Minnesota, Wisconsin and Wyoming have decided to eradicate wolves


Note: The only thing that will prevent this crime against the environment is public outrage, it’s time to SHAME your local Senator. Flood their offices with calls and PLEASE SHARE this information before it’s too late for wolves in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Wyoming. Mahalo

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 Wolf, wolves, Yellowstone, hunt, hunting

“War on Wolves Act” Senators from Midwest and Wyoming introduce bill to strip protections from endangered gray wolves

Senators from Minnesota, Wisconsin and Wyoming yesterday introduced the “War on Wolves Act,” a companion bill to legislation introduced last week in the House that would strip federal protections from wolves and allow trophy hunting and trapping of the species in four states.

If the legislation passes both chambers and gets signed by the president, it would hand the fate of wolves in Minnesota, Michigan, Wisconsin and Wyoming over to states whose management wolf plans two federal courts ruled inadequate to securing the species at legally required population levels in absence of Endangered Species Act protections.

In Wyoming, this would allow the state to resume a hostile management program that allowed for unlimited shoot-on-sight killing of wolves across 85 percent of the state. The legislation would further strip citizens of the right to challenge these lethal programs in court. The appeals process of two federal court decisions that restored federal protections to wolves in those four states are still underway. Decisions on those cases are expected any day.

The following is a statement from Marjorie Mulhall, Senior Legislative Counsel at Earthjustice:

“A new congress has resurfaced an old vendetta against imperiled wolves. If this legislation is signed into law, wolves in Wyoming will be subjected to unregulated killing across the vast majority of the state, and even on the borders of Yellowstone National Park numerous legal loopholes will authorize widespread wolf killing
.

Americans widely hailed the return of wolves to the Northern Rockies two decades ago as a triumph of the Endangered Species Act, but now this ‘War on Wolves Act’ would allow for the same unregulated killing that nearly wiped out the species in the first place.
Politicians should not meddle in the science-based listing status of a particular species at any stage, but now is an especially bad time as these cases are still playing out in the courts. We urge those who support the protection of wolves to call their senators and representatives and tell them to vote down this lethal legislation.”

Source

Plants talk to each other using an internet of fungus


 

It’s an information superhighway that speeds up interactions between a large, diverse population of individuals. It allows individuals who may be widely separated to communicate and help each other out. But it also allows them to commit new forms of crime.

No, we’re not talking about the internet, we’re talking about fungi. While mushrooms might be the most familiar part of a fungus, most of their bodies are made up of a mass of thin threads, known as a mycelium. We now know that these threads act as a kind of underground internet, linking the roots of different plants. That tree in your garden is probably hooked up to a bush several metres away, thanks to mycelia.

The more we learn about these underground networks, the more our ideas about plants have to change. They aren’t just sitting there quietly growing. By linking to the fungal network they can help out their neighbours by sharing nutrients and information – or sabotage unwelcome plants by spreading toxic chemicals through the network. This “wood wide web”, it turns out, even has its own version of cybercrime.

The mycelium of a fungus spreading through soil (Credit: Nigel Cattlin / Alamy)

The mycelium of a fungus spreading through soil (Credit: Nigel Cattlin / Alamy)

Around 90% of land plants are in mutually-beneficial relationships with fungi. The 19th-century German biologist Albert Bernard Frank coined the word “mycorrhiza” to describe these partnerships, in which the fungus colonises the roots of the plant.

Fungi have been called ‘Earth’s natural internet’

In mycorrhizal associations, plants provide fungi with food in the form of carbohydrates. In exchange, the fungi help the plants suck up water, and provide nutrients like phosphorus and nitrogen, via their mycelia. Since the 1960s, it has been clear that mycorrhizae help individual plants to grow.

Fungal networks also boost their host plants’ immune systems. That’s because, when a fungus colonises the roots of a plant, it triggers the production of defense-related chemicals. These make later immune system responses quicker and more efficient, a phenomenon called “priming”. Simply plugging in to mycelial networks makes plants more resistant to disease.

But that’s not all. We now know that mycorrhizae also connect plants that may be widely separated. Fungus expert Paul Stamets called them “Earth’s natural internet” in a 2008 TED talk. He first had the idea in the 1970s when he was studying fungi using an electron microscope. Stamets noticed similarities between mycelia and ARPANET, the US Department of Defense’s early version of the internet.

Film fans might be reminded of James Cameron’s 2009 blockbuster Avatar. On the forest moon where the movie takes place, all the organisms are connected. They can communicate and collectively manage resources, thanks to “some kind of electrochemical communication between the roots of trees“. Back in the real world, it seems there is some truth to this.

Avatar: surprisingly accurate when it comes to trees (Credit: Photos 12 / Alamy)

Avatar: surprisingly accurate when it comes to trees (Credit: Photos 12 / Alamy)

It has taken decades to piece together what the fungal internet can do. Back in 1997, Suzanne Simard of the University of British Columbia in Vancouver found one of the first pieces of evidence. She showed that Douglas fir and paper birch trees can transfer carbon between them via mycelia. Others have since shown that plants can exchange nitrogen and phosphorus as well, by the same route.

These plants are not really individuals

Simard now believes large trees help out small, younger ones using the fungal internet. Without this help, she thinks many seedlings wouldn’t survive. In the 1997 study, seedlings in the shade – which are likely to be short of food – got more carbon from donor trees.

