The Truth About Thanksgiving: Brainwashing of the American History Textbook


Note: This post is dedicated to keeping the memory alive of the First Nations Peoples who made the America’s great long, long ago. With love and reverence to the original Ancestors of the Continents of the America’s. Blessings, {~A~}

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Those who are indigenous to this land we call “The United States of America” have been long misrepresented and pushed out of American history textbooks in favor of glorifying those who now rule this nation and represent the dominant culture. What kind of democracy are we when education institutions and teachers refuse to mention the fact that 10 to 30 million Natives were killed at the hands of European invasion and colonialism? What is the point of having a “free market of ideas” when selective and biased history is being taught to our children?

There is no other way to put it, but erasing the memory of an entire race of people through distorted history is a systematic way of deceiving and lying to our children. Not only are we presented with biased history, but we are also subjected to an ever-growing culture of capitalism, in which commercialization of an ambiguous holiday merely pulls us away from facts and meaning. Turkeys are associated with “Thanksgiving” in the same way Santa Clause and the Easter bunny have become synonymous with Christmas and Easter, respectively. Through the guise of innocence, capitalism is constantly telling us to consume because consumption equals “happiness.” Tomorrow is not “Black Friday” for nothing.

And as children dress up as Pilgrims and Natives to reenact the romanticized version of history, they are not only perpetuating stereotypes, but more importantly, they’re being embedded with lies. What do they really know about the Pilgrims and the Natives? Consider a high school history textbook called “The American Tradition” which describes the scene quite succinctly:

After some exploring, the Pilgrims chose the land around Plymouth Harbor for their settlement. Unfortunately, they had arrived in December and were not prepared for the New England winter. However, they were aided by friendly Indians, who gave them food and showed them how to grow corn. When warm weather came, the colonists planted, fished, hunted, and prepared themselves for the next winter. After harvesting their first crop, they and their Indian friends celebrated the first Thanksgiving.

This patronizing version of history excludes many embarrassing facts of European history. As stated by James W. Loewen, author of “Lies My Teacher Told Me,” many college students are unaware of the horrific plague that devastated and significantly reduced the population of Natives after Columbus’ arrival in the “new world.” Most diseases came from animals that were domesticated by Europeans. Cowpox from cows led to smallpox, which was later “spread through gifts of blankets by infected Europeans.” Of the twelve high school textbooks Professor Loewen studied and analyzed, only three offer some explanation that the plague was a factor of European colonization. The nine remaining textbooks mention almost nothing, and two of them omit the subject altogether. He writes: “Each of the other seven furnishes only a fragment of a paragraph that does not even make it into the index, let alone into students’ minds.”

Why is it important to mention the plague? It reinforced European ethnocentricism which hardly produced a “friendly” relationship between the Natives and Europeans. To most of the Pilgrims and Europeans, the Natives were heathens, savages, treacherous, and Satanic. Upon seeing thousands of dead Natives, the Governor of Massachusetts Bay Colony, John Winthrop, called the plague “miraculous.” In 1634, he wrote to a friend in England:

But for the natives in these parts, God hath so pursued them, as for 300 miles space the greatest part of them are swept away by the small pox which still continues among them. So as God hath thereby cleared our title to this place, those who remain in these parts, being in all not fifty, have put themselves under our protect…

The ugly truth is that many Pilgrims were thankful and grateful that the Native population was decreasing. Even worse, there was the Pequot Massacre in 1637, which started after the colonists found a murdered white man in his boat. Ninety armed settlers burned a Native village, along with their crops, and then demanded the Natives to turn in the murderers. When the Natives refused, a massacre followed.

Captain John Mason and his colonist army surrounded a fortified Pequot village and reportedly shouted: “We must burn them! Such a dreadful terror let the Almighty fall upon their spirits that they would flee from us and run into the very flames. Thus did the Lord Judge the heathen, filling the place with dead bodies.” The surviving Pequot were hunted and slain.

The Governor of Plymouth, William Bradford, further elaborates:

Those that escaped the fire were slain with the sword; some hewed to pieces, others run through with their rapiers, so that they were quickly dispatched and very few escaped. It was conceived they thus destroyed about 400 at this time. It was a fearful sight to see them thus frying in the fire…horrible was the stink and scent thereof, but the victory seemed a sweet sacrifice, and they gave the prayers thereof to God, who had wrought so wonderfully for them.

Perhaps most disturbingly, it is strongly argued by many historians that the Pequot Massacre led to the “Thanksgiving” festivities. The day after the massacre, the aforementioned Governor Massachusetts Bay Colony declared: “A day of Thanksgiving, thanking God that they had eliminated over 700 men, women and children.” It was signed into law that, “This day forth shall be a day of celebration and thanksgiving for subduing the Pequots.”

