Geoengineering Watch Global Alert News, March 18, 2017 ( Dane Wigington GeoengineeringWatch.org )


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The power structure’s all out assault on countless fronts continues to accelerate. Recent studies state that fully half the adults in America are chronically ill. US invasions of foreign nations continue unabated with troops now being sent into Syria. The US Navy is planning to dump 20,000 tons of heavy metals and explosives into our oceans. The Trump administration is attempting to dismantle any and all forms of environmental protection and monitoring, this is exactly what the geoengineers want. A recent report discloses that the oil industry is benefiting from 5.3 trillion in subsidies annually. The oceans are absorbing so much Co2 that the acidification of the seas is unparalleled over at least the last 300 million years. Massive marine ecosystem collapse is occurring all over the globe. If the oceans die, we die. NBC has just published the following headline, “Climate Engineering: Scary idea should be tried out” (as if the weather warfare assault has not already been going on for over 70 years.  Where is Mr. Trump? He has just made his 9th trip to one of his golf courses since taking office.
Many are beginning to awaken to the peril that is surrounding us from all sides. This being said, the pace of the wake-up must increase if we are to have any chance altering our trajectory before total societal collapse commences. The threats we face are existential, all are needed in the critical effort to sound the alarm. We will sink or swim together.
https://www.facebook.com/dane.wigingt…

Plants talk to each other using an internet of fungus


 

It’s an information superhighway that speeds up interactions between a large, diverse population of individuals. It allows individuals who may be widely separated to communicate and help each other out. But it also allows them to commit new forms of crime.

No, we’re not talking about the internet, we’re talking about fungi. While mushrooms might be the most familiar part of a fungus, most of their bodies are made up of a mass of thin threads, known as a mycelium. We now know that these threads act as a kind of underground internet, linking the roots of different plants. That tree in your garden is probably hooked up to a bush several metres away, thanks to mycelia.

The more we learn about these underground networks, the more our ideas about plants have to change. They aren’t just sitting there quietly growing. By linking to the fungal network they can help out their neighbours by sharing nutrients and information – or sabotage unwelcome plants by spreading toxic chemicals through the network. This “wood wide web”, it turns out, even has its own version of cybercrime.

The mycelium of a fungus spreading through soil (Credit: Nigel Cattlin / Alamy)

The mycelium of a fungus spreading through soil (Credit: Nigel Cattlin / Alamy)

Around 90% of land plants are in mutually-beneficial relationships with fungi. The 19th-century German biologist Albert Bernard Frank coined the word “mycorrhiza” to describe these partnerships, in which the fungus colonises the roots of the plant.

Fungi have been called ‘Earth’s natural internet’

In mycorrhizal associations, plants provide fungi with food in the form of carbohydrates. In exchange, the fungi help the plants suck up water, and provide nutrients like phosphorus and nitrogen, via their mycelia. Since the 1960s, it has been clear that mycorrhizae help individual plants to grow.

Fungal networks also boost their host plants’ immune systems. That’s because, when a fungus colonises the roots of a plant, it triggers the production of defense-related chemicals. These make later immune system responses quicker and more efficient, a phenomenon called “priming”. Simply plugging in to mycelial networks makes plants more resistant to disease.

But that’s not all. We now know that mycorrhizae also connect plants that may be widely separated. Fungus expert Paul Stamets called them “Earth’s natural internet” in a 2008 TED talk. He first had the idea in the 1970s when he was studying fungi using an electron microscope. Stamets noticed similarities between mycelia and ARPANET, the US Department of Defense’s early version of the internet.

Film fans might be reminded of James Cameron’s 2009 blockbuster Avatar. On the forest moon where the movie takes place, all the organisms are connected. They can communicate and collectively manage resources, thanks to “some kind of electrochemical communication between the roots of trees“. Back in the real world, it seems there is some truth to this.

Avatar: surprisingly accurate when it comes to trees (Credit: Photos 12 / Alamy)

Avatar: surprisingly accurate when it comes to trees (Credit: Photos 12 / Alamy)

It has taken decades to piece together what the fungal internet can do. Back in 1997, Suzanne Simard of the University of British Columbia in Vancouver found one of the first pieces of evidence. She showed that Douglas fir and paper birch trees can transfer carbon between them via mycelia. Others have since shown that plants can exchange nitrogen and phosphorus as well, by the same route.

