing discrimination against Native Americans has called on the US government to return some of the land stolen from Indian tribes as a step toward combatting continuing and systemic racial discrimination.

James Anaya, the UN special rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples, said no member of the US Congress would meet him as he investigated the part played by the government in the considerable difficulties faced by Indian tribes.

Anaya said that in nearly two weeks of visiting Indian reservations, indigenous communities in Alaska and Hawaii, and Native Americans now living in cities, he encountered people who suffered a history of dispossession of their lands and resources, the breakdown of their societies and “numerous instances of outright brutality, all grounded on racial discrimination”.

“It’s a racial discrimination that they feel is both systemic and also specific instances of ongoing discrimination that is felt at the individual level,” he said.
Anaya said racism extended from the broad relationship between federal or state governments and tribes down to local issues such as education.

“For example, with the treatment of children in schools both by their peers and by teachers as well as the educational system itself; the way native Americans and indigenous peoples are reflected in the school curriculum and teaching,” he said.

“And discrimination in the sense of the invisibility of Native Americans in the country overall that often is reflected in the popular media. The idea that is often projected through the mainstream media and among public figures that indigenous peoples are either gone or as a group are insignificant or that they’re out to get benefits in terms of handouts, or their communities and cultures are reduced to casinos, which are just flatly wrong.”

Close to a million people live on the US’s 310 Native American reservations. Some tribes have done well from a boom in casinos on reservations but most have not.
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Anaya visited an Oglala Sioux reservation where the per capita income is around $7,000 a year, less than one-sixth of the national average, and life expectancy is about 50 years.

The two Sioux reservations in South Dakota – Rosebud and Pine Ridge – have some of the country’s poorest living conditions, including mass unemployment and the highest suicide rate in the western hemisphere with an epidemic of teenagers killing themselves.

“You can see they’re in a somewhat precarious situation in terms of their basic existence and the stability of their communities given that precarious land tenure situation. It’s not like they have large fisheries as a resource base to sustain them. In basic economic terms it’s a very difficult situation. You have upwards of 70% unemployment on the reservation and all kinds of social ills accompanying that. Very tough conditions,” he said.

Anaya said Rosebud is an example where returning land taken by the US government could improve a tribe’s fortunes as well as contribute to a “process of reconciliation”.

“At Rosebud, that’s a situation where indigenous people have seen over time encroachment on to their land and they’ve lost vast territories and there have been clear instances of broken treaty promises. It’s undisputed that the Black Hills was guaranteed them by treaty and that treaty was just outright violated by the United States in the 1900s. That has been recognised by the United States supreme court,” he said.

Anaya said he would reserve detailed recommendations on a plan for land restoration until he presents his final report to the UN human rights council in September.

“I’m talking about restoring to indigenous peoples what obviously they’re entitled to and they have a legitimate claim to in a way that is not devisive but restorative. That’s the idea behind reconciliation,” he said.

But any such proposal is likely to meet stiff resistance in Congress similar to that which has previously greeted calls for the US government to pay reparations for slavery to African-American communities.

Anaya said he had received “exemplary cooperation” from the Obama administration but he declined to speculate on why no members of Congress would meet him.

“I typically meet with members of the national legislature on my country visits and I don’t know the reason,” he said.

Last month, the US justice and interior departments announced a $1 billion settlement over nearly 56 million acres of Indian land held in trust by Washington but exploited by commercial interests for timber, farming, mining and other uses with little benefit to the tribes.

The attorney general, Eric Holder, said the settlement “fairly and honourably resolves historical grievances over the accounting and management of tribal trust funds, trust lands and other non-monetary trust resources that, for far too long, have been a source of conflict between Indian tribes and the United States.”

But Anaya said that was only a step in the right direction.

“These are important steps but we’re talking about mismanagement by the government of assets that were left to indigenous peoples,” he said. “This money for the insults on top of the injury. It’s not money for the initial problem itself, which is the taking of vast territories. This is very important and I think the administration should be commended for moving forward to settle these claims but there are these deeper issues that need to be addressed.”

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2012/may/04/us-stolen-land-indian-tribes-un?CMP=share_btn_fb

Native American Tribes Declare Sovereignty, Break Away from State of Maine


Source: Alex Freeman

(TFC) Augusta, ME — Due to Governor Paul LePage launching direct political and environmental attacks against the Penobscot, Micmac and Passamaquoddy tribes of Maine, leaders of those tribes have recalled their representatives from the state legislature and are asserting their sovereignty from the State of Maine. “The Maine Indian Land claims Settlement act has failed and we cannot allow ourselves to continue down the path,” Chief Francis said. “We’re saying it’s a failed social experiment.”

In August of 2011, Governor LePage signed an Executive Order recognizing a “special relationship” between the sovereign State of Maine, and the sovereign tribes within the State. In this order, the Governor instructed all State agencies to include a tribal liaison, whose role would be to facilitate communication and direct policy in all areas of State jurisdiction in such a way as to include the voice and interest of native peoples. The Order instructs that “the State and Tribes should work together as one,” and Tribal interests should be heeded when developing policies and procedures “on matters that significantly or uniquely affect those tribes.”

