Firefighters Dig Until Dawn to Rescue Underground Dog


Could it be that when you name a dog “Tiger” you can expect him to be especially territorial? Well, perhaps that’s why this dog in Gulfport, Miss., decided to race down the street in pursuit of a neighborhood cat. Only problem is, there’s something just as dangerous as quicksand in the concrete “jungle” and it swallowed poor Tiger just as quickly.

Credit: Chris Henderson of Gulfport Fire Department/ Facebook

Tiger fell deep into a concrete culvert pipe near the intersection of Mississippi Avenue and Tyler Street around 9 p.m. one evening, and it wasn’t until residents exhausted their own resources that they decided to call for help at around 3 a.m. the next morning.

Credit: Chris Henderson of Gulfport Fire Department/ Facebook

Gulfport Fire Department Battalion Chief Chris Henderson, along with seven other firefighters and a pair of workers from the public works department, began working together to extricate the dog.

Credit: Chris Henderson of Gulfport Fire Department/ Facebook

It was a tedious rescue because the pipe was far too narrow for any rescue worker to fit through, so the team had to cut their way through the pipe.

Credit: Chris Henderson of Gulfport Fire Department/ Facebook

“We counted the joints in the pipe to estimate the distance, then walked off the distance on the top above the ground,” Henderson told the local ABC News affiliate.

Credit: Chris Henderson of Gulfport Fire Department/ Facebook

The firefighters dug down and then drilled holes to locate Tiger before bringing in a concrete saw to cut through the pipe and reach him.

Credit: Chris Henderson of Gulfport Fire Department/ Facebook

By 7 a.m. Tiger was pulled to safety and reunited with his guardian who planned to take him to the veterinarian as a precautionary measure although the dog appeared unharmed.

Credit: Chris Henderson of Gulfport Fire Department/ Facebook

http://www.care2.com/causes/firefighters-dig-until-dawn-to-rescue-underground-dog.html

Here, The Visitors Are In Cages & The Animals Roam Free


Note: Novel idea! It’s about time we gave wildlife a chance to gawk and poke fun at ie: “Save the Human’s”… Love it!❤

 
zoo-in-china-700x443

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By Alex Erickson,

Why do we go to the zoo? To see animals we’d never imagine coming across in our day-to-day lives wander about, eating, rolling around, and looking cute for our amazement. At least that’s what I get out of it.

As a child, I wanted to hear the trumpets of elephants, the roars of lions and tigers, the chatter of monkeys. I wanted to watch a giraffe walk elegantly about, its long neck stretching high and far for food.

I wanted to marvel at the incredible array of colours on the seemingly endless species of birds. What a beautiful thing to be able to see so many animals from all over the world in my hometown.

But long before I understood the downsides of many zoos, I wondered if the animals were happy. Maybe it was because I’d seen Free Willy too many times, or maybe it was because I had this innate feeling that being locked up was wrong, and couldn’t possibly be a part of happiness.

Even today, sometimes I stare at my cat and wonder if she is happy. I’ve given her an accessible ‘cat door’ to wander in and out of my house between the hours of 8am and whenever nightfall hits. But she mostly sleeps.

It’s often in the middle of the night that she is more exuberant, chasing bugs as a part of her nocturnal behaviour and perhaps as a way to make up for being caged in from her desire to hunt in the outdoors. But I’m scared. I don’t want her to get eaten by coyotes, and so my protective, motherly instinct keeps my cat from being free in a way that is most important to her nature.

As an adult, when I think of zoos, I imagine caged and humiliated animals meant to serve as entertainment for humans. Zoos claim to be more than just this, however, but do we really need them? The issue is controversial, with one side believing keeping animals in captivity promotes conservation and education, and the other arguing it simply supports animal cruelty.

One thing seems clear, however: no matter how you slice it, keeping any creature, endangered or not, behind a cage is inhumane. So what is the alternative? One zoo in China found an interesting way to bring people closer to the wildlife without actually caging animals. Their tactic? Put the visitors in cages instead.

zoo in China

The Lehe Ledu Wildlife Zoo allows normally caged creatures like big cats and other wildlife species, such as bears, roam free, while visitors remain in a cage. This allows people to get extremely close without subjecting the wild creatures to the inhumanity of being trapped in small cages, like most zoos throughout the world do.

“We wanted to give our visitors the thrill of being stalked and attacked by the big cats but with, of course, none of the risks,” Zoo spokeswoman Chan Llang explained.

Chunks of meat are tied to the outside of moving cages to attract animals for the visitors. Inside the vehicles, visitors are protected from being eaten. Small openings at the top allow them to offer food to the exotic beasts.

Chan Llang says all the visitors are warned “to keep their fingers and hands inside the cage at all times because a hungry tiger wouldn’t know the difference between them and breakfast.”

Lehe Ledu Wildlife Zoo was opened in 2015, and tickets were sold out for three months, proving people actually enjoyed the idea of allowing the animals to roam freely in their natural habitats while they remained behind cages themselves.

“It’s nothing like I’ve ever experienced in a zoo before,” explained visitor Tao Jen. “We’re not looking at them, they’re looking at us – and we’re lunch.”

http://www.collective-evolution.com/2016/08/13/here-the-visitors-are-in-cages-the-animals-roam-free/

This woman swings at an elephant…Now watch what the elephant does next!


Music has a certain power to it. It can completely alter our moods, relaxing our souls, and lifting our spirits. Whether it’s parents singing to their babies or people zoning out to a tune on their music player, music can sooth and relax. But it doesn’t just work on us humans, it works on animals too! At the Elephant Nature Park in Chiang Mai, Thailand, there is a special caretaker named Lek. She shows us exactly how powerful music is for her elephants. One in particular, Faa Mai, actually zones out to the sweet sound of Lek’s beautiful singing voice. Clearly these two have an incredible bond that has really been sealed with the power of music! What an amazing sight, and what an amazing woman!
Source : enlightened-planet

Read more at http://www.theinfopost.org/2016/06/this-woman-swings-at-elephantnow-watch.html#E9Gvrd2m7yZoIi5i.99

U.S. ordered to lower Navy sonar levels to protect whales


By Bob Egelko Updated 1:23 pm, Saturday, July 16, 2016

U.S. officials have wrongly allowed the Navy to use sonar at levels that could harm whales and other marine mammals in the world’s oceans, a federal appeals court in San Francisco has ruled.