“These plants are not really individuals in the sense that Darwin thought they were individuals competing for survival of the fittest,” says Simard in the 2011 documentary Do Trees Communicate? “In fact they are interacting with each other, trying to help each other survive.”

However, it is controversial how useful these nutrient transfers really are. “We certainly know it happens, but what is less clear is the extent to which it happens,” says Lynne Boddy of Cardiff University in the UK.

Tomato plants can receive signals from their neighbours (Credit: Tracy Gunn / Alamy)

Tomato plants can receive signals from their neighbours (Credit: Tracy Gunn / Alamy)

While that argument rages on, other researchers have found evidence that plants can go one better, and communicate through the mycelia. In 2010, Ren Sen Zeng of South China Agricultural University in Guangzhou found that when plants are attached by harmful fungi, they release chemical signals into the mycelia that warn their neighbours.

Tomato plants can ‘eavesdrop’ on defense responses

Zeng’s team grew pairs of tomato plants in pots. Some of the plants were allowed to form mycorrhizae.

Once the fungal networks had formed, the leaves of one plant in each pair were sprayed with Alternaria solani, a fungus that causes early blight disease. Air-tight plastic bags were used to prevent any above-ground chemical signalling between the plants.

After 65 hours, Zeng tried to infect the second plant in each pair. He found they were much less likely to get blight, and had significantly lower levels of damage when they did, if they had mycelia.

We suggest that tomato plants can ‘eavesdrop’ on defense responses and increase their disease resistance against potential pathogen,” Zeng and his colleagues wrote. So not only do the mycorrhizae allow plants to share food, they help them defend themselves.

Pea aphids eat broad bean plants (Credit: Bildagentur-online / McPhoto-Weber / Alamy)

Pea aphids eat broad bean plants (Credit: Bildagentur-online / McPhoto-Weber / Alamy)

It’s not just tomatoes that do this. In 2013 David Johnson of the University of Aberdeen and his colleagues showed that broad beans also use fungal networks to pick up on impending threats – in this case, hungry aphids.

Johnson found that broad bean seedlings that were not themselves under attack by aphids, but were connected to those that were via fungal mycelia, activated their anti-aphid chemical defenses. Those without mycelia did not.

“Some form of signalling was going on between these plants about herbivory by aphids, and those signals were being transported through mycorrhizal mycelial networks,” says Johnson.

The internet is also a haven for criminals and pirates (Credit: shotstock / Alamy)

The internet is also a haven for criminals and pirates (Credit: shotstock / Alamy)

But just like the human internet, the fungal internet has a dark side. Our internet undermines privacy and facilitates serious crime – and frequently, allows computer viruses to spread. In the same way, plants’ fungal connections mean they are never truly alone, and that malevolent neighbours can harm them.

For one thing, some plants steal from each other using the internet. There are plants that don’t have chlorophyll, so unlike most plants they cannot produce their own energy through photosynthesis. Some of these plants, such as the phantom orchid, get the carbon they need from nearby trees, via the mycelia of fungi that both are connected to.

Other orchids only steal when it suits them. These “mixotrophs” can carry out photosynthesis, but they also “steal” carbon from other plants using the fungal network that links them.

That might not sound too bad. However, plant cybercrime can be much more sinister than a bit of petty theft.

A phantom orchid (Cephalanthera austiniae) (Credit: Tom Hilton, CC by 2.0)

A phantom orchid (Cephalanthera austiniae) (Credit: Tom Hilton, CC by 2.0)

Plants have to compete with their neighbours for resources like water and light. As part of that battle, some release chemicals that harm their rivals.

This “allelopathy” is quite common in trees, including acacias, sugarberries, American sycamores and several species of Eucalyptus. They release substances that either reduce the chances of other plants becoming established nearby, or reduce the spread of microbes around their roots.

Sceptical scientists doubt that allelopathy helps these unfriendly plants much. Surely, they say, the harmful chemicals would be absorbed by soil, or broken down by microbes, before they could travel far.

But maybe plants can get around this problem, by harnessing underground fungal networks that cover greater distances. In 2011, chemical ecologist Kathryn Morris and her colleagues set out to test this theory.

Marigolds are distinctly unfriendly to their neighbours (Credit: blickwinkel / Alamy)

Marigolds are distinctly unfriendly to their neighbours (Credit: blickwinkel / Alamy)

Morris, formerly Barto, grew golden marigolds in containers with mycorrhizal fungi. The pots contained cylinders surrounded by a mesh, with holes small enough to keep roots out but large enough to let in mycelia. Half of these cylinders were turned regularly to stop fungal networks growing in them.

The team tested the soil in the cylinders for two compounds made by the marigolds, which can slow the growth of other plants and kill nematode worms. In the cylinders where the fungi were allowed to grow, levels of the two compounds were 179% and 278% higher than in cylinders without fungi. That suggests the mycelia really did transport the toxins.

The team then grew lettuce seedlings in the soil from both sets of containers. After 25 days, those grown in the more toxin-rich soil weighed 40% less than those in soil isolated from the mycelia. “These experiments show the fungal networks can transport these chemicals in high enough concentrations to affect plant growth,” says Morris, who is now based at Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio.

In response, some have argued that the chemicals might not work as well outside the lab. So Michaela Achatz of the Berlin Free University in Germany and her colleagues looked for a similar effect in the wild.