In April of this year, LePage rescinded that Order. The new Order maintains that native tribes in Maine retain their sovereignty, but holds that they now have a “relationship between equals with its own set of responsibilities,” yet declares that tribal lands, forms of tribal governance and natural resources controlled by the native tribes are subject to the laws and jurisdiction of the State of Maine. The takeover of lands was prompted by an EPA letter to the State, and claims that lack of Tribal participation in “the State’s interests” required the usurpation of Tribal sovereignty. The Letter, in fact, actually supports the Tribal position, as the Tribal standards of environmental protection are much stricter than those of the EPA or the State of Maine. Those close to the Penobscot Tribe tellThe Fifth Column that LePage threatened to sue the EPA over the proposed new regulations, leading the Agency to back down.  LePage’s Order, then, becomes a direct political attack against the Tribes in affront to their sovereignty and an effort to exact more control over the land by the State of Maine.

Even though Penobscot Chief Kirk Francis and his Tribe couldn’t have been“happier” with the EPA ruling, the State of Maine blamed the Tribe for poor water quality and dissolved its sovereignty over the land and resources. This comes in spite of a Penobscot lawsuit over fishing rights in the Penobscot River and another legal battle between the State and the Passamaquoddy Tribe over rights in other fisheries in the region, as well as Maine’s already stringent water quality standards. Initially “a little bit — well, a lot — confused” by the new Executive Order, Chief Francis declared, “We have gotten on our knees for the last time, from here on out, we are a self-governing organization, focused on a self-determining path.”

Francis spoke outside of the Maine Statehouse on May 26 in a rally celebrating the severing of diplomatic ties between the Tribes and the State. He was joined by leaders of the Passamaquoddy Tribe, but not the Houlton and Maliseet Tribes, who cite too much of a vested financial interest in the outcome of several bills currently pending.  Matthew Dana II and Wayne Mitchell, just prior to the rally, issued statements on the floor of the legislature announcing the separation, and abandoning their pro forma seats in the state government. Each Tribe was allotted one seat in the legislature, where they were allowed to submit and discuss bills, but denied the right to vote.  According to the Tribes, this is the first time since 1842 that a Native Tribe was not present in the legislature.

Passamaquoddy Representative, Matthew Dana II (right) stands by as Chief Fred Moore (left) explains the Tribe’s position. Photo Courtesy Sherri Mitchell, Native News Online

Passamaquoddy Representative, Matthew Dana II (right) stands by as Chief Fred Moore (left) explains the Tribe’s position. Photo Courtesy Sherri Mitchell, Native News Online

“We have gone to great lengths to demonstrate good faith and cooperation, only to be lied to,”states Passamaquoddy Chief Fred Moore. Meanwhile, LePage maintains in one breath that it is the interests of the State of Maine that have not been respected, yet in another breath has stated that he would veto any Tribal bill that reaches his desk from the legislature. Urged to rejoin the legislature by Speaker Mark Eves, former Representative Mitchell of the Penobscot Nation toldsupporters that the decision to leave non-voting positions in the legislature had been made, and that any return would “be on our own terms.” In the meantime, any interaction between the Tribes and the State of Maine will take place as separate and equal nations, not colonialized subservients to an occupying government that repeatedly refuses to respect Tribal interests.

The unique break in diplomatic ties signals the reassertion of full sovereignty for the Tribal Nations. The precedent and political implications could spread to other tribes throughout North America, and serve as a model for natives and non-natives alike as state and federal governments continue to enact laws violating the rights of the People, and others to protect the environmentally and economically destructive interests of corporations. The reassertion of sovereignty, more immediately, may protect much of the land and water in Maine from fracking, Tar Sands production, and mountain top mining.  More importantly, the Tribes are declaring that they no longer consent to the State to “define our sovereignty or culture or to interfere with our self-governing rights.”

http://www.blacklistednews.com/Native_American_Tribes_Declare_Sovereignty%2C_Break_Away_from_State_of_Maine/44269/0/38/38/Y/M.html

Michael Tellinger and Hope Girl ~ UBUNTU Contributionism and Free Energy


FTW Michael Tellinger Show Logo

UBUNTU is working! This is what ten years of philosophy and six months of physical labor look like when a real solution births its way into our physical world!

UBUNTU Contributionism is a model for a new social structure and global movement founded by scientist, explorer, and internationally acclaimed author Michael Tellinger.  Earlier this year, after six months of back breaking work, the first UBUNTU model community became  a reality in Michael’s small home town of Waterval Boven South Africa.  A vandalized building abandoned by the government has been reclaimed and renovated by the people of the town to become the Community Town Hall.  The new space will be utilized for a wide array of needed purposes including a movie theatre, school, community gym, and meal hall. The accomplishment of this feat acts as a real kick off to the many projects that will continuously develop as a living breathing model for the first operating UBUNTU community.

This interview is very near and dear to my heart. I learned about Michael and his amazing work a few years ago, and his research played a huge role both in my awakening process out of corporate America, and in the formation of the Fix the World Organization.  Fix the World and UBUNTU Contributionism share a lot of parallels in our foundational philosophy. Michael’s work has always been a huge inspiration to me personally, and in many ways has set a real example for all of us.

In this interview, I have a chance to speak with Michael about two topics that I am very passionate about; community and free energy.  Michael has completed the first portion of hard work in getting their community hall up and operating.  We compare notes on both of our experiences and reveal what it’s really like to run projects like this. We also touch on the world of alternative/free energy, and Michael presents an incredible solution that shows how free energy can unite a community instead of divide a community.