The decision Friday by the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals would scale back the Navy’s use of low-frequency sonar in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans and the Mediterranean Sea under authority that was granted in 2012.

Sonar, used to detect submarines, can injure whales, seals and walruses and disrupt their feeding and mating. Environmental groups led by the Natural Resources Defense Council filed suit in San Francisco in 2012, arguing that the Obama administration had approved emissions at sound levels that violated the Marine Mammal Protection Act.

A federal magistrate disagreed but was overruled Friday by the appeals court, which said government officials had disregarded their own experts’ warnings about sonar’s potential impacts.

Under the 2012 standard, which is scheduled to expire in 2017, the National Marine Fisheries Service required the Navy to reduce sonar levels in areas known to have high populations of marine mammals but failed to order similar protections in other areas where their presence was uncertain, the court said. Those included some offshore zones that had been protected in the past and others listed by scientists as likely habitats, the court said.

The protected zones showed a “bias toward U.S. waters,” the court said, with several zones on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of the United States but none on the Pacific coast of South America and only a scattered few in other waters.

“The result is that a meaningful proportion of the world‘s marine mammal habitat is under-protected,” Judge Ronald Gould said in the 3-0 ruling, which would also set standards for future renewals of the program. He said the government had failed to comply with a law that requires it to make sure its peacetime oceanic programs have “the least practicable adverse impact on marine mammals.”

Bob Egelko is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer. Email: begelko@sfchronicle.com Twitter: @egelko

Read the ruling: http://cdn.ca9.uscourts.gov/datastore/opinions/2016/07/15/14-16375.pdf.

http://www.sfgate.com/science/article/U-S-ordered-to-lower-Navy-sonar-levels-to-8381417.php?cmpid=twitter-mobile

If You Care About Animals and the Earth, Here’s Why You Need to Boycott Palm Oil Immediately


If You Care About Animals and the Earth, Here's Why We Need to Boycott Palm Oil Immediately

25th June 2016

By Carolanne Wright

Contributing writer for Wake Up World

Found in an astounding array of foods — like baked goods, cookies, chocolate, potato chips and milk — palm oil is in half of the packaged foods that line our supermarket shelves today. It’s also heavily used in cosmetics and toiletries, to increase the feeling of creaminess in products ranging from soap to shampoo, detergents and toothpaste. The oil is used increasingly for biofuel as well. Add to this a high demand in Myanmar and Indonesia as a replacement for coconut and peanut oil, and palm oil tops the list as the most widely used vegetable oil in the world, surpassing even soy.

What most people don’t realize is how damaging the crop is to rain forests, animals and the environment. It’s one of the most destructive crops in the world — and the situation is only becoming worse…

A massive industry of environmental devastation

Only able to grow in the tropics and requiring vast amounts of water, oil palms are native to South America and West Africa. However, man-made palm plantations have spread to areas like Papua New Guinea, Kenya and Southeast Asia. It’s an enormous industry, especially in Indonesia, where the oil accounts for 11 percent of its export earnings, making it the country’s third largest export. As profitable as the oil may be, the environment pays an exceptionally high price due to these plantations.

The expansion of palm oil plantations around the world threaten vast areas of tropical rain forests. The two countries most at-risk are Indonesia and Malaysia, both of which are home to endangered orangutans. Several studies by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and Princeton University in the United States have shown palm oil plantations are causing extreme destruction to the world’s rain forests — where upwards of 60 percent of palm oil expansion is at the expense of primary tropical rain forest. These plantations not only endanger the health of the environment and orangutan populations, but also inflame conflict with local communities over traditional land rights.

Orangutan Foundation International highlights the dire consequences of palm oil production:

“In Sumatra at least 10.8 million hectares have been opened up for palm oil plantations. The situation in Borneo is similar. Large scale conversion of tropical rain forests has had an absolutely devastating impact on biodiversity in both Borneo and Sumatra. In addition, deforestation may cause soil erosion and, because most forests have been cleared through the use of fire, massive air pollution from smoke. Much of the land on which palm oil plantations have been established consists of peat swamp forest. The draining, burning, and conversion of peat swamp forests to palm oil has been especially damaging to the world’s climate as it has led to Indonesia being the third largest contributor of carbon to the world’s atmosphere after China and the United States.”

If You Care About Animals and the Earth, Here's Why We Need to Boycott Palm Oil Immediately - Oil Palm Fruit
Oil Palm Fruit

Palm oil companies tend to clear primary forests — instead of degraded areas — for plantations because the forest land can be cleared by fire, which naturally fertilizes the soil and saves the company money. Over and above that, any timber that’s cut can in turn be sold for a profit. Once the plantation is established, displaced orangutans are often brutally killed as the starving animals try to obtain food in the plantation areas. The animals have been found buried alive, as well as killed by machete and guns. The industry considers orangutans ‘agricultural pests.’ It’s estimated that 50,000 orangutans have died over the last two decades due to palm oil plantations.

Sumatran Tiger, Sumatran Rhinoceros, Sun Bear, Pygmy Elephant, Clouded Leopard and Proboscis Monkey populations have also suffered from the encroachment of palm oil plantations on their natural habitats.

