Corexit, Oil Dispersant Used By BP, Is Destroying Gulf Marine Life, Scientists Say


 

 

 04/25/2013

 

 

From TakePart’s David Kirby:

 

Three years ago, when BP’s Deepwater Horizon began leaking some 210 million gallons of Louisiana Crude into the Gulf of Mexico, the U.S. government allowed the company to apply chemical “dispersants” to the blossoming oil slick to prevent toxic gunk from reaching the fragile bays, beaches, and mangroves of the coast, where so much marine life originates. But a number of recent studies show that BP and the feds may have made a huge mistake, for which everything from microscopic organisms to bottlenose dolphins are now paying the highest price.

 

After the spill, BP secured about a third of the world’s supply of dispersants, namely Corexit 9500 and 9527, according to The New York Times. Of the two, 9527 is more toxic. Corexit dispersants emulsify oil into tiny beads, causing them to sink toward the bottom. Wave action and wind turbulence degrade the oil further, and evaporation concentrates the toxins in the oil-Corexit mixture, including dangerous compounds called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), known to cause cancer and developmental disorders.

When BP began spraying the Gulf, critics cried foul. They said Corexit is not only toxic to marine life on its own, but when combined with crude oil, the mixture becomes several times more toxic than oil or dispersant alone.

 

Not surprisingly, BP Chief Executive Bob Dudley defended use of the dispersant. “The toxicity of Corexit is about the same as dish soap, which is effectively what it is and how it works,” he told stockholders. “In hindsight no one believes that that was the wrong thing and it would have been much worse without the use of it. I do not believe anybody—anybody with almost common sense—would say waves of black oil washing into the marshes and beaches would have been a better thing, under any circumstances.”

 

BP says that Corexit is harmless to marine life, while the Environmental Protection Agency has waffled, saying both that “long term effects [of dispersants] on aquatic life are unknown” and that data “do not indicate any significant effects on aquatic life. Moreover, decreased size of the oil droplets is a good indication that, so far, the dispersant is effective.”

 

But many scientists, such as Dr. William Sawyer, a Louisiana toxicologist, argue that Corexit can be deadly to people and sea creatures alike. “Corexit components are also known as deodorized kerosene,” Sawyer said in a written statement for the Gulf Oil Disaster Recovery Group, a legal consortium representing environmental groups and individuals affected by the Deepwater Horizon spill. “With respect to marine toxicity and potential human health risks, studies of kerosene exposures strongly indicate potential health risks to volunteers, workers, sea turtles, dolphins, breathing reptiles and all species which need to surface for air exchanges, as well as birds and all other mammals.” When Corexit mixes with and breaks down crude, it makes the oil far more “bioavailable” to plants and animals, critics allege, because it is more easily absorbed in its emulsified state.

 

Sawyer tested edible fish and shellfish from the Gulf for absorption of petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC), believed to have been facilitated by Corexit. Tissue samples taken prior to the accident had no measurable PHC. But after the oil spill, Sawyer found tissue concentrations up to 10,000 parts per million, or 1 percent of the total. The study, he said, “shows that the absorption [of the oil] was enhanced by the Corexit.”

 

In April 2012, Louisiana State University’s Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences was finding lesions and grotesque deformities in sea life—including millions of shrimp with no eyes and crabs without eyes or claws—possibly linked to oil and dispersants.

 

The shocking story was ignored by major U.S. media, but covered in depth by Al Jazeera. BP said such deformities were “common” in aquatic life in the Gulf and caused by bacteria or parasites. But further studies point back to the spill.

 

A just-released study from the University of South Florida found that underwater plumes of BP oil, dispersed by Corexit, had produced a “massive die-off” of foraminifera, microscopic organisms at the base of the food chain. Other studies show that, as a result of oil and dispersants, plankton have either been killed or have absorbed PAHs before being consumed by other sea creatures.

 

Hydrocarbon-laden, mutated seafood is not the only legacy left behind by Corexit, many scientists, physicians, environmentalists, fishermen, and Gulf Coast residents contend. Earlier this week, TakePart wrote about Steve Kolian, a researcher and founder of the nonprofit group EcoRigs, whose volunteer scientists and divers seek to preserve offshore oil and gas platforms after production stops, for use as artificial reefs and for alternative energy production.

 

EcoRigs divers took water and marine life samples at several locations in the months following the blowout. Now, they and countless other Gulf residents are sick, with symptoms resembling something from a sci-fi horror film, including bleeding from the nose, ears, breasts, and even anus. Others complain of cognitive damage, including what one man calls getting “stuck stupid,” when he temporarily cannot move or speak, but can still hear.

 

“If we are getting sick, then you know the marine life out in the Gulf is too,” Kolian said. The diver and researcher completed an affidavit on human and marine health used in GAP’s report.

 

Kolian’s team has done studies of their own to alarming results. “We recently submitted a paper showing levels of hydrocarbons in seafood were up to 3,000 times higher than safety thresholds for human consumption,” he said. “Concentrations in biota [i.e. all marine life] samples were even greater.”

 

Kolian’s friend and colleague, Scott Porter, described in his affidavit to GAP how Corexit had caused dispersed crude to coat the bottom of the sea in a sickening, deadly film. In July 2011, he and other divers traveled to a part of the Florida Panhandle, known as the Emerald Coast for its pristine seawater, to collect samples for the Surfrider Foundation.

 

“When we went diving, however, the water had a brownish white haze that resembled what we saw in offshore Louisiana at 30 feet below sea level,” Porter’s affidavit stated. “I have never witnessed anything like that since I began diving in the Emerald Coast 20 years ago. We witnessed…a reddish brown substance on the seafloor that resembled tar and spanned a much larger area than is typical of natural runoff.”

 

In areas covered with the substance, “we noticed much less sea life,” Porter continued. “There were hardly any sand dollars or crabs and only some fish, whereas we would normally see an abundance of organisms. It was desolate.”

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/04/25/corexit-bp-oil-dispersant_n_3157080.html?utm_hp_ref=green

Note: BP is a prime example of why the corrupt system of commerce must be eliminated once and for all, psychopath CEO’s are hell bent on destroying the planet over profits.