A black walnut tree (Juglans nigra) (Credit: foto-zone / Alamy)

A black walnut tree (Juglans nigra) (Credit: foto-zone / Alamy)

One of the best-studied examples of allelopathy is the American black walnut tree. It inhibits the growth of many plants, including staples like potatoes and cucumbers, by releasing a chemical called jugalone from its leaves and roots.

Achatz and her team placed pots around walnut trees, some of which fungal networks could penetrate. Those pots contained almost four times more jugalone than pots that were rotated to keep out fungal connections. The roots of tomato seedlings planted in the jugalone-rich soil weighed on average 36% less.

Some especially crafty plants might even alter the make-up of nearby fungal communities. Studies have shown that spotted knapweed, slender wild oat and soft brome can all change the fungal make-up of soils. According to Morris, this might allow them to better target rival species with toxic chemicals, by favouring the growth of fungi to which they can both connect.

Animals might also exploit the fungal internet. Some plants produce compounds to attract friendly bacteria and fungi to their roots, but these signals can be picked up by insects and worms looking for tasty roots to eat. In 2012, Morris suggested that the movement of these signalling chemicals through fungal mycelia may inadvertently advertise the plants presence to these animals. However, she says this has not been demonstrated in an experiment.

Trees and other plants are linked underground (Credit: All Canada Photos / Alamy)

Trees and other plants are linked underground (Credit: All Canada Photos / Alamy)

As a result of this growing body of evidence, many biologists have started using the term “wood wide web” to describe the communications services that fungi provide to plants and other organisms.

“These fungal networks make communication between plants, including those of different species, faster, and more effective,” says Morris. “We don’t think about it because we can usually only see what is above ground. But most of the plants you can see are connected below ground, not directly through their roots but via their mycelial connections.”

The fungal internet exemplifies one of the great lessons of ecology: seemingly separate organisms are often connected, and may depend on each other. “Ecologists have known for some time that organisms are more interconnected and interdependent,” says Boddy. The wood wide web seems to be a crucial part of how these connections form.

Florida recruits ‘snake hunters’ in failing war against the Burmese python


Jenny Staletovich
Miami Herald
Wed, 08 Mar 2017 18:28 UTC

© JENNY STALETOVICH
Wildlife officers (left to right) James Bales, Sergio Najera, and Alexis Del Los Santos captured a 15-foot female Burmese python on Monday. The female was breeding with four other males — scientists call it a breeding ball — when the officers found her. They shot the female and two of the males. The other two escaped.

South Florida water managers may amp up the state’s failing war against the Burmese python with a new weapon: a paid python posse.

On Thursday, the South Florida Water Management District will consider a proposal to hire hunters, paying them by the hour, plus a bonus for every snake killed, as part of a two-month, $175,000 pilot project. Hunters would patrol only district land in Miami-Dade County, which includes the vast water conservation area where remote tree islands offer hiding places perfectly suited for the well-camouflaged snakes.

The district declined to provide more details until after the presentation is made to the governing board.

Controlling the pythons has vexed biologists and wildlife officers who have been outgunned by the slithery invaders, which can lay clutches of up to 50 eggs at a time. The snakes started turning up in the marshes, either dumped by unhappy owners or escapees from breeding facilities, in the 1980s, and by about 2000 were firmly established. In September, state wildlife officers confirmed that pythons had also spread to the Keys after they found hatchlings for the first time.

Over the years, biologists have tested a variety of strategies to contain the snakes, including releasing females outfitted with radio trackers to act as ‘Judas’ snakes, snake-sniffing dogs and an iPhone app that lets people immediately report a snake sighting. This past year, the state hired a pair of Irula tribesmen, whose ancestors helped hunt pythons to extinction in India, to track down snakes. And, while it failed to significantly reduce the number of snakes and was largely meant to enlighten the public, the state’s Python Challenge drew the most attention, with headlines around the world.

The district also happens to employ one of the state’s most prolific snake slayers, Bob Hill, who has killed hundreds of pythons since 2004.

Paying hunters to rid the conservation area of snakes is something that the Miccosukee Tribe, which has a perpetual lease on the land and uses the area for hunting and other cultural purposes, has long sought.

“The only way we are going to solve this problem is with the public help. Of course there will need to be strict controls on access. But I think it’s a great idea,” Truman Duncan, the tribe’s water resources director, wrote in an email. “Our Wildlife Officers only patrol Tribal lands. That leaves the majority of the Everglades with very little protection.”

In January, the tribe’s research coordinator surprised area scientists by saying the tribe was banning all research on its land because the tribe considered the snakes sacred. He told the Miami Herald that a change in leadership led to the decision. But last week, during a meeting of a district advisory committee, Duncan said the claim was untrue and that the coordinator had been let go.

“They are not sacred. The instructions are we are to kill them, not study them,” he said.

The tribe, Duncan said, will now only allow research on its land that does not require releasing snakes. In the last month, tribal wildlife officers have killed as many 10 snakes, including a 15-foot female discovered Monday wrapped in a ‘mating ball’ with four males. Officers killed the female and two of the males, but the other two escaped.