These plants are not really individuals

Simard now believes large trees help out small, younger ones using the fungal internet. Without this help, she thinks many seedlings wouldn’t survive. In the 1997 study, seedlings in the shade – which are likely to be short of food – got more carbon from donor trees.

“These plants are not really individuals in the sense that Darwin thought they were individuals competing for survival of the fittest,” says Simard in the 2011 documentary Do Trees Communicate? “In fact they are interacting with each other, trying to help each other survive.”

However, it is controversial how useful these nutrient transfers really are. “We certainly know it happens, but what is less clear is the extent to which it happens,” says Lynne Boddy of Cardiff University in the UK.

Tomato plants can receive signals from their neighbours (Credit: Tracy Gunn / Alamy)

Tomato plants can receive signals from their neighbours (Credit: Tracy Gunn / Alamy)

While that argument rages on, other researchers have found evidence that plants can go one better, and communicate through the mycelia. In 2010, Ren Sen Zeng of South China Agricultural University in Guangzhou found that when plants are attached by harmful fungi, they release chemical signals into the mycelia that warn their neighbours.

Tomato plants can ‘eavesdrop’ on defense responses

Zeng’s team grew pairs of tomato plants in pots. Some of the plants were allowed to form mycorrhizae.

Once the fungal networks had formed, the leaves of one plant in each pair were sprayed with Alternaria solani, a fungus that causes early blight disease. Air-tight plastic bags were used to prevent any above-ground chemical signalling between the plants.

After 65 hours, Zeng tried to infect the second plant in each pair. He found they were much less likely to get blight, and had significantly lower levels of damage when they did, if they had mycelia.

We suggest that tomato plants can ‘eavesdrop’ on defense responses and increase their disease resistance against potential pathogen,” Zeng and his colleagues wrote. So not only do the mycorrhizae allow plants to share food, they help them defend themselves.

Pea aphids eat broad bean plants (Credit: Bildagentur-online / McPhoto-Weber / Alamy)

Pea aphids eat broad bean plants (Credit: Bildagentur-online / McPhoto-Weber / Alamy)

It’s not just tomatoes that do this. In 2013 David Johnson of the University of Aberdeen and his colleagues showed that broad beans also use fungal networks to pick up on impending threats – in this case, hungry aphids.

Johnson found that broad bean seedlings that were not themselves under attack by aphids, but were connected to those that were via fungal mycelia, activated their anti-aphid chemical defenses. Those without mycelia did not.

“Some form of signalling was going on between these plants about herbivory by aphids, and those signals were being transported through mycorrhizal mycelial networks,” says Johnson.

The internet is also a haven for criminals and pirates (Credit: shotstock / Alamy)

The internet is also a haven for criminals and pirates (Credit: shotstock / Alamy)

But just like the human internet, the fungal internet has a dark side. Our internet undermines privacy and facilitates serious crime – and frequently, allows computer viruses to spread. In the same way, plants’ fungal connections mean they are never truly alone, and that malevolent neighbours can harm them.

For one thing, some plants steal from each other using the internet. There are plants that don’t have chlorophyll, so unlike most plants they cannot produce their own energy through photosynthesis. Some of these plants, such as the phantom orchid, get the carbon they need from nearby trees, via the mycelia of fungi that both are connected to.

Other orchids only steal when it suits them. These “mixotrophs” can carry out photosynthesis, but they also “steal” carbon from other plants using the fungal network that links them.

That might not sound too bad. However, plant cybercrime can be much more sinister than a bit of petty theft.

A phantom orchid (Cephalanthera austiniae) (Credit: Tom Hilton, CC by 2.0)

A phantom orchid (Cephalanthera austiniae) (Credit: Tom Hilton, CC by 2.0)

Plants have to compete with their neighbours for resources like water and light. As part of that battle, some release chemicals that harm their rivals.