Now, one may ask: What about Squanto, the Wampanoag man who learned to speak English and helped the hungry, ill, and poor Pilgrims? As cited by Professor Loewen, an American high school textbook called “Land of Promise” reads:

Squanto had learned their language, the author explained, from English fishermen who ventured into the New England waters each summer. Squanto taught the Pilgrims how to plant corn, squash, and pumpkins. Would the small band of settlers have survived without Squanto’s help? We cannot say. But by the fall of 1621, colonists and Indians could sit down to several days of feast and thanksgiving to God (later celebrated as the first Thanksgiving).

Note that this text states the first Thanksgiving was on 1621. Indeed, there was a feast on that year, but it was not called a “Thanksgiving feast” nor was it repeated until years later after the Pequot Massacre in 1637. In regards to Squanto, the correct question to ask is: How did Squanto learn English? History textbooks neglect to mention that the Europeans did not perceive Squanto as an equal, but rather as “an instrument of their God” to help the “chosen people.” It is also omitted that, as a boy, Squanto was stolen by a British captain in 1605 and taken to England. He worked for a Plymouth Merchant who eventually helped him arrange passage back to Massachusetts, but less than a year later, he was seized by a British slave raider. Along with two dozen fellow Natives, Squanto was sold into slavery in Spain. He would manage to escape slavery, journey back to England, and then talk a ship captain into taking him along on his next trip to Cape Cod in 1619.

As Squanto walked back into his home village, he was horrified to find that he was the only surviving member of his village. The rest were either killed in battle or died of illness and disease. Excluding Squanto’s enslavement is to paint an incredibly distorted version of history that suggests Natives like Squanto learned English for no other reason but to help the colonists. It is to glorify the Europeans and erase the struggles and experiences of the Native people.

When history is transformed into myths, tales, and bedtime stories, we ignore historical research that enables us to learn valuable and meaningful lessons about our present, as well as about our future. History is meant to be an accurate and honest account of civilizations, cultures, and events; not a body of ethnocentric and selective alterations.

As Professor Loewen states:

Thanksgiving is full of embarrassing facts. The Pilgrims did not introduce the Native Americans to the tradition; Eastern Indians had observed autumnal harvest celebrations for centuries. Our modern celebrations date back only to 1863; not until the 1890s did the Pilgrims get included in the tradition; no one even called them ‘Pilgrims’ until the 1870s.

I did not write this article with intentions to offend or say we shouldn’t celebrate “Thanksgiving.” None of us are responsible for the atrocious deaths of Natives and Europeans. None of us caused the plague or the massacres. But as human beings, I do feel that it’s important for us to approach history with honesty and sensitivity. Perhaps some of you don’t believe this history is relevant to you, but I would strongly argue that a history that is not inclusive is a dangerously racist and prejudice one. Yes, we should spend time with our families and Loved ones, and yes, we should be grateful and thankful for all that we have, but not at the expense of ignoring an entire race of people, their culture, and their history. The fact that history textbooks and schools try to glorify the Pilgrims while omitting significant facts about the Natives represents that there is a lot to improve in the United States. Let us not become blinded by super-patriotism or blowout sales of “Black Friday.” Let us give some thought to the Native people, learn from their struggles, and embolden ourselves to stand up against racism and genocide in all forms.

They deserve your attention.

~Broken Mystic~

UPDATE: Thank you all for commenting and sharing your thoughts on this post.  Unfortunately, I do NOT write on this blog anymore, but you can still share your comments on an updated and revised piece I wrote on my new blog (see link below).  Also, there are others who have written excellent articles on the truth of “Thanksgiving” and their work certainly deserves more attention than this post.

Please bring your comments to my new blog here (where I also provide links to must-read articles):

http://muslimreverie.wordpress.com/2009/11/26/thanksgiving-and-forgotten-genocide-brainwashing-of-american-textbooks/

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Navajo members won’t watch Sunday’s solar eclipse


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Even though it’ll be in full view over the Navajo Nation in Arizona, traditional tribal members won’t look up while it’s happening.

The Navajo word for eclipse is “eating the sun.” In the Navajo tradition it is believed that the “sun dies” during a solar eclipse and that it is an intimate event between the Earth, Sun and Moon.

People are told to stay inside and keep still during the dark period. There’s no eating, drinking, sleeping, weaving or any other activity.

For Angelenos who do want to see it, the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles and Caltech in Pasadena will host viewings of the solar eclipse on Sunday afternoon.