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Nuked #107 My trip to a Mexican hospital


Published on Apr 20, 2013

Rad Chick Rad Chick

Episode 107 air date April 16th, 2013

After getting nuked on the plane ride to Mexico, I ended up having a major health emergency. Thanks to a cab driver named Julio everything turned out ok. However, the plants there show definite genetic damage and something else that seems to be ongoing…I know from measurements this is less likely to be ongoing Fukushima radiation and more likely to be Corexit rain-out…whatever it is, something is f@cking up the plants big-time. Lots of pics shown.

Mary Osbourne (The Mutation Lady from TMI) makes a special appearance and gives us an on the scene report of the TMI drill.

Music is from Desperado, Once Upon a Time in Mexico: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8xuqmj…

Thank you Chrissy, Amanda, and Alicia… Happy graduation sweetie

 

03-05-13-Corexit & Oil on beach-Ft Walton Beach FL


This lady is doing a lot in her area to expose BP contamination and the poisonous gas expulsion in Ft Walton Fl, if you live in the area it looks like she could use help informing locals about the dangerous Hazmat conditions existing in the environment. Flyer flashmobs would be an excellent way to get the word out!

Published on Mar 5, 2013

Cory Lynn Cory Lynn

There are no words to describe this! Just watch the heartbreaking video of my beautiful white beaches that I was born and raised on being destroyed by corexit & oil.

 

Dead dolphins and shrimp with no eyes found after BP clean-up


 

 

Chemicals used to disperse Gulf of Mexico spill blamed for marine deaths and human illness

Hundreds of beached dolphin carcasses, shrimp with no eyes, contaminated fish, ancient corals caked in oil and some seriously unwell people are among the legacies that scientists are still uncovering in the wake of BP’s Deepwater Horizon spill.

This week it will be three years since the first of 4.9 billion barrels of crude oil gushed into the Gulf of Mexico, in what is now considered the largest marine oil spill in the history of the petroleum industry. As the scale of the ecological disaster unfolds, BP is appearing daily in a New Orleans federal court to battle over the extent of compensation it owes to the region.

Infant dolphins were found dead at six times average rates in January and February of 2013. More than 650 dolphins have been found beached in the oil spill area since the disaster began, which is more than four times the historical average. Sea turtles were also affected, with more than 1,700 found stranded between May 2010 and November 2012 – the last date for which information is available. On average, the number stranded annually in the region is 240.

Contact with oil may also have reduced the number of juvenile bluefin tuna produced in 2010 by 20 per cent, with a potential reduction in future populations of about 4 per cent. Contamination of smaller fish also means that toxic chemicals could make their way up the food chain after scientists found the spill had affected the cellular function of killifish, a common bait fish at the base of the food chain.

Deep sea coral, some of which is thousands of years old, has been found coated in oil after the dispersed droplets settled on the sea’s bottom. A recent laboratory study found that the mixture of oil and dispersant affected the ability of some coral species to build new parts of a reef.

Doug Inkley, a senior scientist for the US National Wildlife Federation and author of a report published this week on wildlife affected by the spill, said: “These ongoing deaths – particularly in an apex predator such as the dolphin – are a strong indication that there is something amiss with the Gulf ecosystem.”

Scientists believe that the 1.8 million gallons of dispersant, sprayed as part of the clean-up, have cemented the disaster’s toxic effect on ocean life and human health. The dispersant, called Corexit, caused what some scientists have described as “a giant black snowstorm” of tiny oil globules, which has been carried around the ocean in plumes and has now settled on the sea floor. A study last November found the dispersant to be 52 times more toxic than the oil itself.

Larry McKinney, director of the Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies, said: “Before we depend on dispersants to get rid of oil and get it out of sight, we need to understand what it can do in the open ocean. We’re told to keep oil off the shore and away from estuaries, but we’ve not dealt with something like this before, that’s in the open ocean and gone from top to bottom, affecting the whole water column.”

Scientists believe the addition of dispersants to the oil made it more easily absorbed through the gills of fish and into the bloodstream. Dr William Sawyer, a toxicologist, has studied concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC) in edible fish and shellfish in the region. Samples before the spill had no measurable PHC in the tissue, whereas fish tested in recent months show tissue concentrations as high as 10,000 parts per million, or 1 per cent of all tissue. He said: “The study shows that the absorption [of the oil] was enhanced by the Corexit.”

BP says the dispersants it used are “government approved and safe when used appropriately”, and that extensive testing has shown seafood in the Gulf states is safe to eat.

Louisiana State University’s Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences has found sea life in the Gulf with lesions and deformities that it believes may be linked to the use of dispersants. These include shrimp with no eyes and crabs with no eyes or without claws. BP claims these abnormalities are “common in marine life”, had been seen in the region before, and are caused by bacterial infections or parasites.

In a blow to the region’s tourism, tar balls continue to wash up along the affected coastline, which now stretches from the beaches of Louisiana to Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. Marco Kaltofen, a chemical engineer at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute, said: “We have a reservoir of petroleum and petroleum-contaminated sediment that lies just offshore of several Gulf beaches. Every time we have a storm, all of a sudden you’re getting these tar balls washing up.”

It is not just wildlife that scientists believe has been affected. Michael Robichaux, a Louisiana doctor, has documented 113 patients who he thinks were made ill by exposure to chemicals associated with the spill. Their most common symptoms include headaches, memory loss, fatigue, irritability, vertigo, nausea, blurred vision and insomnia.

One of Dr Robichaux’s patients, Jorey Danos, 32, is a formerly healthy father of three. Since working for BP on the clean-up, he says he has experienced serious ill health, including severe abdominal and joint pain that has left him walking with a cane. Several doctors, including a neurologist, have put his condition down to the neurological impact of exposure to the chemicals related to the spill.

Mr Danos said: “I worked 21 days in one of the boats skimming the oil and we were sprayed directly with Corexit from above on three occasions. My skin came out with bumps and burning and I started having breathing problems. When a speedboat with BP representatives came by I asked for a respirator but they said no, because it would lead to bad media attention. Now I’m still dealing with it three years later.” BP said all workers were provided with safety training and protective equipment and would have had the opportunity to join a class action settlement.