WATCH THE INTERVIEW HERE ON FIX THE WORLD TV:

player

 

Highlights from the Interview:

Working with Volunteers
While there were some amazing volunteers that came from all over the world and helped in a big way, there were also a lot of volunteers that came and caused a lot of damage.  Managing volunteers is a full time job and many lessons were learned on how to improve the experience in the future. This involves doing a lot of foundational work to get the projects started, and then having an organized set of specific tasks for volunteers to do with a designated volunteer coordinator to help manage the people.

Michael speaks about how opening up your project  to volunteers also opens you, your home and your life to infiltrators that come in under the guise of “volunteers” and who are there solely to undermine your project.  This is a common problem in this type of work, and we at FTW have had the same types of experiences.  Valuable lessons about this topic are shared in this interview for the many groups that are undertaking similar projects.

Alternative Energy
Michael like many others has been following the QEG project and we were able to give him a private demonstration of our QEG over skype.  This sparked a conversation about the experiences that Michael has had in the “free energy world” working with many inventors and taking part in various conferences around the globe.   In this interview, I asked how UBUNTU Contributionism would apply to building a free or alternative energy device.  Michael then laid out an amazing philosophy:

“This is where my philosophy and the current UBUNTU Contributionism philosophy on alternative energy devices is very different from most other people.

I oppose the creation of a small energy device that can be used by people in their individual homes. That is not my intention. I have come to the conclusion that the global collective consciousness is not ready to embrace that. It might sound really arrogant to people, but let me explain why I say that.

If tomorrow, some factory started manufacturing a 20 KW machine that anyone could buy off the shelf, you’ve got a serious problem. Because you clearly aren’t going to sell it cheap, so those that can afford it will buy it, and they’ll be ok in their own home. While the people that can’t afford it will be even poorer and there will be a bigger gap between the “haves” and the “have-nots”.  This is not a solution.

I am a strong proponent of a different approach. I believe that we need to create an energy device that is owned by the community. Whether it’s a bunch of smaller devices strung together, or one big device that runs a megawatt or more. This device should belong to the community so that everyone can get free electricity.

The community works together to collectively put the funds together to install that technology. Whether it’s something put into the river, or new exotic technology, or the QEG… whatever it is that the people can get their free electricity from.

This is what we are now promoting through our election campaigns for next years’ local municipal elections. We are promoting the fact that we are going to give our four towns free electricity, not by weird fancy technology, but by simply putting hydro turbines into the rivers in each and every town. And then we the people pay to install it, we run it and manage it, and it’s our electricity. Everybody gets free electricity, everybody benefits equally. In return for that free electricity, everybody has to contribute their three hours a week towards one of the community projects.

So you use the electricity to unite the people and not to divide the people. Now you are creating a community of abundance beyond your wildest imagination.   Everyone is happy, they have free electricity, and they can do things they couldn’t do before. They don’t have to be cold in winter and hot in summer. They can cook, they can read and study at night, they can do what they want and they love you for this.  They feel like they are part of the community because they are no longer marginalized and everyone is equal on that front.

And now you also have a labor force from the people that benefit from that electricity. In our town that would be about 3,000 people. So suddenly you’ve got 9,000 hours of labor a week. Just do the math. The amount of stuff you will create for your community is unimaginable! More food than we can eat, more clean water, more clothing, more wooden products, more metal things that we need. The roads will be clean, the parks will be spectacular. Not only that, then the money that comes in from the community projects belongs to the community. And everything that you create in those community projects, the food the bread etc., is free to everyone that participates.

So what this electricity device does, it really becomes the foundation in a society of people that can live virtually for free.”

(For those following the QEG project, FTW has been working towards implementing a similar philosophy through our Cottage Industry Community Units model, working with the local people in our community, and supporting communities that are crowdfunding to build a community QEG.)

UBUNTU For Local Elections:

UBUNTU  contested in the national elections in South Africa in 2014, in the UK elections in May of 2015 and is planting the seeds to contest in the local elections  in South Africa and also in Canada in 2016.

UBUNTU has a very good chance of winning the local elections in their municipality. This is a critical milestone that once reached can become a domino effect to influence other communities to apply UBUNTU principles and change our world for the better.   You can support the movement by visiting their site and subscribing with a monthly donation amount to help fund their efforts.  http://www.UBUNTUparty.org.za/

 

About UBUNTU:

The principles of UBUNTU Contributionism are outlined by its founder, Michael Tellinger, in dozens of documents, video and audio recordings and the book entitled UBUNTU Contributionism – A Blueprint For Human Prosperity, which has now become the founding document for the UBUNTU Movement globally. Anyone that has not read the book cannot claim to represent, or speak on behalf of, or claim to know the principles of Contributionism. While the circumstances of every community are unique, the foundation of Contributionism remains the same. We are moving to a world without money, barter or trade of any kind – where everyone’s contributions are respected equally and where everyone is given the freedom to contribute their natural talents or acquired skills for the greatest benefit of all in their community. We are developing a society where people work together in cooperation, rather than in competition against each other.

We are not creating self-sustained communities – we are creating much more – we are creating communities of abundance – where everyone has everything they need beyond our wildest imagination.