“The moon and the sun are sacred the way they were created, and you are not supposed to watch the moon or look at, stare at it for a long time,” “It affects your mind and your body. Especially for a woman that’s carrying a baby. Because when there is an eclipse either lunar or solar, this is a sacred time where the sun, the moon and the earth is kind of like in an intimate position when they line up, so it’s such a sacred thing that’s happening, you don’t look at those things that are happening out in the sky.”

If a pregnant woman sees an eclipse of any kind, be it solar or lunar, it might “affect the mind of the woman or also in the future it will affect the health of the baby,” Begay said, and a special ceremony must be conducted to rid them of the influence.

During an eclipse, “every man, woman and child—they have to show reverence, and they don’t eat, they don’t drink water, they just go into the house until it passes,” Begay said. “And then they show respect for the moon and the sun.”

Peruvian Shamanic Wisdom for the Solar Eclipse (Plus a Powerful Alignment Practice) ~ don Oscar Miro-Quesada


Peruvian Shamanic Wisdom for the Solar Eclipse (Plus a Powerful Alignment Practice)
By Lee Doyle
Shift Team

Ancient and modern shamans alike, recognize the total solar eclipse in North America (August 21, 2017) as “Big Medicine.”

And YOU can easily engage with the healing wisdom (and add to the potency of this sacred “medicine”) with some simple preparation for the Solar Eclipse…

This historic event is so much more than an astrological happening with millions gathering to witness the brief union of moon and sun. (If you plan to be among the spectators, be sure you wear your protective eclipse glasses!).

Wherever you may be in the world, the solar eclipse marks a time in which polarities dissolve, opening us to a portal of profound connection with all of life — according to don Oscar Miro-Quesada, a Peruvian curandero (healer) and world-renowned shamanism teacher.

From microcosmic to macrocosmic… and from the cells in your body to the outer reaches of Milky Way Galaxy, the solar eclipse has a powerful, healing influence.

Align Yourself With Love & Good Intentions for the Solar Eclipse

During the 7 to 9 days before and after the total solar eclipse, you can set positive, intentions and clear out what no longer serves your heart and our world.

The solar eclipse is a time for healing wounds and relationships — and for re-aligning yourself with love, wisdom and goodness.

So, are YOU ready to partake of the first coast-to-coast (and beyond) solar eclipse in 99 years?!

In the 10-minute video below, don Oscar illuminates the shamanic significance of the solar eclipse… AND he guides you in a beautiful Alignment Practice, timed for this powerful, celestial event.

Immerse yourself in this wisdom transmission – and discover the sacred meaning of this event, in which “Father Sun and Mother Moon unite in loving embrace as one that balances all opposition… all polarity.”

Here are some highlights covered by beloved curandero, author and transpersonal psychologist don Oscar Miro-Quesada in this insightful video about this celestial event:

  • (:29) — The shamanic meaning of the solar eclipse
  • (:51) — The mythic and geographic path of the solar eclipse
  • (1:55) — Wisdom teaching on this “moment of shamanic suspended animation”
  • (2:30) — Invite harmonizing energy into your heart and mind
  • (3:43) — How to sustain the sacred medicine…YOU are a “Shining One”
  • (4:26) — Aligning your being with the unity of sun and moon, body and soul, (6:30) — don Oscar’s invocation of light and love

You’ll also see don Oscar’s incredible mesa, a ceremonial altar in the background… a centerpiece of the Pachakuti Mesa Tradition of Peruvian shamanism.

And don’t miss his fanning of the bundle of Condor Eagle feathers in an invocation of love and light…

How are you celebrating the solar eclipse? What does the union of the sun and moon represent to YOU — whether or not you’ll be able to view the eclipse? We’d love to hear from you!

Tap Into the Sacred Relationship Between the Sun and Moon and Reflect the Light of Your Own Soul Into the World (during the eclipse and beyond!)

http://blog.theshiftnetwork.com/blog/peruvian-shamanic-wisdom-solar-eclipse-plus-powerful-alignment-practice?utm_campaign=ShiningOne01&utm_medium=email&utm_source=infusionsoft&utm_content=08122017+content

10 Tribal Teachings To Live By


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I wanted to share a bit of Native American wisdom with you today.
Like many of the teachings that come from indigenous culture, the 10 virtues below are intended as a roadmap for living a more balanced and connected life.
The beauty of these ancient pillars of existence is that they always remain relevant, regardless of how evolved or learned we think we’ve become.
10 Tribal Teachings To Live By
1) The Earth is our Mother, care for her.
2) Honor your ancestors through your actions.
3) Open your heart and soul to the Great Spirit.
4) All life is sacred; treat all beings with respect.
5) Take from the Earth what is needed and nothing more.
6) Put the good of all before your own interests.
7) Give constant thanks for each new day.
8) Speak the truth; but only of good in others.
9) Follow the rhythms of nature; rise and retire with the sun.
10) Enjoy life’s journey, but leave no tracks.
They seem so simple right? But somehow these core concepts are easy to forget or take for granted when life gets challenging.
I’ve come across this list of ten before, but as I read through it again I was struck by one item in particular that really hit home. Today it was number 9, but who knows what it’ll be next time!
I hope you too find benefit in these native commandments.
Stay curious,
Nick Polizzi
Founder, The Sacred Science