Geoff Morrell, BP’s head of US communications, said: “No company has done more to respond to an industrial accident than BP has in the US Gulf of Mexico.”

http://www.sott.net/article/260843-Dead-dolphins-and-shrimp-with-no-eyes-found-after-BP-clean-up

 

Three years after BP oil spill, USF research finds massive die-off


Note: This photo is a man with a goggles over his eyes, absolutely sickening…

 

 

BP Oil

© Tampa Bay Times

The oil that spewed into the Gulf of Mexico during the Deepwater Horizon disaster three years ago killed off millions of amoeba-like creatures that form the basis of the gulf’s aquatic food chain, according to scientists at the University of South Florida.

The die-off of tiny foraminifera stretched through the mile-deep DeSoto Canyon and beyond, following the path of an underwater plume of oil that snaked out from the wellhead, said David Hollander, a chemical oceanographer with USF.

“Everywhere the plume went, the die-off went,” Hollander said.

The discovery by USF scientists marks yet another sign that damage from the disaster is still being revealed as its third anniversary looms. Although initially some pundits said the spill wasn’t as bad as everyone feared, further scientific research has found that corals in the gulf died. Anglers hauled in fish with tattered fins and strange lesions. And dolphins continue dying.

The full implications of the die-off are yet to be seen. The foraminifera are consumed by clams and other creatures, who then provide food for the next step in the food chain, including the types of fish found with lesions. Because of the size of the spill, the way it was handled and the lack of baseline science in the gulf, there’s little previous research to predict long-term effects.

The disaster began with a fiery explosion aboard an offshore drilling rig on April 20, 2010. It held the nation spellbound for months as BP struggled to stop the oil, but the spill has largely faded from national headlines. The oil is still there, though.

Weathered particles of oil from Deepwater Horizon are buried in the sediment in the gulf bottom and could be there for as much as a century.

“These are not going away any time soon,” Hollander said.

USF researchers dug up core samples from the gulf bottom in 2010, 2011 and 2012, and they plan to return this year and next to compare what they found. Their examination uncovered the massive die-off, according to researcher Patrick Schwing. They also noted an absence of microscopic worms that are normally seen in those areas. The researchers could not estimate how many square miles the die-off covered.

In the core samples, they could see that most of the grayish sediment on the bottom built up gradually over centuries, said Isabel Romero, a researcher working with Hollander. But on top they found a large, dark clump of sediment from the time of the 2010 disaster. The amount registered as 300 times the normal amount of oil-based particles found on the bottom.

The oil in the sediment samples definitely came from the 2010 disaster, Hollander said. The substance bears the same chemical signature as Deepwater Horizon oil.

Effects on fish

That’s also the chemical signature of the substance that has clogged the livers of red snapper and other fish found with lesions. The fish livers were trying to screen out the impurities but could not cope with the quantities, he said.

“We’re seeing lots of connections with fish diseases,” Hollander said. “We’re seeing compromised immune systems.”

The diseased fish began turning up a few months after BP was able to shut off the flow of oil in July 2010. The discovery of fish with lesions faded out the following year, said Steve Murawski, a USF fisheries biologist who has overseen a project that examined 7,000 fish caught in the gulf.

Scientists are now looking for more subtle effects in red snapper, such as reductions in the number of large fish and a decline in the total population, Murawski said. They are looking for any genetic mutations, too, he said.

“If they get sick, that’s one thing,” Murawski said. “But if it changed their genes so that they’re less resistant to disease or have lower weights, that’s a big deal. That would be a real game-changer if true.”

BP spokesman Craig Savage said, “No company has done more, faster to respond to an industrial accident than BP did in response to the Deepwater Horizon accident in 2010. As a result of our $14 billion cleanup effort, BP-funded early restoration projects as well as natural recovery processes, the gulf is returning to its baseline condition – the condition it would be in if the accident had not occurred.”

But USF oceanographers and biologists are finding lingering effects of Deepwater Horizon. That’s no surprise to the biologists, who recall that eight years passed after the Exxon Valdez oil spill before the herring population crashed from immune system problems.

“I spent a lot of time in the marshes in Louisiana,” Murawski said. “You can still find a lot of oil in there.”

Why soiled sediment?

One intriguing question is why some oil settled into the sediment on the bottom of the gulf a mile deep and stayed there. Hollander says that may be the work of two factors. One is the dispersant called Corexit that BP used to try to spread the oil out so it wouldn’t wash ashore. The other is the Mississippi River.

BP sprayed Corexit directly at the wellhead spewing oil from the bottom of the gulf, even though no one had ever tried spraying it below the water’s surface before. BP also used more of the dispersant than had been used in any previous oil spill, 1.8 million gallons, to try to break up the oil.

Meanwhile, the spill coincided with the typical spring flood of the mighty Mississippi, which sent millions of gallons of freshwater cascading in to push the oil away from the coast.

The Corexit broke the oil droplets down into smaller drops, creating the plume, Hollander said. Then the smaller oil droplets bonded with clay and other materials carried into the gulf by the Mississippi, sinking into the sediment where they killed the foraminifera.

In some areas where the die-off occurred, he said, the tiny creatures came back, but in others the bottom remains bare. Meanwhile, some of the burrowing kind are digging down into the contaminated sediment – and stirring it up all over again.

http://www.sott.net/article/260526-Three-years-after-BP-oil-spill-USF-research-finds-massive-die-off

 

Gulf Authorities “Silenced” on Spike in Baby Dolphin Deaths, Dead Sea Lions “Everywhere” in Los Angeles, Dead Manatees in Florida…


For anyone who hasn’t noticed, the elephant has entered the room. Does this mean we’ve reached a tipping point, is this obvious rash of deaths the beginning of environmental collapse? I don’t have the answer, but it sure looks grim without Divine Intervention factored in at some point in the near future. Even if the masses rose up against the PTW tomorrow, we don’t have the technology to “fix” the environmental damage. All we could possibly do is stop the destruction from the power industry’s and chemtrail distribution and let nature go through her natural cleansing process, catastrophic or not she may have to turn and burn some earth before she’s finished clearing away the toxins, but so be it.

Instead of posting all the articles I included links below for anyone interested in details, the titles alone were enough for me after following stories on Fukushima radiation and the BP Gulf oil “catastrophe” that was followed by dumping millions of gallons of Corexit in the waters – an environmental crime still being carried out over the waters of the Gulf today. The people responsible for this are criminally negligent, psychopaths who deserve nothing less than life in jail for their crimes against every living creature on this planet, they deserve the same mercy given toward victims of their perpetual malfeasance.