“According to the World Wildlife Fund, an area the equivalent size of 300 football fields of rainforest is cleared each hour to make way for palm oil production. This large-scale deforestation is pushing many species to extinction, and findings show that if nothing changes species like the orangutan could become extinct in the wild within the next 5-10 years, and Sumatran tigers less than 3 years.” [source]

Orangutan hands - national geographic - visions of earth 2011
Image from “Visions of Earth”, © National Geographic 2011

Sustainable palm oil: fact or fiction?

You might have noticed over the last few years the appearance of red palm oil in health food stores being marketed as a healthy cooking oil. Take a closer look at the label and it will say the oil is sustainably harvested and does not impact orangutan habitat. This may ease our minds as consumers, but are these products actually safe for the environment, local communities and animal habitats?

In 2004 the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) established voluntary guidelines to develop less destructive methods of palm oil production — including ways to protect land rights of local people. While they appear promising on the surface, many activists claim the guidelines are simply “greenwashing” the issue — largely because forests continue to be destroyed, wildlife killed and local people jailed after protesting the seizure of their land. In short, it’s just business as usual.

If we truly would like to make an impact, there are several straightforward actions that can be taken today. Have a look at this handy resource list by Say NO to Palm Oil, with practical ways you can live more ethically through your consumption choices.

The Insatiable Demand for Palm Oil

Article sources:

About the author:

Carolanne WrightCarolanne Wright enthusiastically believes if we want to see change in the world, we need to be the change. As a nutritionist, natural foods chef and wellness coach, Carolanne has encouraged others to embrace a healthy lifestyle of organic living, gratefulness and joyful orientation for over 13 years.

Through her website Thrive-Living.net, she looks forward to connecting with other like-minded people from around the world who share a similar vision. You can also follow Carolanne on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest.

Further reading from Carolanne Wright:

 

http://wakeup-world.com/2016/06/25/if-you-care-about-animals-and-the-earth-heres-why-you-need-to-boycott-palm-oil-immediately/

2012 The Awakening is supported by donations by the generosity of readers honoring the “energetic exchange for value” concept. And, by supporting the merchant affiliate programs by purchasing goods with the links provided below.

If links are dead, please contact me at { ascendingstarseed at gmail dot com }.

Mahalo nui, Annette

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What Came Before, featuring Steve-O: The Truth About Meat and Modern Farms


Factory farms dominate U.S. food production, employing abusive practices that maximize agribusiness profits at the expense of the environment, our communities, animal welfare, and even our health.

Far from the idyllic, spacious pastures that are shown in advertisements for meat, milk, and eggs, factory farms typically consist of large numbers of animals being raised in extreme confinement. Animals on factory farms are regarded as commodities to be exploited for profit. They undergo painful mutilations and are bred to grow unnaturally fast and large for the purpose of maximizing meat, egg, and milk production for the food industry. Their bodies cannot support this growth, which results in debilitating and painful conditions and deformities.

The factory farming industry puts incredible strain on our natural resources. The extreme amount of waste created by raising so many animals in one place pollutes our land, air, and water. Residents of rural communities surrounding factory farms report high incidents of illness, and their property values are often lowered by their proximity to industrial farms. To counteract the health challenges presented by overcrowded, stressful, unsanitary living conditions, antibiotics are used extensively on factory farms, which can create drug-resistant bacteria and put human health at risk.

To learn more about the devastating effects of factory farming on animals, human health, and the planet, explore the links to the left.

Purina Sued for Allegedly Killing 4,000 Dogs With ‘Toxic’ Food


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We love our pets. Our dogs are members of the family. To many of us, they are one of the kids – the furry one. But are we as careful with what we feed our pets as what we feed our children? Frequently, ads for pet food claim that they have “real” food, but the ingredients end up being things like wheat gluten meal, animal by-products, and corn by-products. Nestle’s Purina Beneful brand, one of the most popular brands of dog food, is currently facing a class action lawsuit claiming their food caused serious health issues or even death in over 3,000 dogs. A little digging into consumer reviews of Beneful comes back with story after story of dogs suffering from massive internal health issues. Maybe it’s time to start looking more closely at the food you’re feeding your dog and start replacing the chicken by-product meal with actual chicken.



What’s the Deal with Conventional Dog Food?

There are many dog owners waiting for the decision in the class action lawsuit against Beneful. Reviews from dog owners who have fed their dogs Beneful have similar distressing symptoms. These dogs develop incontinence, internal bleeding, liver malfunction, and seizures. There are two ingredients that are potentially causing the most damage. The first is propylene glycol, a chemical used in antifreeze that nevertheless has been approved by the FDA for dog food and other products like salad dressings and cake mixes. Propylene glycol has caused products to be banned in Europe. It is considered less toxic than the ethylene glycol usually used in antifreeze, but it’s still a chemical you don’t need your dog ingesting.

Another possible cause of these dog poisonings is mycotoxins from improperly stored grains. With the widespread incidences of liver failure cited in the lawsuit, it makes sense that this is being caused by toxins. Dog foods contain large quantities of grain from multiple sources, so the testing for contaminated ingredients is inconsistent and ineffective. Lax testing and regulation coupled with the tendency of large corporations to meet the bare minimum standards for quality makes it more than possible that Purina Beneful and many other dogs foods contain mycotoxins. Several consumers report that their Beneful products had maggots. Many of the symptoms reported by pet owners are consistent with mycotoxin poisoning. Because conventional dog food relies so heavily on grains, without extensive regulating, the threat of mycotoxins will always be there.

 Is Homemade Dog Food the Answer?

It’s interesting to note the ways in which food for dogs mirrors our food. Conventional dog food brings to mind fast food – cheap and easy. What would happen if we put as much care into our pet’s food as we do into ours? It sounds like a lot of work and a lot of money. Even so, reading the stories from Beneful customers who have had to rush their dog to the vet, watched them suffer, or found them dead is sobering. Does the time and money balance out in the end?