Living the Mystical Life Daily Teaching: Part 1 ~ Galactic Historian


“Who you are and what you are and what you’re knowing about yourself is what’s going to change you inside yourself. We live in a limited point of view. Living the Mystical Life Daily is about striving for the unlimited point of view.”

Welcome! Are you ready to join me on this wonderful journey to awakening your spiritual presence? Are you ready to manifest and create a better you in the life that you are living? The GH team and I are changing the way we do things, and bringing you a brand new weekly design! Every Monday at 11AM PST, I will be sharing a new teaching with you all. For today’s teaching, we dive in to what The Mystical Life Daily is and how you can start living your own Mystical Life, each and every day. But remember it starts with choice, and it’s your choices that will create and manifest what you want in your life.

So enjoy this teaching, bloopers and all, and I will see you next week!

Iowa man charged with trafficking bald eagle parts


 

Note: I have no words to describe this except ‘utterly shameful’, especially coming from Native American’s when inhumane acts that desecrate the sacred nature of life are the M.O. of the White Man….face palm, shake head.

MGN
By By JAMES NORD, AP, KCRG |

RAPID CITY, S.D. (AP) — A man from Mount Vernon has been indicted by a federal grand jury in South Dakota with trafficking body parts of bald eagles.

Court documents say Jorge Pena is charged with violating multiple federal laws that protect the American Bald Eagle and the Golden Eagle.

Pena is one of fifteen involved in a Bald Eagle trafficking operation.

U.S. Attorney Randy Seiler said that officials expect “significant” additional federal charges in the case, which focused on trafficking of eagles and eagle parts and feathers for profit. Authorities said the case involves more than 100 eagles, a number that could climb as high as 250.

Seiler described one operation as basically a “chop-shop for eagles” in which eagle feathers were stuffed into garbage bags. He said it was clear that it was a moneymaking operation and that the feathers and eagle parts such as talons and beaks were treated as merchandise.

“There was no cultural sensitivity. There was no spirituality,” Seiler said. “There was no tradition in the manner in which these defendants handled these birds.”

He said the investigation involved confidential informants, a multi-state area and the purchase of regalia items such as ceremonial fans. A spokeswoman for the U.S. attorney’s office said in an email that there are a variety of reasons why people buy eagle parts, and a collectors market plays a role.

Dan Rolince, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service assistant special agent in charge of law enforcement for the region, said that some of those accused used code words to avoid detection by describing the eagle and other bird parts for sale using the names of animals or even car parts. He said the eagles were primarily shot.

“At the end of this process, I have full confidence that it will be one of the largest cases of this nature we’ve ever worked,” he said.

Three Rapid City men charged in the case are involved with Buffalo Dreamers, which performs Native American dance programs. Owner Troy Fairbanks has been charged with conspiracy to commit wildlife trafficking and violations of the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act, Migratory Bird Treaty Act and Lacey Act.

Fairbanks, 54, allegedly sold or traded eagle parts to an informant including a golden eagle head for $250, a trade involving about $5,400 of legal merchandise for eagle parts and selling two sets of eagle wings for $900. Rolince said that a whole eagle carcass would generally sell for between $1,000 and $1,200.

The indictment says Fairbanks in 2015 claimed he could acquire between 30 and 40 eagles by February 2016. Fairbanks also said in 2015 that he had 19 people in the Los Angeles area who wanted to buy “eagle feathers/parts” from him, according to the document.

It wasn’t immediately clear if Fairbanks has an attorney, and he didn’t immediately return an email from The Associated Press. A telephone number for Buffalo Dreamers went directly to voicemail.

According to another indictment, Juan Mesteth sold fans and eagle feathers to an informant. The document says Mesteth in 2015 discussed having connections in Wyoming who could get whole carcass eagles and would take the informant hunting for eagles. It wasn’t immediately clear if the 39-year-old Mesteth, of Pine Ridge, had an attorney who could speak on his behalf.

Those accused in the case include people from Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota and Wyoming. Authorities didn’t immediately disclose how much the defendants are thought to have profited in the case, and Seiler said some of the 15 defendants are unconnected to each other.