Published: March 29th, 2013 at 12:39 pm ET
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Title: Spike in marine mammal strandings documented along La., Miss. coast
Source: WWL
Date: March 20, 2013 at 6:12 PM

Angela Hill, Anchor: […] Now experts say we’re seeing an unusual spike in dead dolphins washing up in both Louisiana and Mississippi. […]

Dr. Moby Solangi, executive director of the Institute for Marine Mammal Studies in Gulfport: Yes, we have seen a spike in dolphin strandings. […]

Maya Rodriguez, Reporter: Since the start of this year strandings have been climbing, with 29 in Louisiana and 23 in Mississippi so far.

Solangi: The unusual part in Mississippi is that 18 of the 23 are baby dolphins. […]

Rodriguez: Answers are tough to come by. Dr. Solangi said because of the ongoing investigation and litigation involving the BP oil spill, they can’t share their findings.

Solangi: We have been advised not to discuss our findings or any results from our necropsies or analysis […]

See also: “Manatees Dying in Droves on Both Coasts of Florida” — Deaths of pelicans, turtles, dolphins also increasing — “Scientists fear this is the beginning of a devastating ecosystem collapse”

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Gulf of Mexico ~ Disappearing sheen, disappearing life


Three years after the BP Macondo well disaster, the Gulf of Mexico is still covered in oil and barely sustaining visible life above or below the surface. Undisclosed white matter is appearing and leakages with other drill sites appears to be problematic. With such a massive dead zone, it makes you wonder how long oil rigs have negligently been spewing toxins and the rig disaster wasn’t part of a long term plan to expand the dead zone to include the entire Gulf of Mexico; all aimed at turning the entire region into a vast wasteland of oil rigs leaking oil, Corexit and other toxic chemicals into the core engine of the oceans converter belt.

To keep the sheen suppressed under surface water, spraying Corexit is still a daily routine on behalf of BP. So, below where it mentions the Macondo well looks good after one week, it took thousands of gallons of Corexit to break up the sheen and sink the toxic goo below the surface.

2013 March 16 Saturday
Gulf of Mexico – Macondo prospect, Taylor Energy, Breton Sound

(Today’s Gulf overflight was made possible by donations from the listeners of the radio station ThePowerHour.com. Thank You Joyce Riley and all of your listeners for putting us back in the air to bring you the facts!)  

We jumped at another day of clear skies and calm seas to make a quick flight to check on some of the fifteen oil pollution sites we documented and reported from last Friday’s flight over the Gulf of Mexico off the coast of Louisiana. We were particularly interested to see the status of the extensive sheen we saw in the Macondo area last Friday. To our surprise, that area looked mostly clear today — clear of surface oil, and void of life. The water was beautifully calm, even 50 miles off the coast. Plenty calm enough to see sharks and fish who do not need to break the surface. And yet we saw no bait balls, no flying fish, no seabirds hunting, no rays, turtles, sharks, dolphins, whales. Nada; nothing alive was seen along our flight route today.

The Taylor Energy site — that chronic oil pollution debacle about 12 nm off the coast of Louisiana that has been spewing oil into the Gulf since Hurricane Ivan hit in 2004 — continues to horrify. We filmed plenty of thick rainbow oil, even some brown weathered crude hanging in a portion of it. The thickest part of the slick has moved a few miles northward from where it typically has been in the past, perhaps due to prevailing strong southerly winds of late. But it’s never difficult for us to find it; we usually can spot it more than ten miles away, even on cloudy days.

In addition to the Taylor site, we reported another of what we have seen and reported before and presume to be a natural seep, this one about 12 nm west-southwest of MC252. We also saw and reported a substantial slick (over a mile long) along Louisiana’s eastern coast, east of Empire, LA at the south end of California Bay.  These comprised our three NRC reports, detailed below in our Flight Log. Here are a few sample photos.  Many more follow, in the galleries below.

SEE PHOTO GALLERY & VIDEOS

http://onwingsofcare.org/index.php/protection-a-preservation/gulf-of-mexico-oil-spill-2010/gulf-2013/372-20130316-disappearing-sheen-disappearing-life.html

 

The Real Consequences of An Ocean Floor Collapse


Nick Doms
Huliq
Tue, 22 Jun 2010
A collapse of the ocean floor in the Gulf of Mexico is in our near future but all depends on how such will occur. Two possible scenarios have been analyzed and described by several oceanographic institutions including the Florida Atlantic University (FAU) known for its in depth maritime expertise.

The two possible scenarios are either a complete collapse of the ocean floor right above the Deepwater Horizon well and surroundings or a partial collapse in the form of a mud slide on one side of the well.

The first scenario is unlikely at this time but remains a possibility given the number of crevices that have been created naturally due to the high pressure inside the well. This pressure is created by the large amount of methane gasses that is building up inside the well.

Should this scenario occur, then the prediction is that a vast amount of oil and methane will be released immediately into the water and towards the surface. The aftermath would be a tidal wave, caused by the fast displacement of a large amount of water that will reach the shores of all the Gulf States.

The immediate danger will be to cope with the height of the wave along the shoreline and not necessarily the mixture of oil and Corexit. Both products will obviously affect the local population in the aftermath of the tidal wave and during clean up.

The second scenario, a partial collapse of one side of the well in the form of a large mud slide, will cause a similar effect but to a far lesser extent given that the collapse will happen in a more or less slow motion fashion where water will replace oil and methane over a brief period of time.

A wave is expected to form off the Gulf Coast but will cause less damage and will be far less destructive.

Nevertheless, the impact on the states of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida will be enormous. The tourism industry represents a combined annual income of 150 billion dollars for Alabama and Florida. This industry has been hit hard and may not be able to recover within the next few years after a collapse.

The fishing and shrimping industry that represents the livelihood of small business owners will be affected for at least 10 years and maybe longer.

The ports of New Orleans, Pascagoula and Mobile are and will be inaccessible until the cleanup has been completed. The three ports rely on European and Asian trade for 50% of their annual revenue.