“They’re breeding, that’s the problem,” Duncan said at the meeting. “So kill them, don’t study them.”

https://sott.net/en344683

 

Fukushima: First Images Emerge Of Radioactive Salmon In Canada


Bad news for everyone – the first radioactive salmon was found in British Columbia, Canada and there are pictures to prove it. After it was revealed that over a third of the world’s oceans were contaminated from the Fukushima rector’s explosion, a team of researchers from the University of Victoria started investigating and were shocked to find the radioactive samples of salmon. The US west coast is also contaminated and traces of seaborne Cesium 123 (the indicator of Fukushima nuclear contamination) were detected in the ocean waters.first-images-emerge-of-radioactive-salmon-in-canada

Environews reports: WHOI is a crowd-funded science seawater sampling project, which has been monitoring the radioactive plume making its way across the Pacific to America’s west coast, from the demolished Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in eastern Japan.

The researchers collected samples from the shores of Tillamook Bay and Gold Beach in January and February last year and conducted tests which revealed traces of radioactive Cesium 123.

After more and more reports of contamination started appearing everything was clear, it was just a matter of time when the sea life will become contaminated as well. Last month researchers at the Fukushima InFORM project in Canada led by University of Victoria chemical oceanographer Jay Cullen tested several samples of sockeye salmon from Okanagan Lake in British Columbia and the results came positive for Cesium 134.

But this isn’t the first reported case of contamination far from the waters in Fukushima. There have been numerous reports, mostly published in alternative media outlets but there haven’t been any tangible data that indicate radioactive contamination of salmon in Canada thus far.

It’s not a surprise if we consider the fact that contamination from the Fukushima explosion reached the coasts of US and Canada within days of the explosion, and who knows where else it has circled, influenced by tides and currents. Radioactive iodine 131 was also found in municipal water supplies in places like Pennsylvania and Massachusetts shortly after the initial Fukushima explosion.

According to the tests, the samples from the Oregon coast measured around 0.3 becquerels per cubic meter for cesium 134.This level of radiation was deemed safe and “not a risk to humans or the environment”  by multiple researchers in both the US and Canada. And as with everything else, the cover up was successful since all major media outlets like NBC, the New York Post, USA Today, and even The Inquisitr conveyed their opinion and reported there’s nothing for us to worry. But we should know better – there’s no such thing as safe amount of radiation for living organisms! Every exposure to radiation, no matter how small, increases our risk for cancer and other serious medical conditions!

Source:

http://www.neonnettle.com

People Want To Shoot Hibernating Bear Families — And The Government Just Voted To Let Them


“What the House did today should shock the conscience of every animal lover in America.”

Mother bears hibernating with their cubs and wolves raising pups in their dens may no longer be protected from a hunter’s rifle.

The lives of countless bear and wolf families are hanging in the balance today because the U.S. House of Representatives just voted to overturn a ban on cruel hunting tactics that previously protected animals on some of the most treasured wildlife refuges in America.

Grizzly bear family in AlaskaShutterstock

On 76 million acres of federal refuges in Alaska, hunters will be permitted to enter dens where vulnerable bear families are hibernating and kill them if the resolution becomes law. They will also be able to shoot entire wolf families raising young pups if the Senate and President agree with the vote.

“What the House did today should shock the conscience of every animal lover in America,” Wayne Pacelle, president and CEO of The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), said on Thursday. “If the Senate and President concur, we’ll see wolf families killed in their dens, bears chased down by planes or suffering for hours in barbaric steel-jawed traps or snares.”

The overturning of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) ban would also allow hunters to lure animals with food and shoot them at point-blank range.

Wolf pups playing near their denShutterstock

Even people in favor of hunting applauded the ban when it was issued. “Inhumane hunting methods have caused the overkilling of native Alaskan predators; this rule takes a balanced approach allowing for traditional, permit-based hunting,” then-Representative Mike Fitzpatrick (R-PA) said last year after the cruel practices were banned.

Grizzly bear by a denShutterstock

Now it’s unclear why the push to overturn the ban was introduced in the first place, as a 2016 poll of Alaska voters showed that most agreed that those practices should be banned. Alaska’s Representative Don Young (R-AK), who has trapped animals in the past, introduced the measure, known as H.J. Resolution 69, anyway.

Congress voted 225 to 193 in favor of it on Thursday, some citing states’ rights as the reason for their vote in favor, despite the resolution being about federal lands.

Wolf pup emerging from denShutterstock

“Special interest groups are quietly working at the federal and state level to lay the groundwork for federally managed lands to be handed over wholesale to state or even private ownership,” Dan Ashe, then-FWS director, wrote last year in an op-ed. “Unfortunately, without the protections of federal law and the public engagement it ensures, this heritage is incredibly vulnerable.”

Shutterstock

The Dodo asked Rep. Young for a comment as to why he would push to allow these practices when so many voters oppose them. His office did not immediately respond.

There’s still time to save wolves and bears from cruelty: Contact your senators and ask them to vote against this resolution.

https://www.thedodo.com/us-house-alaska-bear-wolf-2268102226.html

1000’s of “SPOOKED” birds decend on interstate highway PACKED w/cars! | *Fearing the Sky* ~ MrMBB333


Note: In addition to his hypothesis, the birds could’ve been reacting to a magnetic disturbance, earth frequency’s from a shift in the plates cosmic energy, a cloaked craft in the sky or any number of anomalies. The appeared to be crows too.

