McDonald’s closing all restaurants in Bolivia as nation rejects fast food


Thursday, June 13, 2013 by: Lance Johnson
Tags:

(NaturalNews) McDonald’s happy image and its golden arches aren’t the gateway to bliss in Bolivia. This South American country isn’t falling for the barrage of advertising and fast food cooking methods that so easily engulf countries like the United States. Bolivians simply don’t trust food prepared in such little time. The quick and easy, mass production method of fast food actually turns Bolivians off altogether. Sixty percent of Bolivians are an indigenous population who generally don’t find it worth their health or money to step foot in a McDonald’s. Despite its economically friendly fast food prices, McDonald’s couldn’t coax enough of the indigenous population of Bolivia to eat their BigMacs, McNuggets or McRibs.

One indigenous woman, Esther Choque, waiting for a bus to arrive outside a McDonald’s restaurant, said, “The closest I ever came was one day when a rain shower fell and I climbed the steps to keep dry by the door. Then they came out and shooed me away. They said I was dirtying the place. Why would I care if McDonald’s leaves [Bolivia]?”

Fast food chain remained for a decade, despite losses every year

The eight remaining McDonald’s fast food shops that stuck it out in the Bolivian city’s of La Paz, Cochabamba, and Santa Cruz de la Sierra, had reportedly operated on losses every year for a decade. The McDonald’s franchise had been persistent over that time, flexing its franchise’s deep pockets to continue business in Bolivia.

Any small business operating in the red for that long would have folded and left the area in less than half that time. Even as persistent as McDonald’s was in gaining influence there, it couldn’t continue operating in the red. After 14 years of presence in the country, their extensive network couldn’t hold up the Bolivian chain. Store after store shut down as Bolivia rejected the McDonald’s fast food agenda. Soon enough, they kissed the last McDonald’s goodbye.

Deep cultural rejection

The McDonald’s impact and its departure from Bolivia was so lasting and important, that marketing managers immediately filmed a documentary called, “Why McDonalds’s went broke in Bolivia.”

Featuring, cooks, nutritionist, historians, and educators, this documentary breaks down the disgusting reality of how McDonald’s food is prepared and why Bolivians reject the whole fast food philosophy of eating.

The rejection isn’t necessarily based on the taste or the type of food McDonald’s prepared. The rejection of the fast food system stemmed from Bolivian’s mindset of how meals are to be properly prepared. Bolivians more so respect their bodies, valuing the quality of what goes into their stomach. The time it takes for fast food to be prepared throws up a warning flag in their minds. Where other cultures see no risk, eating McDonald’s every week; Bolivians feel that it just isn’t worth the health risk. Bolivians seek well prepared, local meals, and want to know that their food was prepared the right way.

This self respect helps Bolivians avoid processed “restructured meat technology,” often used by fast food joints like McDonald’s.

The McRib: 70 ingredients all restructured into one

Did you know that the McRib is processed with 70 different ingredients which include azodicarbonamide, a flour-bleaching agent often used in producing foamed plastics? McRib’s are basically “restructured meat technology” containing a mixture of tripe, heart, and scalded stomach. Proteins are extracted from this muscle mixture and they bind the pork trimmings together so they can be molded in a factory. The McRib is really just a molded blob of restructured meat, advertised and sold like fresh ribs. There’s nothing real about it, the preparation or the substance. In fact, McRibs really came about because of a chicken shortage. The restructured meat technology approach kept the McRib on the menu, despite the shortage, and the profits continued rolling in.

This is the very disgusting idea that the Bolivians have rejected in their country.

The Bolivian rejection of McDonald’s has set a proper example for the rest of the world to follow.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.hispanicallyspeakingnews.com

http://www.globalresearch.ca

http://www.theblaze.com

http://www.trueactivist.com/mcdonalds-goes-belly-up-in-bolivia/

Chomsky: America’s Imperial Power Is Showing Real Signs of Decline


 

 

On July 9, the Organization of American States held a special session to discuss the shocking behavior of the European states that had refused to allow the government plane [3] carrying Bolivian President Evo Morales to enter their airspace.