This “allelopathy” is quite common in trees, including acacias, sugarberries, American sycamores and several species of Eucalyptus. They release substances that either reduce the chances of other plants becoming established nearby, or reduce the spread of microbes around their roots.

Sceptical scientists doubt that allelopathy helps these unfriendly plants much. Surely, they say, the harmful chemicals would be absorbed by soil, or broken down by microbes, before they could travel far.

But maybe plants can get around this problem, by harnessing underground fungal networks that cover greater distances. In 2011, chemical ecologist Kathryn Morris and her colleagues set out to test this theory.

Marigolds are distinctly unfriendly to their neighbours (Credit: blickwinkel / Alamy)

Marigolds are distinctly unfriendly to their neighbours (Credit: blickwinkel / Alamy)

Morris, formerly Barto, grew golden marigolds in containers with mycorrhizal fungi. The pots contained cylinders surrounded by a mesh, with holes small enough to keep roots out but large enough to let in mycelia. Half of these cylinders were turned regularly to stop fungal networks growing in them.

The team tested the soil in the cylinders for two compounds made by the marigolds, which can slow the growth of other plants and kill nematode worms. In the cylinders where the fungi were allowed to grow, levels of the two compounds were 179% and 278% higher than in cylinders without fungi. That suggests the mycelia really did transport the toxins.

The team then grew lettuce seedlings in the soil from both sets of containers. After 25 days, those grown in the more toxin-rich soil weighed 40% less than those in soil isolated from the mycelia. “These experiments show the fungal networks can transport these chemicals in high enough concentrations to affect plant growth,” says Morris, who is now based at Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio.

In response, some have argued that the chemicals might not work as well outside the lab. So Michaela Achatz of the Berlin Free University in Germany and her colleagues looked for a similar effect in the wild.

A black walnut tree (Juglans nigra) (Credit: foto-zone / Alamy)

A black walnut tree (Juglans nigra) (Credit: foto-zone / Alamy)

One of the best-studied examples of allelopathy is the American black walnut tree. It inhibits the growth of many plants, including staples like potatoes and cucumbers, by releasing a chemical called jugalone from its leaves and roots.

Achatz and her team placed pots around walnut trees, some of which fungal networks could penetrate. Those pots contained almost four times more jugalone than pots that were rotated to keep out fungal connections. The roots of tomato seedlings planted in the jugalone-rich soil weighed on average 36% less.

Some especially crafty plants might even alter the make-up of nearby fungal communities. Studies have shown that spotted knapweed, slender wild oat and soft brome can all change the fungal make-up of soils. According to Morris, this might allow them to better target rival species with toxic chemicals, by favouring the growth of fungi to which they can both connect.

Animals might also exploit the fungal internet. Some plants produce compounds to attract friendly bacteria and fungi to their roots, but these signals can be picked up by insects and worms looking for tasty roots to eat. In 2012, Morris suggested that the movement of these signalling chemicals through fungal mycelia may inadvertently advertise the plants presence to these animals. However, she says this has not been demonstrated in an experiment.

Trees and other plants are linked underground (Credit: All Canada Photos / Alamy)

Trees and other plants are linked underground (Credit: All Canada Photos / Alamy)

As a result of this growing body of evidence, many biologists have started using the term “wood wide web” to describe the communications services that fungi provide to plants and other organisms.

“These fungal networks make communication between plants, including those of different species, faster, and more effective,” says Morris. “We don’t think about it because we can usually only see what is above ground. But most of the plants you can see are connected below ground, not directly through their roots but via their mycelial connections.”

The fungal internet exemplifies one of the great lessons of ecology: seemingly separate organisms are often connected, and may depend on each other. “Ecologists have known for some time that organisms are more interconnected and interdependent,” says Boddy. The wood wide web seems to be a crucial part of how these connections form.