Visit The UBUNTU Websites:

http://www.UBUNTUparty.org.za/
http://www.UBUNTUplanet.org/


Purchase Michael’s Books on Amazon:

Temples of the African Gods
Slave Species of the Gods
Adams Calendar
UBUNTU Contributionism


REGISTER FOR MICHAEL’S WORKSHOP ON MAY 16TH!

Join Michael Tellinger for an intensive interactive on-line workshop and Q&A on May 16th Michael will be sharing crucial information about UBUNTU and Contributionism philosophy; experiences from the first year of launching the community projects; alternative energy; UBUNTU UK & UK Elections; what we have learnt in the past year – other topics and questions from the participants.

Join us for this historic event to lay the seeds of consciousness across the planet. Tickets are $12 and you can register here: www.PortalTOAscension.org

11053353_919843934740494_4397939916186300669_n
http://fixtheworld.podbean.com/e/michael-tellinger-and-hope-girl-ubuntu-contributionism-and-free-energy/

If A Song Could Heal The Soul – Nahko Bear (Medicine For The People) “Aloha Ke Akua”


 

nahko-photos

If there was ever an artist that has been overlooked and undiscovered then this is him … his music is like medicine for the soul.

The video has breathtaking visuals to go with the beautiful music and healing words of Nahko Bear.

Listen and Enjoy

The words, “Aloha ke akua” mean the breath of life and the love of God – that’s a loose translation. I believe (and so do Hawaiians), that when you speak this language with intention it has mana or BIG power to it.

If you wish to find out more about Nahko Bear you can read an interview he had with Malcolm Harris of Huffington Post here.

Source: http://educateinspirechange.org

http://www.thelifeisamazing.com/nahko-bear-medicine-for-the-people-if-a-song-could-heal-the-soul/

VIDEO: Ku’e Petition Comes To Mauna Kea


To learn more on Hawaii’s hidden history and Kanaka Maoli’s fight to restore the Hawaiian Kingdom see: www.Manaoha.org

MAY 3, 2015: Ku’e Petition comes to Mauna Kea. Video by David Corrigan, voice of Sherry Bracken

MAUNA KEA – On Sunday, supporters of the Mauna Kea Hui and the Ku Kia’i Mauna movement drew a visual connection between the current fight against the Thirty Meter Telescope and their long sovereignty struggle.

At Pu’u Huluhulu – at the base of the Mauna Kea Access Road – many gathered to pay homage to the kupuna who first took a stand as far back as 1897. Hundreds of names written on small signs were dispersed around the grounds. The names are the ancestors who first stood against annexation by signing the Ku’e Petitions. Over 21,000 adult native Hawaiians joined the effort. Their names were gathered from across Hawaii, by foot, boat, and by horseback. The petitions were hand-carried to Washington and delivered to the United States Senate. The petition convinced congress not to sign a treaty of annexation between the U.S. and the Republic of Hawaii, which took over after the overthrow of Queen Liliuokalani on January 17, 1893.

In July 1898 – during the Spanish-American War – The Republic of Hawaii was annexed under the Newlands Resolution, a joint resolution of congress. To this day, many Hawaiians insist that the Newlands Resolution is no substitute for a legal treaty of annexation, and therefor Hawaii is under a prolonged occupation by the United States. The question over who has the legal right to lease lands – especially the crown lands of Mauna Kea – is one of the driving factors in today’s opposition to the TMT project.

We interviewed political scientists Dr. Keanu Sai a few weeks ago on the subject.

The Ku’e Petition was nearly lost to history; the population has only recently become educated about this chapter in Hawaii’s history.

On Sunday, gathering in tents by the ahu along Saddle Road, families of the Ku’e petitioners consulted with the records and looked for the names of their kupuna within documents. Later, in the cold mist and rain, the hundreds of names were placed in the lava field. Some – by coincidence – stumbled upon the names of their ancestors as they worked… an emotional moment for many, young and old.

The names of the Ku'e Petitioners on display at Pu'u Huluhulu.

http://www.bigislandvideonews.com/2015/05/04/video-kue-petition-comes-to-mauna-kea/#sthash.BuuurnuQ.dpuf

Testimony on Mauna Kea UH Board of Regents, Part 2


April 26, 2015 testimony to the University of Hawaii Board of Regents part 2

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San Diego Free Press: Protecting Mauna Kea – History for Haoles by Hawaiian Kingdom