Morales was flying home from a Moscow summit on July 3. In an interview there he had said he was open to offering political asylum to Edward J. Snowden, the former U.S. spy-agency contractor wanted by Washington on espionage charges, who was in the Moscow airport.

The OAS expressed its solidarity with Morales, condemned [4]“actions that violate the basic rules and principles of international law such as the inviolability of Heads of State,” and “firmly” called on the European governments – France, Italy, Portugal and Spain – to explain their actions and issue apologies.

An emergency meeting of UNASUR—the Union of South American Nations—denounced “the flagrant violation of international treaties” by European powers.

Latin American heads of state weighed in, too. President Dilma Rousseff of Brazil expressed the country’s “indignation and condemnation of the situation imposed on President Evo Morales by some European countries” and warned that this “serious lack of respect for the law…compromises dialogue between the two continents and possible negotiations between them.”

Commentators were less reserved. Argentine political scientist Atilio Boron dismissed Europe as “the whore of Babylon,” cringing before power.

With virtually identical reservations, two states refused to sign the OAS resolution [5]: the United States and Canada. Their growing isolation in the hemisphere as Latin America frees itself from the imperial yoke after 500 years is of historic significance.

Morales’ plane, reporting technical problems, was permitted to land in Austria. Bolivia charges that the plane was searched to discover whether Snowden was on board. Austria responds that “there was no formal inspection.” Whatever happened followed warnings delivered from Washington. Beyond that the story is murky.

Washington has made clear that any country that refuses to extradite Snowden will face harsh punishment. The United States will “chase him to the ends of the earth,” Sen. Lindsey Graham warned [6].

But U.S. government spokespersons assured the world that Snowden will be granted the full protection of American law – referring to those same laws that have kept U.S. Army soldier Bradley Manning (who released a vast archive of U.S. military and diplomatic documents to WikiLeaks) in prison for three years, much of it in solitary confinement under humiliating conditions. Long gone is the archaic notion of a speedy trial before a jury of peers. On July 30 a military judge found Manning guilty [7] of charges that could lead to a maximum sentence of 136 years.

Like Snowden, Manning committed the crime of revealing to Americans—and others—what their government is doing. That is a severe breach of “security” in the operative meaning of the term, familiar to anyone who has pored over declassified documents. Typically “security” means security of government officials from the prying eyes of the public to whom they are answerable—in theory.

Governments always plead security as an excuse—in the Snowden case, security from terrorist attack. This pretext comes from an administration carrying out a grand international terrorist campaign with drones and special operations forces that is generating potential terrorists at every step.

Their indignation knows no bounds at the thought that someone wanted by the United States should receive asylum in Bolivia, which has an extradition treaty with the U.S. Oddly missing from the tumult is the fact that extradition works both ways—again, in theory.

Last September, the United States rejected Bolivia’s 2008 petition to extradite former president Gonzalo Sánchez de Lozada—“Goni”—to face charges of genocide and crimes against humanity. It would, however, be an error to compare Bolivia’s request for extradition with Washington’s, even if we were to suppose that the cases have comparable merit.

The reason was provided by St. Augustine in his tale about the pirate asked by Alexander the Great, “How dare you molest the sea?” The pirate replied, “How dare you molest the whole world? Because I do it with a little ship only, I am called a thief; you, doing it with a great navy, are called an Emperor.”

St. Augustine calls the pirate’s answer “elegant and excellent.” But the ancient philosopher, a bishop in Roman Africa, is only a voice from the global South, easily dismissed. Modern sophisticates comprehend that the Emperor has rights that little folk like Bolivians cannot aspire to.

Goni is only one of many that the Emperor chooses not to extradite. Another case is that of Luis Posada Carriles, described by Peter Kornbluh, an analyst of Latin American terror, as “one of the most dangerous terrorists in recent history.”

Posada is wanted by Venezuela and Cuba for his role in the 1976 bombing of a Cubana commercial airliner, killing 73 people. The CIA and FBI identified him as a suspect. But Cubans and Venezuelans also lack the prerogatives of the Emperor, who organized and backed the reign of terror to which Cubans have been subjected since liberation.