Octopuses are taking over the oceans, and no one knows why


 

A new study published in the journal Current Biology has revealed some startling statistics — a group of researchers from the University of Adelaide have found that since the 1950s, the population of cephalopods (octopus, squid, and cuttlefish) in the world’s oceans has exploded. What makes this truly curious is the fact that climate change, overfishing, and ocean acidification have caused the numbers of many fish and shellfish species to plummet during the same period.

octopus, cephalopod, squid, cuttlefish, marine life, ocean life, cephalopod population, ocean research, biodiversity

Scientists aren’t completely sure what’s causing these tentacled creatures to proliferate so widely, but they have a few theories. One idea is that humans have killed off large numbers of predatory fish that would normally compete with the cephalopods for food. But it’s also possible that these species are simply better equipped to deal with rising ocean temperatures than some other ocean animals.

octopus-01-lead-120x120The lead author of the study, Zoe Doubleday, told Gizmodo that the success of these species can largely be attributed to rapid population turnover rates, saying, “Cephalopods tend to boom and bust—they’re called the weeds of the sea. If environmental conditions are good, they can rapidly exploit those conditions because they grow so fast.”

Unfortunately, this isn’t all good news for the species involved. octopus-01-120x120Researchers warn that if the number of cephalopods rises too high, the animals may be forced to resort to cannibalism due to lack of food. As they take over larger portions of the marine ecosystem, they may also be harvested in greater numbers and become a more important staple in the human diet. Either way, the cephalopod population boom is likely to be a mixed blessing for the species involved.

Via Gizmodo

Images via Wikimedia Commons (1, 2)

 

http://inhabitat.com/octopi-are-taking-over-the-oceans-and-no-one-knows-why/

WAGNER, SOUTH DAKOTA — In a letter sent via overnight courier, Tribal Chair Robert Flying Hawk, Yankton Sioux Tribe, is requesting that President Donald Trump release all correspondence and communication pertaining to the President’s decisions that led him to sign the presidential memoranda relating to the Keystone XL and Dakota Access pipelines.

In the letter, dated January 27, 2017, Flying Hawk cites being dismayed that President Trump signed the executive actions shortly after assuming the presidency.

He writes:

Dear President Trump:

On behalf of the Yankton Sioux Tribe, or Ihanktonwan Nation, I respectfully call upon you to immediately release and make public all correspondence and communications received by your office pertaining to the Memorandum on Construction of the Keystone XL Pipeline and the Memorandum on Construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline issued January 24, 2017.

The Yankton Sioux Tribe, whose treaty and ancestral lands are under threat by these projects, is dismayed by your executive actions taken just four days after you assumed office and seven days after the Army Department’s issuance of a Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement in Connection with the Dakota Access Pipeline.

The memoranda appear to have been drafted not by the U.S. Department of Justice or White House counsel, but by the attorneys for the pipeline companies themselves. In light of your decision not to relinquish your business interests prior to taking the oath of office, our Nation has grave concerns that these memoranda serve to fulfill commitments to your personal business interests rather than adherence to the United States’ long-standing trust responsibility to Indian tribes.

As a matter of transparency, and in fulfillment of your trust responsibility as the President of the United States, our Nation calls upon you to release the afore-mentioned correspondence and communications forthwith and without reservation.

Sincerely, Robert Flying Hawk, Chairman Business and Claims Committee

http://nativenewsonline.net/currents/yankton-sioux-tribe-chairman-asks-president-trump-release-correspondence-relating-decisions-pipelines/

Uranium Mining at Grand Canyon Havasupai Sacred Site & Diné Communities Face Imminent Threat


 

Grand Canyon, AZ — On October 13, 2016, Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ)  issued three controversial air quality permits for uranium mines near the Grand Canyon. The uranium mining will desecrate sacred sites and further contaminate communities that have already been plagued by decades of toxic abandoned uranium mines.

“Mother Earth is very precious, every living thing depends on her,” said Cameron Chapter president Milton Tso, “Uranium belongs to our mother, it belongs to her and that’s where it should stay. You’re going to have a battle, I guarantee that you’re going to have a battle from me and from everybody else if this stuff starts going towards our way.”

“We are very upset that ADEQ approved the air quality permits.” stated Havasupai council member Carletta Tilousi, “Even though we stood firm on protecting the lands and sacred areas, again the state of Arizona won’t protect our Grand Canyon homelands as they went ahead and issued the air quality permits. We are very disappointed with the agency.”