Check the ingredients in your dog food. Avoid animal by-products, excessive grains, sugar, and preservatives. Making your dog’s food at home allows you to feed them a balanced diet of whole foods with any chemicals or preservatives. Mix raw, organic vegetables and organic, grass fed ground meat like beef or bison in a food processor. You can use a variety of vegetables (no onions, though!) and also add extras like eggs or avocado. If your dog is having health issues, homemade food can make all the difference in the world. Check out Cancer cure (for dogs only). We also give all of our dogs (and humans) in the family, Total Nutrition Formula. Your pets are important members of your family. Why not show them a little extra love with a better quality of food?

Sources:

http://www.nydailynews.com

http://www.organiclifestylemagazine.com

http://www.organiclifestylemagazine.com

http://www.onlynaturalpet.com

http://www.consumeraffairs.com

http://www.thedailybeast.com

About the author:
Kristina works at Green Lifestyle Market. A few years ago Kristina was no stranger to illness, but she decided to pursue health and vitality through natural means when she became pregnant. She quickly learned that she could prevent morning sickness and other common ailments other pregnant woman experienced with the right diet. After a healthy home birth, and a beautiful child, she never looked back. Kristina has not had so much as a cold since, and at two years old and unvaccinated, neither has her child. She’s passionate about natural health, environmental conservation, and raising her healthy baby without pharmaceuticals.

Original Source

http://complete-health-and-happiness.com/purina-sued-for-allegedly-killing-4000-dogs-with-toxic-food/

Amazing Moment A Canadian Moose Chilling in an Inflatable Pool (Photos)


 

Kathy Johnson’s 2-year-old grandson was bullied out of his kiddie pool this week in the wildlife-rich Painted Hills neighborhood of Spokane Valley.

A bull moose took refuge from temperatures in the 80s Tuesday afternoon by sneaking into the Johnsons’ backyard and cooling off in the inflatable pool.

“It’s not really one of those little pools,” Johnson said. “It’s actually quite big except when there’s a moose in it. “The funny thing is that just last week a cow moose did the same thing,” she said, as though word was spreading through the valley moose population that the Johnson’s pool was a hot-spot for beating the summer heat.

“The cow hung out in the pool for a long time and then got up and nibbled around the yard,” Johnson said. “The bull didn’t stay as long, and when he got up from the pool he moved on.”

Johnson was especially amazed that the hooves of the adult-size moose, which can weigh well over 500 pounds, did no damage to the plastic pool.
 Source

Photos Credit: Newfoundland Glassman 

Fast food binges from garbage dumps turning bears into ‘couch potatoes’


© Laurent Geslin/NaturePL.com
Foraging for rubbish

Garbage dumps are turning bears into couch potatoes. A survey of brown bears in north-east Turkey has revealed how visiting a dump has completely changed local bears’ lifestyles. Bears that visited the dump became more sedentary, no longer migrating and foraging over the same distance as those that didn’t.

“It’s surprising that two substantially distinct lifestyles can develop and coexist within a small and isolated subpopulation,” says Gabriele Cozzi of the University of Zurich in Switzerland. This is a first for brown bears, he says, although such differences have been found within groups of black bears.

Cozzi and his team radio-tagged 16 bears, then followed their movement for an average of 10 months, and up to 20 months. They found that the 10 “dump bears” – seven males and three females – did not stray far from the dump, except to hibernate during the winter.

By contrast, the six bears – three males and three females – that never visited the dump ventured far and wide. These bears migrated an average of 165 kilometres each year in search of food, especially in the period before hibernation, when they were probably “fattening up”.

The local authority in the city of Sarikamis is currently planning to close the dump. Cozzi’s survey was partly carried out to assess what the fate of the bears might be if this happened.

The best outcome, say the researchers, would be for the bears to revert to their previous forest existence. The other two possibilities are not so rosy: that the bears could die of malnutrition, or that they could instead forage in the city and its nearby villages.

“We anticipate that the situation could change, with bears venturing into the city should the dump close,” says Cozzi. “Bears may become too dangerous and be shot, and people may be injured.”

Recent incidents in Japan in which wild bears killed and ate parts of people suggest this scenario is far from fanciful. “Bear attacks on people are not unheard of around Sarikamis, and I’m aware of at least one case in 2013,” says Cozzi.

Back into the wild?

But Cozzi’s hope is that the bears can be “repatriated” into their natural habitat, a forest that there are plans to later link up with forests further north as an extended wildlife corridor. “The most important thing is to continue monitoring the bears to see how they react to the [dump’s] closure and the establishment of the wildlife corridor,” says Cozzi.

“This study reveals the complex consequences that human influence can have on a species that has adapted to human-altered landscapes,” says Andrea Flack of the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Radolfzell, Germany. “The brown bear has adjusted its habits and is now either showing this fascinating migratory behaviour or feeding on garbage dumps.”

Flack, whose own studies have focused on how contact with humans alters the migration habits of storks, warns that the bears’ reliance on the dump means that care must be taken about closing it.

“Although closing garbage dumps in the near future is most likely beneficial for the environment, we have to make sure that we don’t harm those species that came to rely on them,” she says.

Journal reference: Journal of Zoology, DOI: 10.1111/jzo.12365

https://www.sott.net/article/321729-Fast-food-binges-from-garbage-dumps-turning-bears-into-couch-potatoes

Woman Adopts 21-Year-Old Cat Abandoned By Owner, Creates Bucket List Full Of Adventures


At the sunset of his life, 21-year-old cat Tigger was left behind by his owner at a local veterinary clinic. Depressed and disoriented, he couldn’t comprehend why. But then Adriene Nicole showed up. She read his story on the Canton Neighbors page and chose to adopt him. She wished to provide him the love and care he deserved.

Unfortunately, Nicole shortly found out that Tigger had kidney failure and a tumor. But that didn’t hold Nicole back: “Though he has kidney failure and we found a tumor, he kicks it like a 12 yr old. We decided to create a bucket list full of random adventures [for Tigger],” she wrote on Facebook.