willfalk
Will Faulk, a journalist for the San Diego Free Press, has consented to the reprint of his article that was published online today April 29, 2015.
In the first essay of my Protecting Mauna Kea series, I made a mistake. I wrongfully described the ongoing, illegal American occupation of Hawai’i as an “annexation.”
San Diego FP-Lili‘uokalani
Hawaiian friends of mine pointed this out to me and gave me a thorough history lesson. I was referred to documents, books, and websites that tell the truth. For the last several days, I’ve been reading everything I can on the subject.
The more I read, the more convinced I become not only that the Thirty Meter Telescope project lacks any legal right to build on Mauna Kea, but that international law, indeed American law itself, demands that the United States end it’s occupation of Hawai’i.
I have two hopes for this piece. First, I want to give a history lesson for haoles. “Haole” is the Hawaiian word for white person. I am specifically directing this lesson at white settlers – at haoles – because the first thing haoles can do is understand the history of violence we benefit from.
This history lesson will demonstrate that the current regime controlling Hawai’i is illegitimate and as such has no authority to enforce the construction of the TMT on Mauna Kea.
Second, I want to relieve Hawaiians from the responsibility of educating haoles. Hawaiians have no responsibility to educate us. As a white settler hoping to stand in true solidarity with Hawaiians, I am upset with myself for the mistake. I have seen how frustrating it can be for a movement when valuable time must be spent coaching well-meaning settlers along.
I want to be clear: I am not advocating for a “call-out” culture on the front lines of resistance where resisters perpetually attack each other for their choice of words. Many of us must go through our personal experiences unlearning the lies we are taught and this takes time. The dominant culture, of course, does an excellent job lying. That’s why it’s the dominant culture.
But, I am saying that settlers need to take responsibility for educating other settlers. Leaving education to oppressed classes, forcing them to do the work of spreading consciousness, is a form of oppression in itself.
Before I begin, it is necessary to explain that this essay represents my opinions and my personal perspective of Hawaiian history stemming from the research I’ve done and been directed to. I am not a spokesperson for the Hawaiian people, neither am I spokesperson for the Mauna Kea protectors. I understand that there is no One True History, but I refuse to abide by the relativism I see perpetuating around me.
The complexity of a situation does not signify a lack of meaning. Rather, the complexity of a situation – especially ones with real, physical consequences – demands that we grapple with information to take a stand. As the world disintegrates before our eyes, I see too many people mired in the neutrality their belief in the relative nature of reality produces.
Make no mistake, if the construction of the TMT project results in the spill of hazardous chemicals in the largest freshwater aquifer on the Island of Hawai’i – a very real possibility – there will be very real consequences for life on the Island.
***
Milan Kundera famously stated the “struggle against oppression is the struggle of memory against forgetting.” I have found this to be shockingly true learning the history of Hawai’i. It is my belief that haoles have forgotten – or never knew – the history of Hawai’i. If we did not forget, there would be more of us supporting the Mauna Kea protectors and supporting true Hawaiian sovereignty.
What have we forgotten?
It starts centuries ago when Hawaiians first arrived in Hawai’i. Over the centuries, Hawaiians developed a culture based on ecological balance that included communal land tenure. I am very self-conscious that my attempts to explain a complex culture that existed for centuries before the arrival of Europeans would amount to so much generalization. I cannot possibly do the Hawaiian culture justice in a short essay, but so many discussions of Hawaiian history begin with the arrival of Captain Cook in 1778 erasing Hawaiian history pre-European contact.
There are always those that will accuse me of romanticizing Hawaiian culture, who will say “all human cultures are inherently destructive.” I do not mean to romanticize Hawaiian culture and it simply is not true that all human cultures are inherently destructive. We know the Hawaiian culture before 1778 had it’s own problems, but wide-scale ecological collapse was not one of them. In this era of total environmental destruction, we would do well to empower cultures who lived in balance with their land base.
From 1826 until 1893, the United States government recognized the independent Kingdom of Hawai’i including full, complete diplomatic relations with the Hawaiian government. For all intents and purposes, the United States viewed Hawai’i as a nation just like Mexico, Canada, or Great Britain. In fact, the United States entered into treaties involving navigation and commerce with Hawai’i in 1826, 1842, 1849, 1875, and 1887.
San Diego FP-1886 Legislature
Then, in January, 1893, John L. Stevens, an American agent in Hawaii (his official title was United States Minister), conspired with non-Hawaiians and members of the U.S. Navy to overthrow the Hawaiian government. On January 16, 1893, Stevens and armed US naval personnel invaded Hawai’i and positioned themselves next to Hawaiian governmental buildings including Iolani Palace to intimidate Queen Liliuokalani. Queen Liliuokalani, under threats of bloodshed, yielded her authority to the government of the United States – NOT Stevens’ provisional government – until the time the United States would undo the actions of its representatives in Hawai’i.
Grover Cleveland was the president in 1893 and he initiated an investigation into the actions of Stevens and his cronies while calling for the restoration of the Hawaiian monarchy. The investigation concluded that Stevens and other US officials in Hawaii had abused their authority and had engaged in “an act of war.”
Still, the provisional government sought annexation in Congress, but was unable to rally the support of 2/3 of the Senate needed for annexation. So, on July 4, 1894, the provisional government that had forcibly invaded and overthrown the Kingdom of Hawai’i, declared itself the Republic of Hawai’i.
In 1896, William McKinley replaced Grover Cleveland as president. Using the excuse of the Spanish-American war and the need for a naval base in the Pacific, McKinley and the Senate began to entertain the notion of annexing Hawai’i, again.
In 1897, the Hawaiian people delivered a massive petition where nearly 90% of Hawaiians alive at the time declared their desire not to become part of the United States of America. Unable to secure a treaty of annexation, Congress passed a joint resolution titled “the Newlands Resolution” on July 7, 1898.
The illegality of this joint resolution is one of the most important things to understand about Hawaiian history. This resolution had no legal basis, had no validity, and was possible simply because of the armed might of the United States.
The resolution has no legitimate basis because laws passed by Congress have no authority internationally. Congress can only pass laws that apply within the United States.
Hawaiian legal scholar Dr. Keanu Sai explains it better than I can in his blog-article “International Law Prevents Construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope” when he writes, “The underlying problem that Congressmen at the time knew was that no law of Congress can have any force and effect beyond the borders of the United States. In other words, the United States could no more annex the Hawaiian Islands by passing a domestic law, than it could annex Canada today by passing a law.”
As part of the Newlands Resolution, the Republic of Hawai’i passed 1,800,000 acres of what had been crown, government, and public lands of the Kingdom of Hawai’i to the control of the United States. Included in this land is Mauna Kea. Through the acquisition of Mauna Kea in this way, the State of Hawai’i has leased land on Mauna Kea for the TMT’s construction. But, an illegal state giving land acquired illegally can only give – you guessed it – an illegal lease.
Of course, you don’t have to take my word for this history, because all of these facts were already admitted and apologized for by Congress on November 23, 1993. You can read their apology here.
***
So, can you see why we cannot call the occupation of Hawai’i an annexation? No treaty of annexation was ever signed. “Annexation” implies consent on the part of those annexed and clearly the Hawaiian people never consented.
To take this even deeper, the term “annexation” hides the truth, softens the reality that Hawai’i was invaded while the invaders still seek to assert dominance over Hawai’i. To use the term “annexation” is to forget and forgetting clears the wayfor oppression.
There’s something, though, that bothers me about all this. How can the American government and the American people after learning this history, after admitting the wrongs done to Hawai’i still allow something like the TMT project to happen? I think the answer is that learning the history is only the first small step. Knowing the history, we must act.
One of the intentions behind my writing is to try to understand how so many people can recognize problems in the world and then fail to act to solve those problems. I am a haole, so I can only speak as a haole, and I believe too many haoles settle for pointing out their privilege while the more important work involves undermining the forces that grants them that privilege over others in the first place. The history is clear. Hawaiians are being wronged. Now, we need to act.