 

http://www.kcrg.com/content/news/Iowa-man-charged-with-trafficking-bald-eagle-parts–420612723.html

A Very Special Event with the Q’ero shamans of Peru ~ Carla Fox


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Yesterday, I had the opportunity to attend a very lovely event in Durango, Colorado, which is about 50 miles away from my house. As long time friends and readers of this blog may know, I was a trained shamanic practitioner and teacher of that tradition for many years before I created the Quantum Sphere Healing protocol. The tradition that is still very dear to my heart is that of the Q’ero shamans of Peru. The Q’ero people live in the high Andes Mountains above 14,000’, and maintain their traditional lifestyle to this day.

Terry and Rose Stout of Durango managed, through great effort on their part, to bring a Q’ero paqo (healer) to their town to do a group ceremony and private healing sessions. His name is don Eduardo Chura Apaza. Yesterday I attended the public ceremony at which a group despacho, or medicine bundle, was created by don Eduardo with help from everyone present.   The theme for this sacred bundle was “Visioning Highest Consciousness for All Beings and For Our Earth”. The despacho was then burned at a fire ceremony later in the evening, which is how the positive intent of the group is released.

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It has been many years since I was in the presence of a Q’ero paqo, and I had forgotten how wonderful they are. The Q’ero live a nature based life and are also intimately connected to the quantum field and their local sacred mountains, or Apus. There are less than 500 of them left in Peru, and they are united in a group consciousness through their connection to the quantum field.   They are heart centered and joyful at all times, and that energy is carried over to any one that they meet. What a delight to be in that energy again!

Don Eduardo held the higher dimensional sacred space for the creation of the despacho, and that space was warm and openhearted as well. I know that everyone present was changed as a result of being in that presence, myself included. It was a good reminder for me to live life from the heart and continue to connect deeply every day to the natural kingdom. Enjoy the photos. You may also be able to tap into the lovely energy from yesterday.

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http://thecarlafoxblog.blogspot.com/2017/03/a-very-special-event.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Thecarlafoxblog+%28TheCarlaFoxBlog%29

Ernesto Burbank | Heart Truth from Standing Rock, North Dakota (VIDEO)


On this day February 22, 2017 (originally to be published on 21-2-17 however technical glitches stopped that, the message is more vital than ever.)

Ernesto Burbank speaks straight from his heart, truth too seldom heard on Earth.

It is an honor to have walked on the sacred grounds of Oceti Sakowin, Rosebud and Sacred Stone camps. To have experienced all the veils pierced by love and the mighty power of peace. Let us rise up in song on this Blessed Day and allow ourselves to dissolve all fears and lingering doubts that have kept us from fully expressing our souls. My life was forever changed, within flows the eternal spring of gratitude for the courage of the Spiritual Warriors who put their lives on the frontline to protect our sacred ground and freedom of a chosen way of Life. To the still slumbering humanity and to those who know a high intelligent truth maintain within our consciousness that when the call comes to your door you too will have to chose life or death.

Our power is the song that unites us all, it is listening to Creator that abides inside of each of us and surrendering to the everlasting love of Mother Earth. We are the Oyate – Diné – The One People.

Mni Wiconi – Water is Life

Ah’o

Walking In Beauty

In beauty I walk
With beauty before me I walk
With beauty behind me I walk
With beauty above me I walk
With beauty around me I walk
It has become beauty again
It has become beauty again
It has become beauty again
It has become beauty again

Hózhóogo naasháa doo
Shitsijí’ hózhóogo naasháa doo
Shikéédéé hózhóogo naasháa doo
Shideigi hózhóogo naasháa doo
T’áá altso shinaagóó hózhóogo naasháa doo
Hózhó náhásdlíí’
Hózhó náhásdlíí’
Hózhó náhásdlíí’
Hózhó náhásdlíí’

Today I will walk out, today everything unnecessary will leave me,
I will be as I was before, I will have a cool breeze over my body.
I will have a light body, I will be happy forever,
nothing will hinder me.
I walk with beauty before me. I walk with beauty behind me.
I walk with beauty below me. I walk with beauty above me.
I walk with beauty around me. My words will be beautiful.

In beauty all day long may I walk.
Through the returning seasons, may I walk.
On the trail marked with pollen may I walk.
With dew about my feet, may I walk.

With beauty before me may I walk.
With beauty behind me may I walk.
With beauty below me may I walk.
With beauty above me may I walk.
With beauty all around me may I walk.

In old age wandering on a trail of beauty, lively, may I walk.
In old age wandering on a trail of beauty, living again, may I walk.
My words will be beautiful.