The environmental impact is hard to measure but one thing is certain; 80% of the world’s dolphin population lives in the affected area of the Gulf of Mexico and the whale population migrates to the region to have their babies there.

The BP solution to place relief wells to pump out the oil and methane gas may seem like a good solution but it also represents serious dangers to the integrity of the well’s surface and may cause further cracks and crevices to open.

For the time being this may be the only solution available and let’s hope that the first scenario never occurs.

 

ET INTERVENTION ~ ALEC NEWALD & DAVID GRIFFIN ~ Project Camelot Interview


Bravo Kerry! This information provides another missing link to the trans-humanism/dark ET/military agenda, Morgellions disease, the motives behind the BP catastrophe, Corexit, the poisoning of our food chain and much more. Kerry had problems with technical interference for the first 5min or so before getting the interview started and they continued throughout the interview, which isn’t surprising considering the highly sensitive content of the material. So be patient and listen closely, there’s key intel here that bears serious consideration ~ especially if you listened to the Nuked Radio episode with Early2it last month who discussed synthetic DNA being introduced into the eco-system through Corexit, secondary life forms that live below Earths surface and BP’s encountering black tar, or abiotic oil in the Gulf.

If you haven’t seen Sophia Smallstorms presentation below, it has key information to better understand what’s presented by Alec and David in this interview. Also, Trance-formation by Max Igan is vital to understanding the transhumanism agenda from the bigger picture perspective, you can find the video here by entering the title in the search box.

Published on Jan 6, 2013

Description of Event:

Alec Newald is the author of “Coevolution”

Excerpt:

“Almost 22 years had past now the dreams have come back and there are lights in the sky. You might say I have been activated. What now?

My name is Alec Newald I have never published or operated a web site containing information about my experiences back in 1989, my long published book Coevolution has really been the only public discloser of those experiences save for one or two radio interviews and the odd article published in Nexus Magazine by the publisher of Coevolution Duncan Roads. I had never intended to run a web site either but something is happening on planet earth at this moment that appears to want to include me. So here we are the both of us the one who thought this was all over and the one that knew it never was.” — Alec Newald

Please watch the following in preparation for this event:

From Chemtrails to Pseudo-Life. The Dark Agenda of Synthetic
Biology (FULL LENGTH VIDEO).wmv
Sofia Smallstorm

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=ZSQ-dp1sV5w

Massive fish kill in Myrtle Beach in South Carolina and Galveston Bay in Texas


Wonder how much BP paid in advertising dollars to keep the media silent and the people brainwashed into forgetting the disaster that hit those shores little more than two years ago.

August 20, 2012

The Watchers Tweet Tweet On August 17, 2012, all along the Myrtle Beach coast, beach-goers were finding mixed species of dead fish floating in the surf or washing up on shore - sting rays, pompanos, whitings, flounders… The fish did not have any obvious signs of trauma. Phil Maier, director of Coastal Reserves and Outreach for DNR office in Charleston, said there were groups of dead fish found between 28th and 68th Avenues North Friday. He said that water conditions are...

On August 17, 2012, all along the Myrtle Beach coast, beach-goers were finding mixed species of dead fish floating in the surf or washing up on shore – sting rays, pompanos, whitings, flounders… The fish did not have any obvious signs of trauma.

Phil Maier, director of Coastal Reserves and Outreach for DNR office in Charleston, said there were groups of dead fish found between 28th and 68th Avenues North Friday. He said that water conditions are right for Friday’s fish kill to be caused by hypoxia, or low dissolved oxygen in the ocean. There have been light southwest winds, warm water and spring tides. Maier said it is very likely it was the dissolved oxygen levels that killed the fish, but DNR, the Department of Health and Environmental Controls and scientist at Coastal Carolina University continue to take samples and investigate the cause. Another possible reason is the red tide.

The occurrence of red tides in some locations appear to be entirely natural (algal blooms are a seasonal occurrence resulting from coastal upwelling, a natural result of the movement of certain ocean currents) while in others they appear to be a result of increased nutrient loading from human activities. Other factors such as iron-rich dust influx from large desert areas such as the Saharan desert are thought to play a major role in causing red tides.

Red tide is also potentially harmful to human health. Humans can become seriously ill from eating oysters and other shellfish contaminated with red tide toxin. Red tide algal bloom can potentially cause eye and respiratory irritation (coughing, sneezing, tearing, and itching) to beachgoers, boaters and coastal residents. People with severe or persistent respiratory conditions (such as chronic lung disease or asthma) may experience stronger adverse reactions.

Red tide killed more than million fish in Galveston Bay, Texas

Wildlife officials estimate more than a million fish have been killed in Southeast Texas by the algae bloom known as red tide. The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department offered the estimate after a flyover on August 16 in the Galveston area.Tens of thousands of dead fish began washing up on beaches last weekend. Water samples collected Monday confirmed the red tide at various sites in Galveston Bay. Parts of Galveston Bay have been closed to shellfish harvesting because of the algae bloom, which can cause respiratory problems.

(Credit: Jennifer Reynolds)

The human health effects associated with eating brevetoxin-tainted shellfish are well documented. However, scientists know little about how other types of environmental exposures to brevetoxin—such as breathing the air near red tides or swimming in red tides—may affect humans.

In large concentrations, the algal bloom becomes visible as a brown or red discoloration floating on the surface waters. No visible blooms have been reported though biologists did observe one area of discolored water in Keller Bay near the Alcoa plant and around Aransas Bay.

Red tides in the Gulf of Mexico are mainly a result of high concentrations of Karenia brevis, a microscopic marine algae that occurs naturally but normally in lower concentrations. In high concentrations, its toxin paralyzes the central nervous system of fish so they cannot breathe. Dense concentrations appear as discolored water, often reddish in color. It is a natural phenomenon, but the exact cause or combination of factors that result in a red tide outbreak are unknown.

Water has Memory, Amazing Scientific Discoveries


Four short, ground breaking video’s that will transform the way you see water, yourself and the vital importance of positive thought, prayer and/or meditation upon our body. A body made mostly of water. In addition, through scientific investigation each video  illustrates the urgent need to protect Earths waters from fracking and other forms of pollution that have created massive dead zones in our oceans, lakes, streams and aquafirs.