“BEST EVER” Little Grandmother Keisha Crowther performance, with important Message from the Tribal Elders “Earth and Beyond 2014″


Note: I’ve been watching Keisha’s message evolve over the last 4yrs., from my perspective this is by far her most powerful presentation to date….enjoy! Blessings, {~A~}

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Little Grandmother Keisha Crowther performance Earth and Beyond conference, 21th of June, 2014, Jaarbeurs Utrecht, Netherlands. More information about Little Grandmother Keisha Crowther, go to: http://www.littlegrandmother.net. More info about Earth and Beyond, go to: http://www.earthandbeyond.nl. For our HealingSoundMovement (music/events/Radio/Tv), go to: http://www.healingsoundmovement.com and http://tv.healingsoundmovement.com/ And for our Centrum Zonnewijzer (international events and more), go to: http://www.centrumzonnewijzer.nl.

Kanaka Express: Interview with Dr. Keanu Sai on Washington Times’ Story on China and the Hawaiian Kingdom


In this interview with host Kale Gumapac, Dr. Keanu Sai provides comment on his recent trip to Switzerland regarding war crimes and the recent newspaper story published in the Washington Free Beacon and the Washington Times titled “Hawaiian Independence Movement Attracts Chinese Interest: Restoration of kingdom could end U.S. military presence” on February 10, 2015.

Graham Hancock Editorial: A Small Religious Sect Is Being Butchered In Iraq And Now Faces Total Disaster


Note: This newsworthy story was found on Graham Hancocks FB page, the following is his editorial on this tragic situation unfolding in northern Iraq. The Yazidi’s of Northern Iraq are facing a barbaric genocide in the war torn region. Quoting from the story below:

“In an impassioned speech Tuesday, Vian Dakheel, a Yazidi member of the Iraqi parliament, took things a step further. Collapsing in tears, she directly said her people were facing “genocide” and would be “butchered” unless ISIS were stopped.”

Here’s the link to the heartbreaking video of Vian’s pleas to Parliament, to add insult to injury watch “male” Parliament members stand by “stone faced” as she cries for help. Hardly one member gave her the dignity of eye contact, the only support came from her own people.

As we seek a unified world, people appear in many parts of the world seem to  be moving further and further apart, each remaining within their own factions and closed off, offering little room for compromise between opposing party’s.

Wishing I had better solutions to offer aside from “please share freely”, but all we can do is spread information like this far and wide in an attempt to reach the sleeping masses for their wake-up call.

Much love and aloha,  Annette

From Graham Hancock:

What the militant Islamic death cult that calls itself “ISIS” is threatening the minority Yazidis of Iraq with is a moral outrage — horrible, disgusting and utterly wrong: http://read.bi/1kLpgrv. See also here: http://bit.ly/1qYFYpZ . The Yazidis practise an ancient dualistic form of spirituality with links to Zoroastrianism and Gnosticism. Though they are by no means perfect — who is? — they are believers in reincarnation (which they describe as the soul “changing its clothes”) and keep alive in the modern world the flame of an ancient mystery. It is utterly appalling and tragic that they should be left without protection in Iraq. Just as many in the West have spoken out in support of the Palestinians of Gaza and protested the persecution that has been inflicted upon them by the State of Israel, so too we cannot simply stand by silent while the Yazidi minority faces genocide at the hands of fanatical Islamists.