The late Orlando Bosch, Posada’s partner in terrorism, also benefited from the Emperor’s benevolence. The Justice Department and FBI requested that he be deported as a threat to U.S. security, charging him with dozens of terrorist acts. In 1990, after President George H.W. Bushoverturned the deportation order [8], Bosch lived the rest of his life happily in Miami, undisturbed by calls for extradition by Cuba and Costa Rica, two mere pirates.

Another insignificant pirate is Italy, now seeking the extradition of 23 CIA operatives indicted for kidnapping Hassan Mustafa Osama Nasr [9], an Egyptian cleric in Milan, whom they rendered to Egypt for torture (he was later found to be innocent). Good luck, Italy.

There are other cases, but the crime of rendition returns us to the matter of Latin American independence. The Open Society Institute recently released a study called [10] “Globalizing Torture: CIA Secret Detention and Extraordinary Rendition.” It reviewed global participation in the crime, which was very broad, including among European countries.

Latin American scholar Greg Grandin pointed out that one region was absent from the list of shame: Latin America. That is doubly remarkable. Latin America had long been the reliable “backyard” for the United States. If any of the locals sought to raise their heads, they would be decapitated by terror or military coup. And as it was under U.S. control throughout the latter half of the last century, Latin America was one of the torture capitals of the world.

That’s no longer the case, as the United States and Canada are being virtually expelled from the hemisphere.

http://www.alternet.org/print/world/chomsky-americas-imperial-power-showing-real-signs-decline

 

Peru, Chile and Bolivia hit by floods





Torrential rain has been creating havoc along the Pacific coast side of South America, with flooding causing the deaths of at least six people in Peru.

In the southern city of Arequipa, thousands of people were left without electricity and drinking water.

In Bolivia, nearly 9,000 families across the country were affected by flooding, said the authorities.

A downpour in the Andean region of Chile has also led to fresh water shortages in the capital, Santiago.

Authorities say four million people were affected by the cuts to freshwater supplies caused by landslides near San Jose de Maipo.

They reportedly contaminated two rivers that supply the city’s water plants.

Aguas Andinas water company said it would start restoring the supply on Saturday night and expected to bring it back to normal by Sunday afternoon.

Last week, even Chile’s Atacama desert, one of the driest places in the world, suffered with heavy rain.

Three weeks ago, another contamination of the river Maipo left at least two thirds of the 5 million residents of the capital without water.

In Peru, authorities have declared a state of emergency in Arequipa.

The national meteorological service said that the bad weather brought down the equivalent of three months of rain in about seven hours.

“It’s a record of records. There are no records of an event of this magnitude”, the local director of the service, Sebastian Zuniga, told the Andina news agency.

At least two bodies were found in a car that submerged in the mud after a road collapsed.

More than 48,000 people are said to have been affected by the rain.

Torrential rain has also fallen over most regions in neighbouring Bolivia.

Nearly 9,000 people are said to have been affected and crops lost to the rain.

Last week, Brazil announced it would send 500 tonnes of rice to aid Bolivians hit by the natural disaster.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-21399408

http://peru21.pe/actualidad/fotos-magnitud-desastre-pluvial-arequip…
http://www.larepublica.pe/09-02-2013/asi-amanecio-arequipa-despues-…
http://www.biobiochile.cl/2013/02/09/llovizna-habria-provocado-soca…
http://www.losandesonline.cl/noticias/20683/tres-casas-y-una-sede-s…

http://poleshift.ning.com/profiles/blogs/7-of-10-s-america-roll-peru-chile-and-bolivia-hit-by-floods

 

Can Healthy Food Eaters Stomach the Uncomfortable Truth About Quinoa?


 

 

January 18, 2013  |
Quinoa is not a grass, but its seeds have been...

Quinoa is not a grass, but its seeds have been eaten for 6000 years. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Not long ago, quinoa was just an obscure Peruvian grain you could only buy in wholefood shops. We struggled to pronounce it (it’s keen-wa, not qui-no-a), yet it was feted by food lovers as a novel addition to the familiar ranks of couscous and rice. Dieticians clucked over quinoa approvingly because it ticked the low-fat box and fit in with government healthy eating advice to “base your meals on starchy foods”.