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January 24, 2017: A massive flock of thousands of disoriented birds land on a busy interstate during rush hour traffic in Houston. Many birds landed on the roadside risking the cars opposed to what had them spooked that WAS IN THE SKY. Birds were even hitting cars windshields as you will see in the video. #birds,#houston,#tornadoes

https://weather.com/storms/tornado/ne…

Villagers knit jumpers for Indian elephants to protect the large mammals from near-freezing temperatures


Local women make colourful jumpers for formerly abused animals after staff at conservation centre warn of temperatures dipping close to freezing point

The Independent Online

Elephants in India are sporting colourful woollen jumpers after villagers knitted the super-size garments to protect the animals from near-freezing temperatures.

Women in a village near the Wildlife SOS Elephant Conservation and Care Centre in the northern city of Mathura reportedly began producing the colourful, pyjama-like garments after staff at the centre warned temperatures were approaching sub-zero at night.

The conservation centre takes in rescued elephants who have previously suffered chronic neglect and beatings from cruel handlers.

Photographs show female elephants wearing the carefully embroidered outfits, which cover their legs, back and neck, as centre staff and villagers stand among them.

Kartick Satyanarayan, founder of the centre, said it was important to protect the formerly abused elephants from the cold.

“It is important to keep our elephants protected from the bitter cold during this extreme winter, as they are weak and vulnerable having suffered so much abuse making them susceptible to ailments such as pneumonia,” she told the Times of India.

“The cold also aggravates their arthritis which is a common issue that our rescued elephants have to deal with.”

The centre currently houses 20 elephants that have been rescued from illegal captivity, trafficking mafia, exploited for street begging and circuses where they were abused and subjected to extreme cruelty.

Link: SEE PHOTO Gallery

Mother Whale Lifting Her Baby to See Humans on Boat


Mother Whale and Calf with people on whale watching trip. Very cool to see the Momma raising her Baby to show it the funny looking humans! Like a revers Zoo, were the people out to see the Whales, or was the Momma Whale teaching her baby about humans? The big momma Whale held her baby on her back to raise it high enough for the humans to pet it, and for it to get a good look at the humans.

Esoteric Crows and Mystical Ravens


Although crows and ravens are part of the same family called Corvus, they’re not exactly the same bird. Typically, ravens are quite a bit bigger than crows, and they tend to be a bit shaggier looking. Both crows and ravens have appeared in a number of different mythologies throughout the ages. In some cases these black-feathered birds are considered an omen of bad tidings, but in others they may represent a message from the Divine.

In Celtic mythology, the warrior goddess known as the Morrighan is often seen accompanied by a group of birds, or appears in the form of a crow or raven. The Native Americans usually, but not always, considered the raven as a trickster, much like Coyote, and in the legends causes mischief and are seen as a symbol of transformation. Some tribes knew the raven as a stealer of souls.

Eagles Destroy Corporate Drones, Cost Mining Company More Than $100,000


Drones owned by one of the world’s largest gold mining companies are being destroyed by native eagles, costing the company thousands of dollars.

wedgieeagle

Mining is one of the most destructive forces currently on the face of the planet. Mines, since the Industrial Era, have poisoned the environment and its workers alike. Gold mining is particularly destructive as its waste carries mercury and cyanide, which are typically used to extract gold from rock. These potent neurotoxins persist in the environment, poisoning the soil, and contaminate water supplies permanently. Gold mining also releases hundreds of tons of elemental mercury into the air annually. In addition, this type of mining is considered particularly destructive because of its wastefulness – over 20 tons of rock and soil must be “treated” and then dislodged to produce enough gold for a single ring. Recently, in the US, the toxic consequences of gold mining were on full display when the Environmental Protection Agency’s incompetence in cleaning out an abandoned gold mine turned the Animas river orange after heavy metal-laden mining waste drained into the river. Before this tragic accident, the EPA had reported that 40% of Western US watersheds had been permanently contaminated by mining.

camodrone

Now that gold mining is not as common as it once was in the US, many other countries have been exploited by gold mining firms in its absence. One of these countries is Australia. Mining in Australia is a major industry with gold mining in Western Australia alone generating over $10 billion every year. However, some of the gold mines there have been experiencing a costly and unexpected problem as nature has apparently decided to fight back against its incursions. Drones that are used to survey the territory around gold mines are being destroyed by native wedge-tailed eagles. Rick Steven, a mine surveyor in the region, said that he had lost nine of his Trimble UX5 drones to eagles, which he labeled “the natural enemy” of drones. After the attacks began, Steven camouflaged his drones as baby eagles. However, the ruse only worked temporarily as 50 flights later the eagles realized the disguised drones were not what they seemed. Each of these drones costs an impressive $20,000, meaning that gold mining companies are losing money fast thanks to the eagles’ intervention. One of these companies, Gold Fields, has already lost over $100,000.

This isn’t the first case of animals fighting back against the degradation of the environment in recent months. Less than a month ago, a herd of wild buffalo appeared out of nowhere in a seeming show of support to the Native Americans and their allies protesting the Dakota Access pipeline. The buffalo, who are considered sacred by the Sioux tribe, appeared by the thousands in a stampede that interrupted a confrontation between protestors and police. After the event, many speculated that the buffalo had appeared to show their solidarity with the protestors and indicated that nature was fighting back against exploitative corporate practices. Hopefully, these acts of defiance from the natural world will inspire people to follow their lead in taking a stand against the corporations destroying the planet.

What are your thoughts? Please comment below and share this news!


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How to Tell a Raven From a Crow


These black birds may look similar in some ways, but several distinctive traits help set them apart.

This story comes to you through a partnership between Audubon and BirdNote, a show that airs daily on public radio stations nationwide.