Uploaded by on Feb 3, 2011

http://oasishd.ca – Water — just a liquid or much more? Many researchers are convinced that water is capable of “memory” by storing information and retrieving it. The possible applications are innumerable: limitless retention and storage capacity and the key to discovering the origins of life on our planet. Research into water is just beginning.

Join Oasis HD Facebook page for more exclusive videos
http://facebook.com/oasishdchannel

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Uploaded by on Nov 16, 2009

Neptune in Pisces: The Renaissance of the Soul http://is.gd/YvGp60

 

Structured Water – Heal Water and Yourself With Your Thoughts. AMAZING INFO! 8/8

 

 

Massive Fishkill Overnight in the Rio Grande, Near Roswell, NM Aug 1, 2011


Alright, considering the fact there were forest fires upstream depositing ash into the river and from the looks of the “blackened” water I’m more comfortable accepting the official explanation than usual. Lately authorities have come up with some pretty lame excuses for these mass wildlife kills, especially around the Gulf of Mexico where it’s obvious what’s killing marine life.

15 dead sharks wash ashore in Manatee County



Last Updated: Friday, April 22, 2011

http://www.baynews9.com/article/news/2011/april/236721/15-dead-sharks-wash-ashore-in-Manatee-County

If you run into a dead shark on the beach, MOTE asks that you contact them at (941) 388-4441.

MANATEE COUNTY —

A mystery is brewing on Manatee County’s beautiful beaches — researchers are trying to figure out why sharks are washing ashore dead.

Recently more than a dozen dead sharks were found on the north ends of Longboat Key and Anna Maria Island.

“There were no real indicators of what went wrong with them,” Dr. Nick Whitney, Staff Scientist for the Center for Shark Research at MOTE Marine Laboratory said. “There are no obvious signs of damage from fishing or net damage or anything like that.”

The species of sharks found were bonnetheads, blacknose and sharpnose.

Whitney said he’s ruled out the possibility that the sharks died as a result of last year’s oil spill.

“Oil spill is pretty unlikely because these animals tend to be coastal,” said Whitney. “They move up and down coast, but they wouldn’t tend to go off shore and in deep water where oil is.”

For now, Whitney says what happened to these sharks remains a mystery.

Researchers have sent samples from the sharks to a different lab to try and see if red tide killed them.

However, they say this is highly unlikely since they have not detected any red tide in the area.

MOTE researchers say finding a dead shark now and then is not rare, but it is uncommon to find a group of them dead within a few days.

Dead Sea Turtles and Dolphins along with continued Oil Spills, Would you Swim in the Gulf?


Editors note: The following article comes from the RSOE Disaster Information Service, one word is noticeably absent from this story – dispersants. It’s obvious to the average person what’s killing everything in the Gulf, do you think it could be the millions of dollars BP spent bribing or even coercing people to stay quiet that keeps this out of the news?  This entire scam makes my head feel want to explode! Just  can’t believe reality has gone so far off track…Much love, Annette

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Sea turtles continue to wash ashore along the Gulf, forcing the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to scramble and figure out what is causing the spike. Last week, the Natural Resources Defense Council and The Huffington Post were first to publish blogs about the sea turtle deaths in Mississippi. Since then, the national media picked up the story. Last Friday, NMFS released a statement with some details about its investigation:

In the past few weeks, we’ve seen an increase in turtle strandings in the northern Gulf, primarily in Mississippi. The spring time is the typical time when turtle strandings in this region begin to increase, but the sharp increases in recent days are of concern to us….NOAA Fisheries is in contact with the states of MS and LA regarding current trawl and other fishery activity that can result in turtle by catch and mortality. In addition, tests will be done for biotoxins, such as those from harmful algae blooms, which are common in the Gulf. …All causes of death, including petroleum, will be investigated when possible based on decomposition. During a necropsy, the full GI tract is examined for product or evidence of oil ingestion. Additionally, samples are taken for PAH analysis. In addition, all turtles are being carefully examined for signs of external oiling.

Like the dolphin strandings this year, it’s likely that many more turtles have died and will never be found. A recent study of dolphin deaths showed the true number of mortalities is probably 50 times what is recovered. As of Friday, NOAA says recent deaths of sea turtles, all of which are included on the Endangered Species list, include 6 in Alabama, 10 in Louisiana, and 47 in Mississippi. Make that at least 50 confirmed sea turtle deaths in Mississippi. This weekend, Pass Christian resident Shirley Tillman found three more dead turtles. Altogether, she has found nine this year. Over her more than 30 years in the community, she has never seen a dead turtle before. On Saturday, she took another walk on the beach, this time with a PBS television producer. Within an hour they found one turtle badly decomposed and hidden in marsh grass near Waveland. Shirley says she only discovered it because of the smell. On Sunday she went back to check on the turtle, which had been spray-painted orange for pick-up by authorities. That’s when she was told there was yet another dead turtle on the beach nearby.

“It’s crazy that I go out there nearly every day and find them. It makes me mad that NOAA is now trying to blame the shrimp fishermen for killing them in their nets when the shrimp season isn’t even open yet and hardly any boats are out there.” Shrimp fishermen feel the same way. They are required to use turtle excluders, devices that allow turtles to escape drowning in shrimp nets. Every year some turtles are killed by fishing boats inadvertently, but shrimpers say to blame them for the recent jump in turtle deaths is hard to believe. “It’s about as ridiculous as anything else I heard during this whole oil spill,” said Louisiana Shrimp Association President Clint Guidry. “This time of year shrimp fishermen are fixing their boats and getting ready for the main season that begins in May. I guess they’ve run out of excuses after saying everything is being killed by dead zones and algae, so now they need to blame us.” Nearly two weeks ago a new oil spill from a shallow well off the Louisiana coast leaked oil into the water that resulted in a huge slick that stretched for miles and polluted parts of Grand Isle and other nearby marshes. The Coast Guard says it was due to oil leaking from a well being capped by Anglo-Suisse, an oil drilling firm based in Texas. Initially the company said it had leaked only 5 gallons of oil.