Adventurous eaters liked its slightly bitter taste and the little white curls that formed around the grains. Vegans embraced quinoa as a credibly nutritious substitute for meat. Unusual among grains, quinoa has a high protein content (between 14%-18%), and it contains all those pesky, yet essential, amino acids needed for good health that can prove so elusive to vegetarians who prefer not to pop food supplements.

Sales took off. Quinoa was, in marketing speak, the “miracle grain of the Andes”, a healthy, right-on, ethical addition to the meat avoider’s larder (no dead animals, just a crop that doesn’t feel pain). Consequently, the price shot up – it has tripled since 2006 – with more rarified black, red and “royal” types commanding particularly handsome premiums.

But there is an unpalatable truth to face for those of us with a bag of quinoa in the larder. The appetite of countries such as ours for this grain has pushed up prices to such an extent [3] that poorer people in Peru and Bolivia, for whom it was once a nourishing staple food, can no longer afford to eat it. Imported junk food is cheaper. In Lima, quinoa now costs more than chicken. Outside the cities, and fuelled by overseas demand, the pressure is on to turn land that once produced a portfolio of diverse crops into quinoa monoculture.

In fact, the quinoa trade is yet another troubling example of a damaging north-south exchange, with well-intentioned health and ethics-led consumers here unwittingly driving poverty there. It’s beginning to look like a cautionary tale of how a focus on exporting premium foods can damage the producer country’s food security. Feeding our apparently insatiable 365-day-a-year hunger for this luxury vegetable, Peru has also cornered the world market in asparagus. Result? In the arid Ica region where Peruvian asparagus production is concentrated, this thirsty export vegetable has depleted the water resources [4] on which local people depend. NGOs report that asparagus labourers toil in sub-standard conditions and cannot afford to feed their children while fat cat exporters and foreign supermarkets cream off the profits. That’s the pedigree of all those bunches of pricy spears on supermarket shelves.

Soya, a foodstuff beloved of the vegan lobby as an alternative to dairy products, is another problematic import, one that drives environmental destruction [see footnote]. Embarrassingly, for those who portray it as a progressive alternative to planet-destroying meat, soya production is now one of the two main causes of deforestation in South America, along with cattle ranching, where vast expanses of forest and grassland have been felled to make way for huge plantations.

Three years ago, the pioneering Fife Diet [5], Europe’s biggest local food-eating project, sowed an experimental crop of quinoa. It failed, and the

Quinoa-9487

Quinoa-9487 (Photo credit: graibeard)

experiment has not been repeated. But the attempt at least recognised the need to strengthen our own food security by lessening our reliance on imported foods, and looking first and foremost to what can be grown, or reared, on our doorstep.

In this respect, omnivores have it easy. Britain excels in producing meat and dairy foods for them to enjoy. However, a rummage through the shopping baskets of vegetarians and vegans swiftly clocks up the food miles, a consequence of their higher dependency on products imported from faraway places. From tofu and tamari to carob and chickpeas, the axis of the vegetarian shopping list is heavily skewed to global.

There are promising initiatives: one enterprising Norfolk company [6], for instance, has just started marketing UK-grown fava beans (the sort used to make falafel) as a protein-rich alternative to meat. But in the case of quinoa, there’s a ghastly irony when the Andean peasant’s staple grain becomes too expensive at home because it has acquired hero product status among affluent foreigners preoccupied with personal health, animal welfare and reducing their carbon “foodprint”. Viewed through a lens of food security, our current enthusiasm for quinoa looks increasingly misplaced.

• This footnote was appended on 17 January 2013. To clarify: while soya is found in a variety of health products, the majority of production – 97% according to the UN report of 2006 – is used for animal feed.

 


 

 

Links:
[1] http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/
[2] http://www.alternet.org/authors/joanna-blythman
[3] http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2013/jan/14/quinoa-andes-bolivia-peru-crop
[4] http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2010/sep/15/peru-asparagus-british-wells
[5] http://www.fifediet.co.uk/
[6] http://hodmedods.co.uk/about/our-products/
[7] http://www.alternet.org/tags/quinoa
[8] http://www.alternet.org/tags/bolivia
[9] http://www.alternet.org/tags/peru-0
[10] http://www.alternet.org/%2Bnew_src%2B

 

http://www.alternet.org/print/food/can-healthy-food-eaters-stomach-uncomfortable-truth-about-quinoa