“Though it might not be much to others, all the little trips outside are a blast for him because he loves to be outdoors… the beach being his favorite so far,” she said. “The most important part is that Tigger’s story just shows how amazing it is to adopt a geriatric pet and give them the best remaining days! He has forever changed our hearts and will hopefully change the hearts of others when it comes to adopting older pets!”

More info: Facebook | h/t: lovemeow


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Covered in ash: Chinstrap penguins threatened by volcanic eruption


© Pete Bucktrout, British Antarctic Survey
Volcanic ash threatens an enormous colony of chinstrap penguins.

The hatcheries of migratory penguins can be magical places, full of fluffy chicks and doting parents. But things are less picturesque when you add volcanic ash to the mix. A volcano on the northernmost island of an archipelago in the South Atlantic Ocean has been spewing ash and smoke since March, threatening one of the largest colonies of penguins in the world, according to a new study.

Zavodovski Island, one of the South Sandwich Islands, is uninhabited by humans, but it is home to more than 1 million chinstrap penguins, according to the British Antarctic Survey (BAS). BAS researchers found the volcanic eruption via satellite imagery and fishermen from nearby South Georgia were able to photograph ash blowing eastward across the island over penguin-nesting grounds.

“We donꞌt know what impact the ash will have on the penguins,” Peter Fretwell, a geographer with the BAS, said in a statement. “If it has been heavy and widespread it may have a serious effect on the population.”

The chinstrap penguin (Pygoscelis antarctica) stands about 30 inches (75 centimeters) tall and eats mostly krill (tiny crustaceans). These penguins are abundant throughout the sub-Antarctic region, and there are at least 8 million in the wild, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature.

The penguins forage at sea from March until November, when they return to their colonies to breed. When the eruption began in March, some straggling penguins may have still been molting, shedding old feathers and growing new ones, and were unable to leave the island, said Wayne Trivelpiece, a biologist with the National Marine Fisheries Service who has studied penguins for 40 years.

There is evidence of prior volcanic activity on Zavodovski Island, according to the BAS, but the extent of that volcanism and its effect on wildlife on the remote island are unknown. Two expeditions are planned later this year to evaluate damage from the eruption, Fretwell said.

But the main effects of the eruption, Trivelpiece said, won’t be known until the penguins return to the island, where 10 to 15 percent of the world’s chinstraps nest. “If the ash covers everything, that will make a difference,” he said, “That’s not going to be good terrain to lay eggs in.”

Ultimately, like the BAS, Trivelpiece is taking a wait-and-see approach in assessing the effects of the eruption by Mount Curry on the island’s penguin population. He said the ash could be blown out to sea, or the “very adaptable” chinstraps may find alternative nesting grounds.

“We donꞌt really know,” Trivelpiece told Live Science. “We’d just be guessing.”

https://www.sott.net/article/321751-Covered-in-ash-Chinstrap-penguins-threatened-by-volcanic-eruption

Olympics Mascot Juma the Jaguar Shot Dead


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The Brazilian team’s official mascot for the 2016 Summer Olympics being held in Rio de Janeiro this August is a smiling cartoon jaguar named Ginga. But a real, live jaguar named Juma was probably not very happy after an Olympic torch relay ceremony held June 20 in Manaus, Brazil.

Juma lived in the Brazilian Amazon — in a zoo that’s attached to a military jungle training camp. The 17-year-old jaguar spent her life there, ever since she was taken in as a cub after her mother died.

As the Olympic torch was carried through the camp, Juma — who’d been drugged beforehand – was removed from her enclosure, chained and put on display. After she was returned to her enclosure, she managed to escape. Still inside the zoo, she was shot with four tranquilizer darts. When she approached a soldier, Juma was shot dead.

The army’s press office said Juma, a “docile animal used to living among people at the center,” was killed to protect the soldiers.

Why was a member of a threatened species – jaguars are already extinct in Uruguay and El Salvador – subjected to such a stressful event?

Rescued jaguars are “sometimes kept as mascots by jungle battalions and shown at military parades,” BBC Brazil reports. Juma was a mascot for the Manaus infantry battalion.

“Often, jaguars already are stressed by being kept in captivity, that’s only compounded when they’re exposed to hubbub,” University of Brasilia animal behavior scientist Joao Paulo Castro told BBC Brazil. The Rio 2016 Organizing Committee was responsible for this irresponsible event.

 

“We made a mistake in permitting the Olympic torch, a symbol of peace and unity, to be exhibited alongside a chained wild animal,” it said in a statement. “This image goes against our beliefs and our values. We guarantee that there will be no more such incidents at Rio 2016.”

Putting Juma on display was not authorized, according to the Amazonas State Institute for Environmental Protection (Ipaam), which oversees the use of wild animals in Brazil.

“No request was made to authorize the participation of the jaguar ‘Juma’ in the event of the Olympic torch,” Ipaam stated. The organization is investigating the incident.

The killing of Juma has sparked outrage around the world. The Rio 2016 Facebook page is filled with angry comments from people appalled by her death and vowing not to watch the Olympics.

Carlos Durigan, director of WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) Brazil, is among the many wildlife experts who don’t think Juma belonged at the torch ceremony.

“I don’t think the jaguar is a good mascot, especially like this – chained up, like a trophy on display,” Durigan told the Guardian.

“Even in her reportedly drugged state, this jaguar knew to bolt from her life of misery the second she could, and she paid for her yearning for freedom with her life,” said Brittany Peet, director of the PETA Foundation’s captive animal law enforcement. “When will we learn?”

In its statement about the killing of Juma, the Rio 2016 Organizing Committee said, “Even when interaction with wild animals is part of the local culture, the exhibition of these species will not be permitted on the torch relay.”

On the torch relay? Under no circumstances should a wild animal be subjected to such stress during any other event, merely for people’s entertainment – even when it’s allegedly “part of local culture.”