Let me, while saying this, make my position clear regarding that monstrous entity that Christians, Muslims and Jews all call “God” — the entity variously known as Yahweh, Jehovah, Allah and other names, who was the god of Abraham and whose worship has filtered down to give shape to the three powerful and closely related monotheistic faiths that we call Christianity, Judaism and Islam today. This entity, whether he is in some sense real or whether he is merely a projection of the imaginations of those who worship “Him” has been responsible down the ages for unbelievable amounts of horror and bloodshed —

e.g. the Jewish conquest of “the Promised Land” (which still continues today in the form of illegal Israeli settlements that are justified in the minds of many by the notion that “God” “gave” all of this land to the Jews, regardless of who has actually been living on it for the past two thousand years);

e.g. Christian persecution and Holy Wars (such as the Crusades) against other forms of spirituality, not to speak of the horrific practice of burning heretics and witches at the stake which Christianity was so addicted to until as late as the eighteenth century. It is noteworthy that the chaos in Iraq today stems directly from the destabilisation that followed the 2003 invasion by Western powers. President George W. Bush spoke of this invasion more than once as a “Crusade”, and Britain’s then prime minister Tony Blair also saw the sending of British troops to Iraq as part of a “Christian battle” (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/…/Tony-Blair-believed-God-wanted…).

and e.g. the hideous practice of stoning women to death for adultery, and all the other grotesque abuses of humanity and acts of vile cruelty and intolerance carried out by “ISIS” in the name of Islam (http://america.aljazeera.com/…/18/islamic-state-stoning.html).

The Gnostics, whose spiritual system finds some faint reflections amongst the persecuted Yazidis, saw the god of Abraham, worshiped today by Islamists, Christians and Jews, as the “demiurge” — not a true god at all but a murderous, puffed up, egotistical, jealous, cruel, bullying, arrogant minor supernatural who sought always to crush the divine spark in humanity and prevent us from ever awakening to our true spiritual identity. Evidently the demiurge is still as active as he ever was. It is ironic that fanatical Islamists who bully and murder in his name have adopted the acronym ISIS, which stands for “The Islamic State of Iraq and Syria” (or, variously, the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham, or the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant). The irony in this — and the travesty — arises because the goddess Isis was one of the great aeons of the ancient Egyptian pantheon, the friend of slaves, sinners, artisans and the downtrodden, the ideal mother and wife, and the patroness of children, nature and magic.

If humanity is to progress, if we are to find ourselves again, if we are to remember that we are all sisters and brothers, if we are to recognise the spark of true divinity within ourselves, then now more than ever before it is essential that we get “god” out of the equation and leave far behind us the demiurge and his archons — those evil angels envisaged in the gnostic cosmology as disguising themselves as men and mingling with us, driving us to all manner of crimes hostile to the nature of the soul.

 

A Small Religious Sect Is Being Butchered In Iraq And Now Faces Total Disaster

AP60344188843APThis image was made from video taken on Sunday shows Iraqis from the Yazidi community arriving in Irbil in northern Iraq after Islamic militants attacked the towns of Sinjar and Zunmar.

As the militant group called Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIS) battles Iraqi government and Kurdish forces for supremacy of Iraq, the relatively tiny Yazidi community has been left stranded in a humanitarian crisis amid talk of “genocide” against them.

As many as 40,000 civilians, many of whom are Yazidi, are currently trapped on the barren top of Mount Sinjar, humanitarian agencies told The Washington Post on Tuesday. There, the civilians face a grim choice between engaging the ISIS army and starvation or dehydration if they remain.

“There are children dying on the mountain, on the roads,” Marzio Babille, the Iraq representative for the United Nations Children’s Fund, told The Post. “There is no water, there is no vegetation; they are completely cut off and surrounded by Islamic State. It’s a disaster, a total disaster.”

Prince Tahseen Said, “the world leader of the Yazidis,” and other Yazidi leaders have been left begging for help from world leaders.

“I ask for aid and to lend a hand and help the people of Sinjar areas and its affiliates and villages and complexes which are home to the people of the Yazidi religion. I invite [you] to assume [your] humanitarian and nationalistic responsibilities towards them and help them in their plight and the difficult conditions in which they live today,” Said wrote in an appeal to the region’s leaders, as well as Europe, the U.N., and the U.S., according to The New Yorker.

In an impassioned speech Tuesday, Vian Dakheel, a Yazidi member of the Iraqi parliament, took things a step further. Collapsing in tears, she directly said her people were facing “genocide” and would be “butchered” unless ISIS were stopped.

“As we speak there is genocide taking place against the Yazidis,” Dakheel said, according to Bloomberg News. “My people are being slaughtered!”

“Devil Worshippers” Persecuted for Centuries

sinjai Wikimedia Commons/SkitchThe Sinjar section of the Nineveh Province in northern Iraq.

There are only perhaps 200,000 to 300,000 Yazidis worldwide, according to the Encyclopædia Iranica, a collaborative academic project based at Columbia University, and they are overwhelmingly concentrated in northern Iraq. Less than 5,000 Yazidis are in the U.S., the encyclopedia said.

Because of their unique religious practices, which have led to them being called one of “the region’s most enigmatic religious sects,” they are accused by some Muslims and Christians of being “devil worshippers.” However, Encyclopædia Iranica described that label as “erroneous.”