Energy Fuels Resources, Inc. (EFRI) operates three uranium mines with leases from the US Forest Service on public lands near the Grand Canyon. The EZ and Arizona 1 mines are located north of Grand Canyon National Park, while the Canyon mine is located abut 5 miles to the south. Arizona 1 mining operations have ceased though uranium is still being stored onsite and hauled to the company’s processing mill in White Mesa, Utah. Energy Fuel’s EZ and Canyon Mines are currently in process of development.

Uranium ore from Canyon Mine would be hauled in 30-ton capacity trucks up to 25 times per day, 300 miles through Flagstaff, Cameron, Tuba City, Kayenta, and Mexican Water to the company’s White Mesa Mill near Blanding, Utah.

The only protection communities along the haul route would have from radioactive pollution would be tarps covering the toxic ore.

map-canyon-mine-uranium-haul-route-web

Although the Navajo Nation has banned uranium mining and milling since 2005, nothing precludes transportation of this hazardous material through Diné lands. The 2005 ban was prompted by the hundreds of abandoned uranium mines that plague the reservation.

Areas such as the Diné community of Cameron continue to face high rates of cancer and poisoned drinking water due to uranium mines left abandoned from the nuclear industry’s toxic legacy.

According to the EPA, “Approximately 30 percent of the Navajo population does not have access to a public drinking water system and may be using unregulated water sources with uranium contamination.”

Nearly 180 miles of the Canyon Mine haul route is through the Navajo Nation, crossing bridges over the Little Colorado and the San Juan Rivers. In 1987, two separate accidents involving haul trucks spilled uranium ore across highways on the Navajo Nation.

ADEQ was initially prompted to suspend air pollution permits for the three mines due to high levels of radiation detected at one of the companies existing mines. The department recently held a series of public hearings in Northern Arizona regarding the permits.

At the August 30, 2016, hearing in Flagstaff, AZ, Milton Tso stated, “Now we’re talking about one of the most sacred places on earth that you want to mine uranium, the Grand Canyon. It’s not only sacred to us as Native people, but sacred to the whole world. We get millions of people that come just to look at this Canyon. And the water that runs through there is very sacred. There’s no guarantee for safety around uranium, around oil, around anything that’s brought out of our mother. There’s no guarantee that it’s going to be safe and it never is, there’s always going to be a spill, there’s always going to be an accident.” stated Tso.

When issuing the approval for air quality permits for the uranium mines, ADEQ responded to public concerns regarding tarps covering the radioactive ore by making requirements for tarps covering haul trucks more “stringent.” ADEQ stated that, “The tarp will be lapped over the sides of the haul truck bed at least 6 inches, and secured every 4 feet with a tie down rope.”

Red Butte

The Canyon mine where EFRI is currently drilling for uranium is near Red Butte, a mountain held sacred by the Havasupai Nation. Red Butte, including the Canyon Mine location, was determined eligible for the National Register of Historic Places as a Traditional Cultural Property in 2009.

Havasupai council member Tilousi testified at the hearing, “We are the most impacted community in the front lines of this contamination and we were never given the opportunity to provide comment and I think that’s wrong. Our most sacred site, our most special sacred mountain, has been taken away from us and has been completely contaminated. We can no longer go over there and do our ceremonies that we’ve done for many centuries. We can no longer pick the sage and the cedar and burn it.” stated Tilousi.

In response to the desecration of Red Butte ADEQ stated, “State law does not allow the Department to include non-air quality requirements in the processing of these permits; however, EFRI is required to meet any and all other applicable state and federal requirements for protecting these resources and properties.” No laws currently ensure protection for sacred sites on federally held lands.

One comment submitted to ADEQ asked the department to conduct calculations to determine mine related emissions throughout Arizona along haul routes. They responded by stating, “ADEQ cannot look at off-site truck emissions when making a permitting decision.”

Several commenters requested that ADEQ perform an assessment of cumulative effects of radon gas, radiation, and radioactive dust in the Grand Canyon region. The department stated, “State law does not allow the Department to consider results of a study like this in a permitting decision for a specific site.”