Demand justice for Juma by signing and sharing this petition urging Ipaam to stop allowing wild animals to be used at events.

And if there’s an issue that you care about, whether it’s local or national, start your own petition! Use this guide to get started and watch it grow as the Care2 community rallies around your cause.

Why You Should Avoid Palm Oil Like The Plague **BOYCOTT PALM OIL NOW**


Note: You can take action NOW to help save orangutans by reading all food labels and BOYCOTTING PRODUCTS which contain PALM OIL.  We are the Ones we waited for, embody the change we seek. ….Much love, {~A~}

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Palm oil is used in many things from chips and baked goods to shampoo and cleaning products to an oil used for cooking. It is the most widley used vegetable oil in the world. It even sounds healthier because it’s different from GMO vegetable oil like canola. It comes from a palm fruit grown on an African oil palm tree so what could be unhealthy, harmful, or unsustainable about that? Well it’s contributing to the death of thousands of orangutans and many other animals who live in the forests. Not to mention, it’s affecting the indigenous people and the environment.

An area of forest equal to 300 soccer fields is beings destroyed every hour for the purpose of growing oil palms. 

Palm oil is grown throughout Africa, Asia, North America and South America. This industry of exporting palm oil is not sustainable. Producing palm oil is linked to major issues like deforestation, habitat degradation, climate change, and animal cruelty. Many animals throughout the jungles of Borneo and Sumatra are injured, killed and displaced. The forests must be cleared for the development of palm oil and this is done by setting fire to the land which destroys not only their home, but leads to many of the animals burning to death. The deforestation also increases access to the animals for poachers and wildlife smugglers (who capture for pets, medicinal uses, or body parts).

Some orangutans are even shot by plantation owners or farmers because the animals are viewed as ‘pests.’

Orangutans live on these Indonesian islands and the palm oil industry is one of the main contributors to the dramatic reduction of orangutan populations. Orangutans live in areas with fertile lowland soils, close to rivers and therefore their habitat is seen as ideal for growing the oil palm.

HOW CAN WE HELP

Europe is aware when palm oil is an ingredient in their store-bought food, but the U.S. is still left in the dark. EU law on food information to consumers (FIC) means that there is no hidden ingredients under generic titles, such as palm oil written as vegetable oil. If Europe can pass this law, why can’t the rest of us? We must lobby for palm oil to be labelled as well so we can choose which products to buy.

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Also, here is a petition to sign to demand only sustainable palm oil: Save Orangutans

Credit: the-open-mind, Real Farmacy

Sources: http://www.saynotopalmoil.com/Whats_the_issue.php

http://intentious.com/2013/03/31/would-you-kill-an-orangutan-say-no-to-palm-oil/

http://www.orangutan.org.au/palm-oil

http://orangutan.org/rainforest/the-effects-of-palm-oil/

http://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/2014/dec/12/eu-labelling-changes-palm-oil-consumer-change

FLASHBACK: German scientist: ‘Electronic smog is disrupting nature on a massive scale’


Image

© Nickolay Lamm
Frequency fence: Visualisations from U.S artist Nickolay Lamm based on how mobile networks and frequencies are distributed across U.S. cities

Mobile phones, Wi-Fi systems, electric power lines and similar sources of “electrosmog” are disrupting nature on a massive scale, causing birds and bees to lose their bearings, fail to reproduce and die, a conference will be told this week.

Dr Ulrich Warnke – who has been researching the effects of man-made electrical fields on wildlife for more than 30 years – will tell the conference, organised by the Radiation Research Trust at the Royal Society in London, that an unprecedented dense mesh of artificial magnetic, electrical and electromagnetic fields” has been generated, overwhelming the “natural system of information” on which the species rely.

He believes this could be responsible for the disappearance of bees in Europe and the US in what is known as colony collapse disorder, for the decline of the house sparrow, whose numbers have fallen by half in Britain over the past 30 years, and that it could also interfere with bird migration.

Dr Warnke, a lecturer at the University of Saarland, in Germany, adds that the world’s natural electrical and magnetic fields have had a “decisive hand in the evolution of species. Over millions of years they learned to use them to work out where they were, the time of day, and the approach of bad weather.

Now, he says, “man-made technology has created transmitters which have fundamentally changed the natural electromagnetic energies and forces on the earth’s surface. Animals that depend on natural electrical, magnetic and electromagnetic fields for their orientation and navigation are confused by the much stronger and constantly changing artificial fields.”

His research has shown that bees exposed to the kinds of electrical fields generated by power lines killed each other and their young, while ones exposed to signals in the same range as mobile phones lost much of their homing ability. Studies at the University of Koblenz-Landau, reported in The Independent on Sunday last year, have found bees failed to return to their hives when digital cordless phones were placed in them, while an Austrian survey noted that two-thirds of beekeepers with mobile phone masts within 300 metres had suffered unexplained colony collapse.

Dr Warnke also cites Spanish and Belgian studies showing that the number of sparrows near mobile phone masts fell as radiation increased. And he says that migrating birds, flying in formation, had been seen to split up when approaching the masts.

But the Mobile Operators Association, representing the UK’s five mobile phone companies, says a US research group has found collapsing bee colonies in areas with no mobile phone service, and Denis Summers-Smith, a leading expert on sparrows, has described the link as “nonsense“.

Comment: Indeed, and there is good evidence that the cancer pandemic and other ‘diseases of civilization’ are strongly correlated, if not caused by, the exponential proliferation of EMF pollution.

Check out Larry Bowers’ 4-part series on EMF pollution, beginning here:

EMF pollution – What is EMF?

 

https://www.sott.net/article/297845-German-scientist-Electronic-smog-is-disrupting-nature-on-a-massive-scale

Elephant Orphans… Wisdom of the Wild


From ArgoFilm’s “Wisdom of the Wild” comes the moving story of Daphne Sheldrick and her elephant orphanage. This documentary was produced for PBS’ Nature Series.