 

Massive uplift observed in Andean Mountains due to enlarging magma chamber


October 14, 2012BOLIVIA – Geophysicists at University of California, San Diego (UCSD) have identified a unique phenomenon in Altiplano-Puna plateau, located in the central Andes near the borders of Bolivia, Chile and Argentina. Magma underneath the Earth’s crust is forcing the ground up in one spot, and at the same time sinking the ground around it. The result is something the researchers have described as the “sombrero uplift,” after the popular Mexican hat. According to their report on the phenomenon, published in the journal Science, the two UC San Diego scientists recorded uplift in the crust that measured about 0.4 inches per year for 20 years across an area 62 miles wide; the surrounding area sunk at a lower rate—about eight-hundredths of an inch. “It’s a subtle motion, pushing up little by little every day, but it’s this persistence that makes this uplift unusual. Most other magmatic systems that we know about show episodes of inflation and deflation,” said Yuri Fialko, a professor of geophysics at UCSD and Planetary Physics at the Scripps Institute of Oceanography. Fialko and co-author Jill Pearse said the phenomenon was the result of a diapir, or a blob of magma, that rises to Earth’s crust like heated wax inside a lava lamp. Using satellite data from European Remote Sensing (ERS) and Envisat missions, the geophysicists were able to study the uplift in great detail. In 2006, the team asked for the satellites to gather more data from their orbits over Altiplano-Puna. “It was really important to have good data from different lines of sight, as this allowed us to estimate contributions from vertical and horizontal motion of Earth’s surface, and place crucial constraints on depth and mechanism of the inflation source,” Fialko said. “Back in 2006, it looked like the satellites stopped acquiring data from the ascending orbits over the area of interest. Fortunately, ESA was very responsive to our requests, and generated an excellent dataset that made our study possible. Satellite data and computer models allowed us to make the important link between what’s observed at the surface and what’s happening with the magma body at depth,” he added. Fialko said the study’s findings could fuel future research around magmatic events, including the formation of large calderas. Although this diapir in the Altiplano-Puna plateau appears unlikely to cause such a phenomenon—the creation of large calderas, “supervolcanoes,” are highly destructive events that spew thousands of cubic kilometers of magma into the atmosphere. An event of this type would dwarf the Icelandic volcano eruption in 2011 that ejected large amounts of ash into the atmosphere and disrupted global air travel, Fialko said. Diapirs have been known to exist before, but this new study is the first to recognize an active diapir currently rising through the crust. Fialko said a less prominent uplift phenomenon is taking place near Socorro, New Mexico. The Altiplano-Puna plateau is a highly active area for magma and is part of a South American volcanic arc that extends along the northwest side of the continent. Experts have described the area as the largest known active magma body in Earth’s continental crust. –Red Orbit
http://theextinctionprotocol.wordpress.com/

 

The Hopi Prophecy Bowl 12-21-12


 

The Vision:

To send a million prayers out for the birthing of the 5th World on December 21, 2012.

The Prayers

The birthing of the 5th World happens December 21, 2012, during the winter solstice! This transition into the 5th World will allow for more spiritual presence to be felt for all humans.

For the last 6 months, people have been putting their prayers for themselves, for their loved ones, for the earth, and for balance, peace, hope, harmony, and a new level of human acceptance, into pinches of tobacco and placing the tobacco into the Hopi Prophecy bowl.

On December 21, 2012, we are taking the bowl full of the peoples’ tobacco prayers to the Condor and Eagle SunDance in Bolivia to usher in the 5th World of Humans in ceremony.

Now we are sending out a call to all people everywhere who would like to add their prayers into the Hopi Prophecy Bowl.

So many of you have this transitional movement into the 5th World in your hearts and in your prayers already, so we ask you to submit those prayers to us. When we get your prayers, we will add tobacco to the bowl to send your prayers to Spirit.

All the tobacco prayers will be burned in ceremony releasing them into the As Above during the beautiful 4-day Condor and Eagle SunDance in Bolivia.

We thank you in advance.

Send in a Prayer

There are three ways you can add a prayer to usher in the 5th World:

Submit a prayer online and pin yourself to the map.