“I feel that human lives are more important that profit. Water is more important than profit.” stated Carletta Tilousi at the hearing, “I would like for you to seriously look at what you have before you before you give that approval again to the mining companies.”

The uranium mines threaten to further contaminate the Colorado River which flows through the Grand Canyon. More than 40 million people rely on water from the Colorado. According the US Geological Survey, 15 springs and five wells in Grand Canyon watersheds already have high levels of radioactive pollution due to historical uranium mining in the region.

EFRI states that the “Canyon Mine is the highest-grade uranium mine in the US.”

Canyon mine production rate is 109,500 tons per year of uranium ore. The company is also permitted to stockpile up to 13,100 tons of uranium ore at Canyon Mine. The radioactive storage piles will be watered to control dust “and if this is shown to be insufficient” reduction of the storage pile size may be instituted, construction of wind barriers, or tarps could be placed over the storage piles.

Canyon mine

In October 1984, Energy Fuels Nuclear submitted a proposed Plan of Operations to mine uranium from the Canyon Mine claim on Kaibab National Forest Service lands. The final Environmental Impact Statement was issued in 1986, approving the mine. Though no mining occurred, preparations began immediately following that decision. The Havasupai Nation and others sued but lost the case in 1991. In 1987, a group called Evan Mecham Eco Terrorist International Conspiracy or EMETIC, cut 29 power line poles at the Canyon Mine costing the company $200,000. Due to falling uranium prices, the mine was shuttered until Denison Mines, Canyon Mines’ former owner, informed the Forest Service that they intended to  resume mine development in 2011.

In 2006, the price of uranium began rising and as a direct result, thousands of new claims for uranium mines were filed around the Grand Canyon. In 2009, this threat prompted the US Secretary of the Interior to impose a 2-year moratorium for new mining claims on 1 million acres of federal lands surrounding the Grand Canyon. The moratorium was extended to a 20-year halt on new Grand Canyon uranium claims in 2012. This ban would be made permanent through a legislative proposal to establish the Greater Grand Canyon Heritage National Monument. Though, neither the moratorium or proposed National Monument prevents existing uranium mines, like the Canyon Mine, from operating.

On October 27, 2016, EFRI announced that it has located high-grade copper while drilling the shaft at Canyon Mine. The company is now evaluating whether or not it will recover the copper as a “by-product” of uranium mining. EFRI announced that it’s shares were up nearly 8% on Wall Street after it announced copper was found at the mine.

“We have not been informed or properly consulted with about any additional discovery of ore.” stated Tilousi, “If that is the case we need to be consulted with immediately by the mining company and Kaibab Forest Service.”

The Kaibab National Forest, which approved the mining based on the antiquated 1872 Mining Law, has been involved in litigation regarding Canyon Mine since March 2013. In 2015, the U.S. District Court found in favor of the U.S. Forest Service in a lawsuit filed by Grand Canyon Trust, Center for Biological Diversity, Sierra Club and Havasupai Tribe.

On April 14, 2015, the Havasupai Tribe filed an appeal to the 9th Circuit Court, the Grand Canyon Trust, Center for Biological Diversity and Sierra Club followed suit. Oral argument in appeals regarding the Canyon Mine will be heard at the 9th Circuit Court in San Francisco, CA on Thursday, December 15, 2016 at 9:30 am in Courtroom 4. Appeals regarding the case over the 2012 mineral withdrawal will be heard immediately after.

There are more than 15,000 abandoned uranium mines (AUMs) located throughout the entire US. Clean Up The Mines, which has proposed legislation to address AUM clean up, advocates that clean up of abandoned mines must occur immediately.

“Native American nations of North America are the miners’ canaries for the United States trying to awaken the people of the world to the dangers of radioactive pollution”, said Charmaine White Face who works with South Dakota based organization Defenders of the Black Hills and Clean Up The Mines.

South Dakota has 272 AUMs which are contaminating waterways such as the Cheyenne River and desecrating sacred and ceremonial sites. An estimated 169 AUMs are located within 50 miles of Mt. Rushmore where millions of tourists risk exposure to radioactive pollution each year. Indigenous communities have been disproportionately impacted as approximately 75% of AUMs are located on federal and Tribal lands.