Join our journey by subscribing to our channel! Our Emmy Award winning films seek to lend a voice to those who cannot speak for themselves.

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On the Anniversary of Cecil’s Death, House Democrats Target Trophy Hunting


taxidermied-animals
A new report questions the claim that trophy hunting in Africa benefits wildlife conservation.
Taxidermic animals on display at a convention. (Photo: Ted Soqui/Corbis via Getty Images)
Jun 14, 2016
Taylor Hill is an associate editor at TakePart covering environment and wildlife.

Bio

It’s been nearly a year since an American hunter killed Cecil, an iconic lion in Zimbabwe. House Democrats are using the anniversary to question the premise that trophy hunting benefits Africa’s endangered wildlife.

In a new report called Missing the Mark, the Democratic staff of the House Committee on Natural Resources charges that Zimbabwe, Tanzania, Namibia, and South Africa are providing U.S. officials with little evidence that taxes and fees raised from trophy hunts targeting lions, leopards, elephants, and rhinoceroses provide conservation benefits and have an overall net-positive impact on imperiled species.
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The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which has the authority to grant a thumbs-up or thumbs-down to American trophy hunters wishing to bring animal trophies into the country, has too often supported nations’ claims that the hunts enhance the survival of the species, the report charged.

“You can’t make the assumption that these countries are using the funds for conservation. You have to have the proof,” said Matt Strickland, a member of the committee’s Democratic staff. “U.S. hunters are responsible for taking a lot of animal trophies from Africa, and we want to make sure the Fish and Wildlife Service is doing its job in permitting trophy imports, and Americans aren’t contributing to the decline of certain species.”

American hunters wanting to import the heads, horns, pelts, or any other parts of animals they have killed overseas must request a permit from the Fish and Wildlife Service.

If the animal has threatened or endangered species protections under the Endangered Species Act, the agency requires that the hunt enhance the survival of the species. The agency is also responsible for managing U.S. compliance with the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, which regulates and permits the hunting of endangered species as well.

“On paper, all four countries examined have equally strong frameworks for ensuring that trophy hunts benefit species conservation,” the authors wrote. “Unfortunately, the implementation of these frameworks has in many cases been marred by corruption and has not produced the advertised and desired results.”

The Fish and Wildlife Service has sometimes turned a blind eye to these shortfalls and granted import permits for animals killed in these countries, said Strickland. “They accepted at face value that trophy hunting benefits wildlife conservation without drilling down and actually checking on individual cases,” he said.

An agency spokesperson stated in an email that the agency is reviewing the report, adding, “By law, we cannot and will not allow trophies of certain protected species into the United States that were hunted in any nation whose conservation program fails to meet high standards for transparency, scientific management and effectiveness. If we have concerns about a country’s management program or a species’ population status, we will not issue permits.”
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One such case occurred in 2014, when the agency shut down imports of elephant trophies from Zimbabwe and Tanzania because of the species’ marked population decline. “They also weren’t providing any evidence that the hunts were benefiting conservation, so Fish and Wildlife stopped allowing it,” Strickland said. “We’d like to see more of that type of decision making regularly.”

That’s the exception, not the norm, according to the report, which noted thousands of cases in which the Fish and Wildlife Service used special rules and loopholes to exempt hunters from permitting requirements for many species listed as endangered. The report authors found that between 2010 and 2014, the agency could have required permits for more than 2,700 hunting trophies imported to the county yet only required one, for a critically endangered black rhinoceros. Of 1,469 leopard trophies that could have mandated an import permit, the agency required none.

In other instances, such as the controversial baiting tactics that lured Cecil out of a protected area and led to his death at the hands of Walter Palmer, the trophy hunting industry isn’t “playing by the rules,” the report stated, and “needs to be regulated and held accountable for there to be any hope of a consistent conservation benefit.”

To help rein in the negative impacts of trophy hunting on wildlife, the report recommends that the Fish and Wildlife Service deny import requests from hunters convicted of wildlife violations, close loopholes that allow some trophies to be imported without permits, collect more data on trophy hunting through the permitting process, and increase permit fees to fund science and conservation.

 

http://www.takepart.com/article/2016/06/14/cecil-death-democrats-target-trophy-hunting?cmpid=tpdaily-eml-2016-06-15-C2

Forget Weather, Kenyan GDP Threatened By “Marauding Monkeys”


Tyler Durden's picture

In developed countries (like America) with sophisticated capital markets, complex adaptive supply chains, and experienced PhD economists running the economy, it is the weather that is to blame when data disappoints and throws cold water on a status-quo-maintaining narrative. But in Kenya, there is a force far greater than Mother Nature when it comes to potentially destroying the economy… the vervet monkey!!


A vervet monkey triggered a nationwide blackout in Kenya after it fell onto a transformer at one of the nation’s main hydroelectric plants, Kenya Electricity Generating Co. said. As Bloomberg reports,

The monkey climbed on to the roof of the Gitaru facility and may have been thrown off balance and onto a transformer, tripping the equipment and causing an overload on other machines at the plant, according to a statement e-mailed by the Nairobi-based power generator, known as KenGen. The animal survived the incident, it said.

The primate accessed the plant even though KenGen’s facilities are secured by electric fences designed to keep out “marauding wild animals,” the company said.

KenGen supplies 80 percent of the electricity in East Africa’s biggest economy.

The incident resulted in the loss of more than 180 megawatts from the plant, setting off the blackout, according to the utility. Supply has since been restored and power-generating units are operating normally, it said.

Perhaps it is time for Janet to import some Kenyan monkeys (if she hasn’t already) because we suspect we are going to need something other than weather to explain this…

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http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-06-08/forget-weather-kenyan-gdp-threatened-marauding-monkeys

Hundreds of crow attacks tracked on new online map: Creator refuses to be ‘run off the street by crows’


Gemma Karstens-Smith, The Canadian Press  06.01.2016

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VANCOUVER — People with ornithophobia have a new tool to fight their fear of birds — a map that tracks crow attacks.