“In the Yazidi worldview, God created the world, which is now in the care of a Heptad of seven Holy Beings, often known as ‘Angels,'” the project said. “Pre-eminent among these is Ṭāʾus-ē Malak or Malak Ṭāʾus, the Peacock Angel, who is equated with Satan by outsiders. Most Yazidis find this identification highly offensive.”

This misunderstanding is partially due to the “Malak Ṭāʾus” figure’s other name, which is similar to the Koran’s word for “Satan,” according to LookLex, another encyclopedia focused on the Middle East region.

“The reason for the Yazidis’ reputation of being devil worshipers is connected to the other name of Malak Ta’us, Shaytan, the same name as the Koran’s for Satan,” the encyclopedia said.

These accusations of devil worship, combined with the powder keg of religious tension in the region, have left the small community of Yazidis in a vulnerable position. ISIS has a particularly brutal policy toward such religious minorities, Theodore Karasik, director of research at the Institute for Near East and Gulf Military Analysis, told Bloomberg.

“[The militant policy of] either convert or be killed is a very powerful message,” Karasik said. “This group is going to be creating more refugee flows as it moves in different directions within the multi-ethnic structure of Iraq.”

But persecution of the Yazidis goes back centuries. As the Christian Science Monitor noted, the Ottoman Empire is said to have slaughtered hundreds of Yazidis. In the modern era, when the nearby Kurds, Sunnis, and Shiites are engaged in violent conflict after the U.S. largely withdrew its military from Iraq, things have only grown worse for the sect.

“Everyone considers us infidels,” Samir Babasheikh, whose father is the Yazidis’ spiritual leader, told The New York Times. “Sunnis and Shiites are killing each other even though they are both Muslims, so imagine what they will do to us, people from a completely different religion.”

Schooling the World: The White Mans Last Burden


If you wanted to change an ancient culture in a generation, how would you do it?

You would change the way it educates its children.

The U.S. Government knew this in the 19th century when it forced Native American children into government boarding schools. Today, volunteers build schools in traditional societies around the world, convinced that school is the only way to a ‘better’ life for indigenous children.

But is this true? What really happens when we replace a traditional culture’s way of learning and understanding the world with our own? SCHOOLING THE WORLD takes a challenging, sometimes funny, ultimately deeply disturbing look at the effects of modern education on the world’s last sustainable indigenous cultures.

Beautifully shot on location in the Buddhist culture of Ladakh in the northern Indian Himalayas, the film weaves the voices of Ladakhi people through a conversation between four carefully chosen original thinkers; anthropologist and ethnobotanist Wade Davis, a National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence; Helena Norberg-Hodge and Vandana Shiva, both recipients of the Right Livelihood Award for their work with traditional peoples in India; and Manish Jain, a former architect of education programs with UNESCO, USAID, and the World Bank.

The film examines the hidden assumption of cultural superiority behind education aid projects, which overtly aim to help children “escape” to a “better life” — despite mounting evidence of the environmental, social, and mental health costs of our own modern consumer lifestyles, from epidemic rates of childhood depression and substance abuse to pollution and climate change.

It looks at the failure of institutional education to deliver on its promise of a way out of poverty — here in the United States as well as in the so-called “developing” world.

And it questions our very definitions of wealth and poverty — and of knowledge and ignorance — as it uncovers the role of schools in the destruction of traditional sustainable agricultural and ecological knowledge, in the breakup of extended families and communities, and in the devaluation of elders and ancient spiritual traditions.

Finally, SCHOOLING THE WORLD calls for a “deeper dialogue” between cultures, suggesting that we have at least as much to learn as we have to teach, and that these ancient sustainable societies may harbor knowledge which is vital for our own survival in the coming millennia.

LOST PEOPLE FILMS presents SCHOOLING THE WORLD: THE WHITE MAN’S LAST BURDEN / photography JIM HURST and BEN KNIGHT / sound recording JIM HURST /
produced by NEAL MARLENS, JIM HURST, and MARK GROSSAN / directed and edited by CAROL BLACK / featuring WADE DAVIS, HELENA NORBERG-HODGE, VANDANA SHIVA, MANISH JAIN, & DOLMA TSERING / 65 minutes

Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XLSIgZWNR9M&list=PLp6hi_knJakcvtdLvdx3hFxb8sT3hpCkL
copyleft 2010 – lost people films – WWW.SCHOOLINGTHEWORLD.ORG

Global Alliance for the “Rights of Nature and Tribunal” Story


The story of the Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature and the Ethics More at http://therightsofnature.org/ga-ron-v…

Learn about the origins of the Rights of Nature movement as Ecuador becomes the first country to include Rights of Nature in its Constitution and communities across the United States adopt Rights of Nature and assert their community rights. Travel to Cochabamba, Bolivia for the creation and proclamation of the Universal Declaration for the Rights of Mother Earth. Experience the 2014 Global Rights of Nature Summit and the launch of the first Permanent Rights of Nature Ethics Tribunal.

Thank you to Siegmund Thies and Norie Huddle for producing this video in both English and Spanish! Siegmund and Norie have been documenting the history of Rights of Nature in Ecuador and the Peoples Conference on Climate Change and Rights of Mother Earth in Bolivia, April 2010. Norie and her husband Richard brought forth the first Rights of Nature case in Ecuador and won on behalf of the Vilcabamba River.

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