But the oil slick was clearly much bigger. According to a Skytruth, an analysis of the slick using satellite imagery shows the well may have gushed as much as 640,000 gallons of Louisiana crude into the sea. It’s not clear what impact this oil spill has had on marine life. In Mississippi, Shirley Tillman believes BP oil has something to do with the dead sea life she constantly encounters by the shore. And she wonders how this may affect vacationers now flocking to the region. “It’s bad enough for turtles and dolphins to be dying, but should people and their children be swimming in this water too?” That is not the kind of message BP or local politicians want to hear. Major PR campaigns are underway to convince people the Gulf is normal and the seafood is safe. That’s the message they want to people to hear. But that message is at odds with the views of Gulf residents like Shirley Tillman. She sees a different reality every day she walks the beach.

http://hisz.rsoe.hu/alertmap/woalert_read.php?edis=BH-20110405-30181-USA

“My BP Claim” – Keeping the Memory Alive


As another environmental catastrophe bears down on the natures “delicate web of life” in Japan, we mustn’t let the memory of what happened one year ago this month fade away. People all along the Gulf Coast are sick and dying from chemical related toxic poisoning, while the doctors carelessly look away and the government washes it’s hands of the whole oily mess. Dolphins wash up dead and even land animals are succumbing to the toxins that have seeped into the environment.

The sinister effects of radiation aren’t so obvious as oil, which makes this disaster all the more insidious. We can still see the oil in the Gulf,  the effects from radiation in lower doses can take years to rear it’s ugly head in the form of cancer and birth defects.  You can smell oil in fish, what about radioactivity?  Without a Geiger counter…just say no to seafood.

We will never forget….

9 dead dolphins found since Saturday in Alabama and Mississippi



March 18 2011

http://www.sott.net/articles/show/226114-9-dead-dolphins-found-since-Saturday-in-Alabama-and-Mississippi

Despite what she called an “unusual mortality event” killing dolphins in the Gulf of Mexico, the top federal scientist investigating the deaths, revealed Wednesday that the government has yet to send any tissue samples for laboratory testing to determine a cause. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Blair Mase blamed the delay on complications related to oil spill litigation.

A letter sent by NOAA to groups authorized to collect tissue samples from dead dolphins described the work as “a criminal investigation,” according to Mase.

Nine more dolphin carcasses were recovered in Alabama and Mississippi between Saturday and Wednesday, bringing the total for the two states to 62 since Jan. 1, according to a list compiled Wednesday by the Institute for Marine Mammal Studies.

That list, which had been maintained online by the institute, has since been removed. The institute had been the only source for the specific locations and dates when dead dolphins were found. Federal officials provide only a state-by-state count.

The federal tally is now 114 dead dolphins found throughout the Gulf states. Fifty of them are listed as neonatal, meaning they were either stillborn or aborted by their mothers.

Federal statistics from 2002 to 2007 suggest about 14 dead dolphins would normally wash ashore between January and March along the entire Gulf Coast, with most of those in March, the beginning of the dolphin calving season.

The dolphins are considered potential evidence in the Natural Resources Damage Assessment, or NRDA, lawsuit federal officials will file against BP PLC, majority owner of the well that spawned the Gulf spill.

“The analytical facilities do not have the samples yet. We haven’t sent them out. Once we identify the proper analytic labs, we’ll send the samples out,” said Mase.

She said that it would be months before any laboratory results would be available, and possibly longer before conclusions could be drawn.

“We have to be very methodical, particularly in regards to what facilities we use, the chain of custody,” Mase said. “So I would say, yes, (the NRDA process) does play a role in this, in the delay.”

No cause ruled out

While popular sentiment along the Gulf Coast leans heavily toward blaming BP’s oil spill for the dolphin deaths, Mase said that NOAA isn’t ruling anything out.

Among the possible causes under consideration:

* dinoflagellate blooms, such as red tide.

* snowmelt flowing into the Gulf from winter storms.

* morbillivirus, a dolphin virus related to measles and canine distemper.

* dietary disruptions tied to the oil spill.

* other spill related effects.

“We’re not any closer, unfortunately, to having a definitive cause. We are still getting dead animals, but there does seem to be a general tapering down,” Mase said. “In all of these years in my job, sometimes you find the cause and that feels really good. But in this particular case, you don’t see that smoking gun.”

Ruth Carmichael, who studies marine mammals at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab, expressed frustration with NOAA and the National Marine Fisheries Service.

“It is surprising that it has been almost a full year since the spill and they still haven’t selected labs for this kind of work,” Carmichael said.

National Health Emergency! Gulf spill sickness wrecking lives


As another energy related crisis unfolds in Japan that threatens the lives and health of millions of people in Japan, North America and beyond, it was nearly a year ago that BP destroyed an ocean, an environment and the lives of people all along the Gulf Coast states. Not only have they destroyed lives, they are murderers. The stories are just now beginning to break about people who swam once in the Gulf f Mexico and they are now dead, or sick and dying. Countless children are experiencing suffering that no child should ever have to endure with illness that are stealing them of their precious childhood. This is a time when they should be out playing with their friends, instead they’re home sick in bed or in and out of the hospitals. Only to be told nothings wrong, or nothing can be done. 

I wonder what the world will look like a year from today and what consequence the from the tremendously irresponsible use of nuclear energy will deliver upon the doorstep of humanity. Of course, unlike the toxins present in oil and Corexit that are making people violently ill today, radiation poisoning “usually” takes years 10-30 for the cancer to manifest.

When will we get smart and demand an end to dirty fuels, especially when there are viable alternatives already in production and on paper that are clean and unlimited. The corruption and greed stop now, it’s already too late for millions of people affected by these disasters. Dahr Jamail writes a eye opening story about what’s happening to the people along the Gulf coast, if you ask me they are literally being murdered and no one is listening to their cries for help. They should not be forgotten with the rise of this new disaster and this all should be a catalyst for massive changes in energy policy toward alternative, renewable forms of energy. They’ve been around for 30 years but ridiculed by greedy, ignorant, self serving people and it’s time for them to shut up. And for people to wake up before it’s too late….

Gulf spill sickness wrecking lives

Nearly a year after the oil disaster began, Gulf Coast residents are sick, and dying from BP’s toxic chemicals.
Dahr Jamail Last Modified: 09 Mar 2011 15:42 GMT
National and State Parks along the Gulf Coast have posted health warnings along the coast [Erika Blumenfeld/AJE]

“I have critically high levels of chemicals in my body,” 33-year-old Steven Aguinaga of Hazlehurst, Mississippi told Al Jazeera. “Yesterday I went to see another doctor to get my blood test results and the nurse said she didn’t know how I even got there.”