Go here to hear the podcast

You’re outside, enjoying a sunny day when a shadow at your feet causes you to look up.  A large, black bird flies over and lands in a nearby tree. You wonder: is that a crow or a raven?

These two species, Common Ravens and American Crows, overlap widely throughout North America, and they look quite similar. But with a bit of practice, you can tell them apart.

You probably know that ravens are larger, the size of a Red-tailed Hawk. Ravens often travel in pairs, while crows are seen in larger groups. Also, watch the bird’s tail as it flies overhead. The crow’s tail feathers are basically the same length, so when the bird spreads its tail, it opens like a fan. Ravens, however, have longer middle feathers in their tails, so their tail appears wedge-shaped when open.

Listen closely to the birds’ calls. Crows give a cawing sound. But ravens produce a lower croaking sound.

We’re back looking up at that tree. Now can you tell? Is this an American Crow or a Common Raven?

That’s a raven. The bird calls you hear on BirdNote come from the Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. To hear them again, begin with a visit to our website, BirdNote.org. I’m Michael Stein.

American Crow. Photo: Brian Kushner

Adapted by Dennis Paulson from a script written by Frances Wood.
Calls provided by The Macaulay Library of Natural Sounds at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York. Ambient track American Raven recorded by R.S. Little, American Crow recorded by G.A. Keller.
Forest ambient and featured raven recorded by C. Peterson
Producer: John Kessler
Executive Producer: Chris Peterson
© 2012 Tune In to Nature.org     September 2012     Narrator: Michael Stein

 

http://www.audubon.org/news/how-tell-raven-crow

 

 

Native American tribes in Canada, U.S. to sign treaty to protect Yellowstone grizzlies


U.S. and Canada-based Native American tribes are expected to sign a treaty on Friday that urges protections be maintained for grizzly bears in and around Yellowstone National Park.

The treaty is the latest sign of growing American Indian activism tied to tribal rights and the environment, and just the third such cross-border agreement in 150 years, tribal members involved said.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said earlier this year that Yellowstone-area grizzlies had come back from the brink of extinction and it proposed stripping U.S. Endangered Species Act protections from the population of about 700 bears.

The move would open the way for hunting bears that roam outside the park’s borders in Wyoming, Montana and Idaho.

The treaty, expected to be signed by Piikani Nation and other tribes in the western Canadian province of Alberta on Friday, declares support by more than 50 tribes for protecting grizzlies from random killing and preserving their habitat against development.

The planned ceremony comes two days before representatives of other tribes mostly in and around the U.S. Rocky Mountain West are expected to sign the same treaty during a ceremony in Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming.

The Canada-based tribes are signing the measure to show solidarity with tribes based in the United States, as they are all united by cultural and religious ties to grizzlies.

Chief Stanley Grier of the Piikani Nation and representatives from such tribes as the Blackfeet Nation in Montana and the Shoshone-Bannock of eastern Idaho, argue grizzlies are too sacred and culturally important to be killed by hunters.

“There should be no doubt that delisting and trophy hunting the grizzly bear on ancestral tribal and treaty lands threatens irreparable harm to those sites and to tribal sovereignty and religious freedom,” Grier said.

Tribal members also say the U.S. government failed to engage in “meaningful consultation” before decisions were made about delisting grizzlies.

Serena Baker, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, said the agency had sought since 2014 to reach out to about 50 tribes – through letters, phone calls and emails – about Yellowstone grizzlies.

“The service has and is continuing to offer government-to-government consultation with Native American tribes west of the Mississippi,” she said on Thursday.
 Source

Homesick Dog Escapes From Shelter Trying To Unite With Previous Owner


Security video caught Ginger, the German shepherd, climbing to the top of her kennel and breaking free.

“Everybody believes she was trying to make her way back to her old owner because she was found close to where her old home was,” the shelter’s manager Gina Whiteside said.

Ginger busted out only a few hours after her former owner dropped her off at the shelter because he could no longer take care of her.

The 2-year-old dog opened three doors to get out, left teeth marks on a door handle and proof that where there’s a will, there’s a way.

“As she was coming out he door, what we saw is this quick little glance back at the shelter saying: ‘See ya!’ ” Whiteside said.

During Ginger’s great escape, she set off the shelter’s motion sensors, which alerted security.

“The staff came in. There were phones off the counter. Everything was kind of messed up,” Whiteside said.

That was because Ginger jumped onto the counter and stopped to pose for the camera.

“We just want to honor the owner’s wishes. It was difficult for him to turn her in and make that decision. Now, our job is to find her a home that’s going to be permanent,” Whiteside added.
Source

 VIDEO

http://www.whitewolfpack.com/

A River of Waste: The Hazardous Truth About Factory Farms


A heart-stopping new documentary, A RIVER OF WASTE exposes a huge health and environmental scandal in our modern industrial system of meat and poultry production. Some scientists have gone so far as to call the condemned current factory farm practices as “mini Chernobyls.” In the U.S. and elsewhere, the meat and poultry industry is dominated by dangerous uses of arsenic, antibiotics, growth hormones and by the dumping of massive amounts of sewage in fragile waterways and environments. The film documents the vast catastrophic impact on the environment and public health as well as focuses on the individual lives damaged and destroyed.