“Colonization isn’t just the theft and assimilation of our lands and people, today we’re fighting against nuclear colonialism which is the theft of our future.” stated Morgan.

At a recent Native American Forum on Nuclear Issues held in Western Shoshone and Southern Paiute lands, Leona Morgan of Diné No Nukes stated, “When the US has over 15,000 abandoned uranium mines, it makes no sense to continue making more radioactive waste when we have no where to put it. Instead of spending billions of dollars on weapons modernization and subsidizing aging nuclear reactors, we need to start using those funds to clean up contaminated areas. It starts by leaving uranium in the ground.”

“Colonization isn’t just the theft and assimilation of our lands and people, today we’re fighting against nuclear colonialism which is the theft of our future.” stated Morgan.

https://intercontinentalcry.org/uranium-mining-grand-canyon/

North Dakota Oil Pipeline Spills An Estimated 176,000 Gallons


About 150 miles from where thousands have protested for months that the Dakota Access pipeline could threaten a Sioux tribe’s water supply, a pipeline in the western part of North Dakota has spilled more than 130,000 gallons of oil into a creek, state officials said. 

In all, the Belle Fourche pipeline lost 4,200 barrels of crude oil, or more than 176,000 gallons, before operators shut it down, according to state Department of Health spokeswoman Jennifer Skjod. Most of the oil flowed into the Ash Coulee Creek near Belfield, Skjod said. 

It’s unclear what caused the break, according to Wendy Owen, a spokeswoman for Wyoming-based True Companies, which owns the pipeline. A landowner discovered the leak Dec. 5. The company uses monitoring technology designed to detect leaks, but it possibly failed because of “the intermittent nature of the flow” of oil through the pipeline, Owen said.

A blizzard last week has impeded efforts to assess the spill’s extent and its impact on the environment. The creek is frozen. Officials are investigating when the pipeline, which typically carried 1,000 barrels of oil per day, started to leak.

“We have no estimate on when or if it will be operational,” Skjod said of the pipleline.

The Associated Press reported the company has declared 36 other spills since 2006, totaling more than 320,000 gallons of petroleum products.

The area is west of where the Standing Rock Sioux and their allies have fought construction on the Dakota Access pipeline, which had been expected to cross under Lake Oahe, a plan that is now on hold. The Sioux have argued that a pipeline rupture could contaminate the water supply and damage sacred lands.

The Barack Obama administration announced last week that it would not grant an easement to developer Energy Transfer Partners to build the final section of the Dakota Access pipeline. The developer has expressed confidence that the project will be completed after President-elect Donald Trump takes office.

 

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/north-dakota-pipeline-spills-estimated-176000-gallons_us_584f2375e4b0e05aded56896

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Hemp Could Replace Petroleum As A Fuel Source


By Doug Fine

It was midday on February 10, 2013, and I was very smoothly cruising south out of Denver, Colorado, in a hemp-powered limo. A sleek cream-colored 1979 Mercedes 300D, in fact, purportedly originally owned by Ferdinand Marcos.

“Plenty of space,” the driver told me as when I asked for the keys to the trunk before the drive. “Imelda’s shoes aren’t in there any more.”

Hemp oil was the fuel, but it’s not the kind of thing that I, the pampered passenger, would notice if I weren’t a cannabis journalist. The vehicle was equipped with a proprietary shock system that results in the sort of sensory experience I normally associate with water beds. The giant back seat (more of a back room) sofa—, indeed, all the seats—, were was covered in sheepskin. There was room enough for me to do my morning yoga back there.

Regardless of the unbelievably comfortable ride’s lineage, Bill Althouse, the chauffeur, was trying to demonstrate something on this enjoyable winter outing to Colorado Springs. What the longtime sustainability consultant and renewable energy engineer was showing is that today, in 2013, a plant cultivated by humans for eight millennia can replace petroleum.