Aguinaga and his close friend Merrick Vallian went swimming at Fort Walton Beach, Florida, in July 2010.

“I swam underwater, then found I had orange slick stuff all over me,” Aguinaga said. “At that time I had no knowledge of what dispersants were, but within a few hours, we were drained of energy and not feeling good. I’ve been extremely sick ever since.”

BP’s oil disaster last summer gushed at least 4.9 million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico, causing the largest accidental marine oil spill in history – and the largest environmental disaster in US history. Compounding the problem, BP has admitted to using at least 1.9 million gallons toxic dispersants, including one chemical that has been banned in the UK.

According to chemist Bob Naman, these chemicals create an even more toxic substance when mixed with crude oil. Naman, who works at the Analytical Chemical Testing Lab in Mobile, Alabama, has been carrying out studies to search for the chemical markers of the dispersants BP used to both sink and break up its oil.

Poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from this toxic mix are making people sick, Naman said. PAHs contain compounds that have been identified as carcinogenic, mutagenic, and teratogenic.

“The dispersants are being added to the water and are causing chemical compounds to become water soluble, which is then given off into the air, so it is coming down as rain, in addition to being in the water and beaches of these areas of the Gulf,” Naman told Al Jazeera.

“I’m scared of what I’m finding. These cyclic compounds intermingle with the Corexit [dispersants] and generate other cyclic compounds that aren’t good. Many have double bonds, and many are on the EPA’s danger list. This is an unprecedented environmental catastrophe.”

Click for more coverage of the BP Oil Spill, including the other segments of the 8-part series, Fatal Fallout.

Aguinaga’s health has been in dramatic decline.

“I have terrible chest pain, at times I can’t seem to get enough oxygen, and I’m constantly tired with pains all over my body,” Aguinaga explained, “At times I’m pissing blood, vomiting dark brown stuff, and every pore of my body is dispensing water.”

And Aguinaga’s friend Vallian is now dead.

“After we got back from our vacation in Florida, Merrick went to work for a company contracted by BP to clean up oil in Grand Isle, Louisiana,” Aguinaga said of his 33-year-old physically fit friend.

“Aside from some gloves, BP provided no personal protection for them. He worked for them for two weeks and then died on August 23. He had just got his first paycheck, and it was in his wallet, uncashed, when he died.”

National health crisis

Continued here:

http://english.aljazeera.net/indepth/features/2011/03/201138152955897442.html

“Am I Hallucinating?” Coastal areas of Long Beach, Mississippi


Denise Rednaur documents the devastation left behind from the BP oil disaster and all of the dispersants, oil and oil byproducts that inundated the coastal areas of the Gulf of Mexico. This disaster will go on for generations to come…

Thanks Denise!

100,000’s having symptoms from oil disaster, could be just the tip of the iceberg says doctor


Some of  us saw this coming, now an unprecedented national health disaster is emerging along the Gulf Coast. A wide range of horrible symptoms are emerging in people of all ages, children as young as 2-3 yrs old are suffering, sick and in terrible discomfort, yet doctors can’t diagnose what’s going on. Dr Rodney Soto bravely comes forward to sound the alarm on what appears to be a health emergency in entire populations along the coast. The conventional medical system is offering no help and is clueless in treating chemical poisoning, Dr Soto recommends holistic detox programs and seeking holistic doctors for treatment. Also DO NOT EAT THE SEAFOOD OR SWIM IN THE WATER!

People in the south feel isolated, helpless and hopeless, this obvious terrorist attack on our environment and our people, BP needs to be held accountable.

Excellent interview with professionals on the frontline of this crisis, please pass it on this interview needs to go viral to bring attention to this problem.

Program Six ‘Crossing over the Bridge’ The Gulf of Mexico ‘The Deepwater Horizon Human & Environmental Aftermath – Reaching for Solutions’

Guests: Scientist Dr. Brian O’Leary, Dr. Rodney Soto M.D., Advocate MaryLee Orr & Captain Louie
http://www.davidgibbons.org/id292.html

Fourth baby dolphin found dead on Horn Island


HORN ISLAND — The Institute for Marine Mammal Studies has confirmed that a fourth baby dolphin has washed ashore on Horn Island,

The island, one of the longest in the chain that comprises the Gulf Islands National Seashore Park, is about 12 miles south of Ocean Springs.

Three baby dolphins were pinpointed Monday and a fourth was reported today by National Resource Advisory employees who are working with BP cleanup crews on the island.

d
Researchers with the IMMS are headed to the island now to take tissue samples and possibly remove the bodies back for studies.

These infant dolphins are among the 18 reported since January.

The four are also among the 28 total adult and infant dolphins reported since the beginning of the year. None of the dead adults were pregnant females.

The industry’s leading scientist on marine mammal strandings is concerned about these deaths.

Blair Mase, NOAA’s marine mammal stranding coordinator for the Southeast region, confirmed that the number of baby dolphin deaths is high.

She said the Institute for Marine Mammal Studies reports all its findings to her.

So far this calving season, 18 infant dolphins have either been stillborn or died shortly after birth.

“We’re definitely keeping a close eye on this situation,” Mase said. “We’re comparing this to previous years, trying to find out what’s going on here.”

She said this is the time of the year that she sees death in young dolphins, because it is the beginning of the birthing season. But really, the normal birthing season is a little later in the year, she said.

“We’re trying to determine if we do in fact have still births,” she said. There are more in Mississippi than in Alabama and Louisiana.

“With the oil spill, it is difficult,” she said. “We’re trying to determine what’s causing this. It could be infectious related. Or it could be non-infection.

“We run the gamut of causes,” she said, including human impact, which would include the oil spill; infectious disease and bio-toxins,

IMMS has been conducting necropsies on the baby dolphins and sharing the findings with Mase.

Read more about this story later today at sunherald.com. Reporter Karen Nelson and photo journalist Amanda McCoy are on Horn Island today and will be reporting exclusively on what’s happening on the island.

http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2011/02/21/109128/infant-dolphin-deaths-spiking.html

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