Andrew Bartzis – Animal Allies – Spirit Healers, Dreamtime Guardians and Voices For The Animal Hive Universe


Note: Mind-blowing information from Andrew Bartzis, Galactic HIstorian on our brothers and sisters from the animal kingdom, on their purpose as companion spirit’s and the healing/teaching/protection they bring to our lives. In-joy! {~A~}

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Animals have played a big part in the lives of people as far back as there are records, no doubt long before that. As the short clip included from Michael Tsarion illustrates, Andrew shares relative to their pureness of which is KNOWN. The awareness of the depth of relationship, however I would forward to be an aspect of our Race Amnesia Andrew talks about often. Which, as usual he adds dimensions to the nature of their role in one’s life. With the context to what Andrew shares here, I know I have been in the presence of such relationships. I hope it also clarifies to you what you may not have perceived until now yourself. And, the amazing things occurring all around all the time…..

Also include:

Animal Allies physical traits from being in Psychic Battles Protecting the Sacred Space of Bonded Human, Animal Healers, Taking on Burdens, Reciprocation of their Love and need for it, The importance of Communication, The use of Crystals for their Defence, Energy Hygiene, Sacred Feminine Warrior, Soul Connection through Lifetimes, Animal Teachers, Astral Animal Spirit Warriors, Dream Lodge, Moon Lodge, Soul Groups inc Animal Spirits, Animal Council Spirit Teachers, Region Totem Protector, Animal Community Ambassadors, Animal Hive Universe, Unified Dreamtime and much much more…..Enjoy

Clip – ‘1 Am Number Four’ – Touchstone Pictures

After uproar, U.S. government says does not plan to kill wild horses


By Alex Dobuzinskis

The U.S. government said on Wednesday it has no plans to euthanize a large share of the more than 45,000 wild horses and burros removed from lands mostly in the U.S. West, after an advisory panel’s proposal to kill some of the animals sparked outrage.

U.S. Bureau of Land Management officials said they struggle to find people to adopt the growing number of wild horses and burros, which costs the agency millions annually to maintain in corrals and pasturelands.

The National Wild Horse and Burro Advisory Board on Friday recommended the bureau consider euthanizing the animals that cannot be adopted, or selling them to companies that might slaughter them.

But Tom Gorey, a spokesman for the bureau, said in an email that the agency will “continue its current policy of caring for unadopted or unsold wild horses and burros” and will “not sell or send any animals to slaughter.”

File photo of several wild horses escaping as a helicopter is used by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to gather horses into a trap south of Garrison, Utah © REUTERS/Jim Urquhart/File Photo File photo of several wild horses escaping as a helicopter is used by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to gather horses into a trap south of Garrison, Utah The bureau is expected to formally respond to the panel at its next meeting within months.

The panel’s recommendation created an uproar among animal rights activists and highlighted the challenges ahead for the U.S. government as it seeks to control the population of wild horses and burros.

Gillian Lyons, wild horse and burro program manager for the Humane Society of the United States, said members of the public were quick to criticize the idea of killing the wild animals.

“It’s something the American public just doesn’t know about, you don’t think of wild horses being held in facilities all across the United States,” Lyons said.

She added that the bureau has a responsibility to the animals because it captured them.

Even after decades of round-ups of wild horses and burros, 67,000 of these animals roam the United States, mostly in Nevada and California, according to government estimates.

Without natural predators, they have proliferated far beyond the roughly 27,000 animals the U.S. government says would be a population low enough to prevent overgrazing and preserve land for other animals.

The bureau spends nearly $50 million a year in upkeep for captured horses and burros, Gorey said.

The Humane Society alleges the bureau spends so much paying private contractors to hold the animals that it cannot afford to expand its program to administer birth control to the animals on the range, which it contends would be more effective for population control than round-ups.

But the bureau counters fertility control is difficult, in part because the birth control drug wears off in less than two years.

(Reporting by Alex Dobuzinskis in Los Angeles; Editing by Marguerita Choy)

 

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/after-uproar-us-government-says-does-not-plan-to-kill-wild-horses/ar-BBwaryz

Truly remarkable! Bird revived back to LIFE by another bird


This is the heart-warming moment a stubborn bird saved his friend’s life by trying to revive it after it hit a window.
The scene, filmed in Saudi Arabia, was posted on LiveLeak by a baffled eyewitness.
It shows a nervous robin slapping its wings as he tries to give its pal – who lies unconscious on its back – the ‘kiss of life’ to revive it.
It is believed the other robin was knocked out by flying into a glass window.
The generous bird does not give up on his friend’s life and keeps stroking it with its beak – but the robin does not move and lies on its back unconscious.
The first bird then changes tactics and tries to move the fallen robin to turn it around.
Finally, slowly, the bird starts flapping its wings and regains consciousness.
The last peck sends the injured bird flying, followed by his saviour.

Firefighters Dig Until Dawn to Rescue Underground Dog


Could it be that when you name a dog “Tiger” you can expect him to be especially territorial? Well, perhaps that’s why this dog in Gulfport, Miss., decided to race down the street in pursuit of a neighborhood cat. Only problem is, there’s something just as dangerous as quicksand in the concrete “jungle” and it swallowed poor Tiger just as quickly.

Credit: Chris Henderson of Gulfport Fire Department/ Facebook

Tiger fell deep into a concrete culvert pipe near the intersection of Mississippi Avenue and Tyler Street around 9 p.m. one evening, and it wasn’t until residents exhausted their own resources that they decided to call for help at around 3 a.m. the next morning.