Participate in the collective prayers on December 21st, 2012, and pin yourself to the map so others can see.

Make a prayer into a pinch of tobacco and mail it to this address. (if you use this option, please send your tobacco prayers by Nov 15th so we can take them with us):

ISM
Box 343
Gabriola Island, BC
V0R 1X0

How it Works

Prayers make a difference in the morphogenetic field of humans. They help make change happen for the better.

A million prayers sent out all at one time make a big difference in the morphogenetic field of humans. They create a huge wave of change for the better!

* Click here to submit a prayer.

* Write your prayers on the form. These are whatever prayers you wish to make for yourself, for your loved ones, for the earth, and for balance, peace, hope, harmony, and a new level of human acceptance. Send any prayers for a change for the better as we enter the 5th World!

* Pin yourself to the map so others can see.

When your prayers are received, they will be placed into pinches of tobacco and the tobacco will be put into the Hopi Prophecy bowl to be burned ceremonially and sent to Spirit during the 4-day Condor and Eagle SunDance in Bolivia.

http://www.shamanicmedicine.ca/thevision/

 

Disabled Protesters Vs. Riot Police – Disturbing!


Thanks to Kevin for a great find!  This is more evidence humanity is behaviorally on an unsustainable path and heading toward a reset point, massive awakening or straight off a cliff. Personally I prefer the first two destinations. ~A~}

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These photos are unreal. A protest in Bolivia demanding rights for the disabled turned violent yesterday as hundreds of people in wheelchairs and crutches clashed with riot police.

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A group of disabled people march in a protest demanding state benefits and an end to discrimination as they journey to La Paz, Bolivia, Sunday Feb. 19, 2012. The group began their 560-mile march from Trinidad to La Paz on Nov. 15 to ask for a law that gives the disabled population special recognition and administers a yearly allowance of 3,000 bolivianos, or about 430 U.S. dollars.

(AP / Juan Karita)
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A disabled protester holds a sign reading ‘Evo wants a heliport, I want my rights’ (referring to Bolivian President Evo Morales).

(Getty Images / AIZAR RALDES)
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Physically disabled people are seen upon their arrival to La Paz, February 23, 2012.

(Reuters / DAVID MERCADO)
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Riot police wait for protesters in the center of La Paz, February 23, 2012.

(Reuters / DAVID MERCADO)
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(Reuters / DAVID MERCADO)
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(Reuters / DAVID MERCADO)
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More photo’s here:

http://www.buzzfeed.com/gavon/disabled-protesters-vs-riot-police

Scientists are sounding the alarm: the mysterious cracks appear across the planet


Scientists do not know what to think about: South America is bursting at the seams. In southern Peru, suddenly appeared a huge crack length of 3 km and a width of about 100 meters.

Anomaly occurred in the district Huakullani Chukuito province near the famous Lake Titicaca. A crack has appeared almost immediately: the earth like a burst at the site of a large tension, the far scattered huge chunks of soil.

Interestingly, the crack did not appear in the earthquake. In general, there was no catastrophe, the earth simply gone. The crack occurred on level ground and is not associated with any disasters. Scientists are confused with this fact. Cracks also appear in neighboring Bolivia. And not so long ago, the crack happened in Africa – Ethiopia. Maybe these phenomena is common nature: the continents literally split in front of mankind. (BetaNovosti)

Recommended readings:
Large Crack Opens in the Earth in Southern Peru (SoTT)
Giant crack in Africa formed in just days (NewScientist)
Iceland Lake Disappearing Into New Crack in Earth (National Geographic)
ESA’s Envisat satellite witnesses Earth’s largest crack (ESA News)
Deepest crack on earth found in the Caribbean (CNN)
Trinco Earth Crack: No stepping (LankaPuvath)
A Crack Opens in the Ethiopian Landscape, Preparing the Way for a New Sea (DiscoverMagazine)
Tremors Point to a Stressed-Out Stretch of the San Andrea Fault (Discover Magazine)
Earth crack a mistery (EHExtra)
500 foot crack in the earth appears in Michigan, US (FromTheOld)

http://thewatchers.adorraeli.com/2011/03/07/scientists-are-sounding-the-alarm-the-mysterious-cracks-appear-across-the-planet/