Instructors at Langara College in Vancouver used open-source software to create the online map, which allows anyone with an Internet connection to pinpoint where they were attacked and add details, such as how aggressive the bird was.

Jim O’Leary teaches Geographic Information Systems at the college and says he and his colleague Rick Davidson wanted to show how the course content could be put to use.

O’Leary says he was inspired to start tracking crow attacks after witnessing several in downtown Vancouver last year and thinking that recording them could help better understand the problem.

The birds are particularly aggressive during the spring, when they are protecting their nests.

Hundreds of attacks have been documented on the map since it launched in April, including reports from Victoria and Antigonish, N.S.

O’Leary says he and his colleague didn’t know how popular the map would become.

“I originally envisioned it as being the greater Vancouver area, but crow attacks seem to touch a nerve with people. It seems like many people have a crow story that they want to tell,” he says. “I guess crows are aggressive everywhere.”

Mapping the attacks helps establish where the most aggressive crows are and gives an idea of whether there are any patterns, O’Leary says.

“With all our technology skills, we shouldn’t be run off the street by the crows. So this is our response,” he says. “The first part of a solution is to find out what a problem is.”

So far, there have been dozens of attacks reported in downtown Vancouver, and O’Leary says he believes there are more crows in the area because of the concentration of garbage cans and tall trees.

O’Leary says he isn’t sure whether governments would be interested in the information, but notes that it’s all public and at least it gives people an idea of where the crows are located.

“At the very least, people can vent their frustrations and they can see where the concentrations are,” he says.

It has also taught O’Leary that the birds are more aggressive than he ever imagined. He’s heard reports of crows banding together to dive-bomb a passerby, and of birds targeting dogs and cats.

The map has also sparked interest in Langara’s Geographic Information Systems certificate program, which teaches students how to manage and use geographic data.

O’Leary says seven people signed up for his course within a week of the map gaining notoriety.

http://www.vancouversun.com/News/11959750/story.html

Horrible Discovery in Tiger Temple: Dozens of Dead Tiger Kittens (Photos)


Note: As heartbreaking and horrific as this story is, thankfully we’re beginning to see authorities crack-down on animal abuse and neglect, illegal sales of animal parts etc. It appears Wildlife authorities have been working on cracking this case for sometime and fortunately for the remaining 147 tigers, they finally made progress in getting the evidence they need to remove and rescue the tigers. Hopefully those responsible will be found and held accountable for their crimes.

Dead tiger cubs, deer horns, a dead bearcat and a bull skull are displayed Wednesday at the Tiger Temple.

By Chayanit Itthipongmaetee
Staff Reporter

KANCHANABURI — At least 40 dead tiger cubs were discovered this morning inside the controversial Tiger Temple.

Rows of cubs’ bodies that look freshly killed are lined up in photos, as reports of other disturbing discoveries of other parts of animals, including some protected species, are made.


UPDATE: Officers Enter Tiger Temple to Begin Removing Tigers


The first image was posted to Twitter by Dario Pignatelli, a Bangkok-based photojournalist. Speaking by telephone, he said he took the photo at around 10:30am, and counted at least 40 bodies.

Photo: Dario Pignatelli / Twitter

 

A Khaosod reporter at the scene confirmed Pignatelli’s account. He also reported seeing animal intestines in containers, heaps of deer horns, a dead bearcat and a bull’s skull. Bearcats, also known as binturongs, are protected animals under Thai laws.

Wildlife activists have long accused the Tiger Temple of animal abuse and trafficking tigers and their body parts. The temple has vehemently denied the allegations.

If the tiger cubs indeed turn out to have just been killed, it would support accusations it was knowingly engaged in illegal, for-profit breeding and trafficking of the animals.

The discovery came on the third day of a monumental operation by wildlife authorities to remove all of the 147 tigers from the temple, which has kept the animals illegally and profited from them for years.

The dead cubs were found stacked in a freezer vault where food for the tigers such as frozen chickens is kept, according to regional wildlife official Yanyong Lekavichit, who is in charge of the ongoing raid.

“This is abnormal,” said Yanyong, head of Protected Area Regional Office 3, adding that his team is investigating.

“We will find out who’s responsible for the cubs,” he said.

The management of the temple, known officially as Wat Pha Luang Ta Bua Yanasampanno, had repeatedly resisted efforts by the Department of National Park to take the tigers away, and only relented on Monday when the officials showed up with a court order.

Tiger Temple lawyer Saiyood Pengboonchoo was not immediately available for comment.


Forty tigers have been removed from the Tiger Temple since Monday — seven on Monday and 33 Tuesday. This makes total 50 tigers out of 147 relocated to new homes at the wildlife breeding research station in Ratchaburi province.

Tourists are no longer allowed inside the temple, officials said.

Additional reporting by Teeranai Charuvastra

Correction: An earlier version of this story mistakenly identified one of the dead animals found at the temple as a boar. This was later found to be a bearcat.

 

http://www.khaosodenglish.com/detail.php?newsid=1464757648

Australia Covered Up Reef Destruction in UN Report TheLipTV


Australia covered up the destruction of the Great Barrier Reef along with potential threats to the Tasmania wilderness and Kakadu in a UN report on the impact of climate change. The Australian government ordered the chapter be removed from the report, issued by Unesco and the UN Environment Program on Thursday, over fears it could deter visitors to the World Heritage Sites, which attract billions of dollars in tourism each year. This comes after reports over the weekend showing that mass bleaching has killed over 35 percent of coral in the northern and central parts of the Great Barrier Reef. We look at how climate change is destroying the Great Barrier Reef on the Lip News with Elliot Hill and Joya Mia Italiano.

http://www.theguardian.com/environmen…

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