Credit: Chris Henderson of Gulfport Fire Department/ Facebook

Gulfport Fire Department Battalion Chief Chris Henderson, along with seven other firefighters and a pair of workers from the public works department, began working together to extricate the dog.

Credit: Chris Henderson of Gulfport Fire Department/ Facebook

It was a tedious rescue because the pipe was far too narrow for any rescue worker to fit through, so the team had to cut their way through the pipe.

Credit: Chris Henderson of Gulfport Fire Department/ Facebook

“We counted the joints in the pipe to estimate the distance, then walked off the distance on the top above the ground,” Henderson told the local ABC News affiliate.

Credit: Chris Henderson of Gulfport Fire Department/ Facebook

The firefighters dug down and then drilled holes to locate Tiger before bringing in a concrete saw to cut through the pipe and reach him.

Credit: Chris Henderson of Gulfport Fire Department/ Facebook

By 7 a.m. Tiger was pulled to safety and reunited with his guardian who planned to take him to the veterinarian as a precautionary measure although the dog appeared unharmed.

Credit: Chris Henderson of Gulfport Fire Department/ Facebook

http://www.care2.com/causes/firefighters-dig-until-dawn-to-rescue-underground-dog.html

Here, The Visitors Are In Cages & The Animals Roam Free


Note: Novel idea! It’s about time we gave wildlife a chance to gawk and poke fun at ie: “Save the Human’s”… Love it! ❤

 
zoo-in-china-700x443

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By Alex Erickson,

Why do we go to the zoo? To see animals we’d never imagine coming across in our day-to-day lives wander about, eating, rolling around, and looking cute for our amazement. At least that’s what I get out of it.

As a child, I wanted to hear the trumpets of elephants, the roars of lions and tigers, the chatter of monkeys. I wanted to watch a giraffe walk elegantly about, its long neck stretching high and far for food.

I wanted to marvel at the incredible array of colours on the seemingly endless species of birds. What a beautiful thing to be able to see so many animals from all over the world in my hometown.

But long before I understood the downsides of many zoos, I wondered if the animals were happy. Maybe it was because I’d seen Free Willy too many times, or maybe it was because I had this innate feeling that being locked up was wrong, and couldn’t possibly be a part of happiness.

Even today, sometimes I stare at my cat and wonder if she is happy. I’ve given her an accessible ‘cat door’ to wander in and out of my house between the hours of 8am and whenever nightfall hits. But she mostly sleeps.

It’s often in the middle of the night that she is more exuberant, chasing bugs as a part of her nocturnal behaviour and perhaps as a way to make up for being caged in from her desire to hunt in the outdoors. But I’m scared. I don’t want her to get eaten by coyotes, and so my protective, motherly instinct keeps my cat from being free in a way that is most important to her nature.

As an adult, when I think of zoos, I imagine caged and humiliated animals meant to serve as entertainment for humans. Zoos claim to be more than just this, however, but do we really need them? The issue is controversial, with one side believing keeping animals in captivity promotes conservation and education, and the other arguing it simply supports animal cruelty.

One thing seems clear, however: no matter how you slice it, keeping any creature, endangered or not, behind a cage is inhumane. So what is the alternative? One zoo in China found an interesting way to bring people closer to the wildlife without actually caging animals. Their tactic? Put the visitors in cages instead.

zoo in China

The Lehe Ledu Wildlife Zoo allows normally caged creatures like big cats and other wildlife species, such as bears, roam free, while visitors remain in a cage. This allows people to get extremely close without subjecting the wild creatures to the inhumanity of being trapped in small cages, like most zoos throughout the world do.

“We wanted to give our visitors the thrill of being stalked and attacked by the big cats but with, of course, none of the risks,” Zoo spokeswoman Chan Llang explained.

Chunks of meat are tied to the outside of moving cages to attract animals for the visitors. Inside the vehicles, visitors are protected from being eaten. Small openings at the top allow them to offer food to the exotic beasts.

Chan Llang says all the visitors are warned “to keep their fingers and hands inside the cage at all times because a hungry tiger wouldn’t know the difference between them and breakfast.”

Lehe Ledu Wildlife Zoo was opened in 2015, and tickets were sold out for three months, proving people actually enjoyed the idea of allowing the animals to roam freely in their natural habitats while they remained behind cages themselves.

“It’s nothing like I’ve ever experienced in a zoo before,” explained visitor Tao Jen. “We’re not looking at them, they’re looking at us – and we’re lunch.”

http://www.collective-evolution.com/2016/08/13/here-the-visitors-are-in-cages-the-animals-roam-free/

This woman swings at an elephant…Now watch what the elephant does next!


Music has a certain power to it. It can completely alter our moods, relaxing our souls, and lifting our spirits. Whether it’s parents singing to their babies or people zoning out to a tune on their music player, music can sooth and relax. But it doesn’t just work on us humans, it works on animals too! At the Elephant Nature Park in Chiang Mai, Thailand, there is a special caretaker named Lek. She shows us exactly how powerful music is for her elephants. One in particular, Faa Mai, actually zones out to the sweet sound of Lek’s beautiful singing voice. Clearly these two have an incredible bond that has really been sealed with the power of music! What an amazing sight, and what an amazing woman!
Source : enlightened-planet

Read more at http://www.theinfopost.org/2016/06/this-woman-swings-at-elephantnow-watch.html#E9Gvrd2m7yZoIi5i.99

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