In this same year, 2013 is a year during which, is a year during which [DF1] we same humans will no doubt surpass 2010’s consumption of 37.7 billion barrels of oil—that’s 87 million barrels a day, or a million barrels a second.27

It wasn’t proving my least eventful road trip ever. We noticed before we hit Castle Rock that we’d slightly miscalculated the distance for our planned spine-o’-the-Rockies drive this day. But, with a few roadside top-offs, we pulled it off on fumes thanks to the excellent 22 twenty-two MPG we got on hemp biodiesel running through a big, old engine engineered for dictator spinal comfort, not for efficiency.

We wound up using seven gallons of hemp oil for our ride. The U.S. government says that petro diesel spews 22.38 pounds of CO2 into the atmosphere per gallon. That means, since the statistics folks at the Energy Information Agency also say biodiesel releases 78 percent% less carbon, that in this short road trip we prevented 122 pounds of carbon from, ya know, clouding the future of our species. And we didn’t give a penny to ExxonMobil.

For reasons of scale alone, seed oil might not immediately prove the ideal part of the plant for exploiting hemp’s energy potential, according to Althouse. For one thing which is to say, it’d take an awful lot of hemp acreage to prove cost- competitive at the pump. Sure beats fossil diesel, though, in odor alone. The exhaust smelled organic. Like all vegetable- oil-based fuel, it made one hungry.28 Ran quieter and more efficiently, too, Althouse said.

The fuel itself, I earlier noticed as I watched the 61sixty-one-year-old Althouse pour it in from a heavy plastic container, was the fecund green of a lily pad, and it wasn’t easy to acquire or process. Althouse managed to get his hands on some five- gallon “cubies” of food- grade Canadian hemp oil, which was then processed into biodiesel by a local Colorado outfit called ClearEcos.

Back in Imelda’s limo, Althouse said that he’d like to see cannabis’s fiber harnessed for energy rather than the seed oil we were using. At the very least he’d like to see oil cultivars specially developed for fuel, per Potter of the CIC’s sense that a hemp application only works in the big leagues if the right varieties are utilized.

“This Finola [(cultivar]) we’re driving on produces an ideal Omega ratio,” he said. “It’s food, not fuel.”

Here’s why this matters: ClearEcos’s Kurt Lange said that the very lignan and other nutritive components that make hemp seed oil a genuine superfood make it difficult to process to the viscosity needed for federally- approved biofuel.

“We increased the process time to deal with the additional fatty acid chains,” he said of my limo ride’s tankful of hemp oil. It’s not ready for prime time at the corner gas station, in other words, despite the carbon we kept from emitting on February 10 even with this prototype form of cannabis fuel. It’d probably price out north of $10 dollars a gallon—until American farmers get those two million acres planted.

Lang’s piece of behind-the-curtain processing information explains why at no time does my Vaporware Sensor sound more piercingly than when I venture into the energy sector. Probably because it’s so vital to our Netflix, texting, and Cancun vacations (not to mention our food supply) that we resolve our little fossil/nuclear problem, we subject ourselves to a lot of premature excitement about Next Great Energy Supplies. Most of these, so far, have turned out to, at best, require more time and infrastructural investment than excites our insufficiently climate-concerned representatives.

Not that there’s anything inherently wrong with huge investment in important endeavors. It took a massive investment to create, nearly overnight, a wartime economy that could beat Japan after Pearl Harbor. One day General Motors made cars, the next it made tanks. Indeed I keep waiting for President Obama to keep his campaign promise to put America back to work building a sustainable energy grid infrastructure. Make no mistake: Climate change (the sum off its causes and offshoots) is a Pearl Harbor, minus the instant explosions so useful for mobilizing public opinion.

The really good news is that hemp energy needn’t be hugely expensive. Althouse’s message is that, until we develop the right cultivars and grow them en masse, it might not be hemp at the gas pump we see first (via seed), but hemp at the power plant (via fiber). Which is, from a climate stabilization perspective, actually far more important to our species’ survival. Why? Because 40 percent% of carbon emissions come from power plants, according to Daniel Becker of the Safe Climate Campaign.[CE2] [DF3]

So if not hemp biodiesel (in the short term, at least), how exactly are we to transition from climate-altering petroleum and coal without giving up Netflix and Cancun? To answer that, we’re a-’headin’ to Kentucky.

Source: Alternet

Featured Image

Source: The Earth Child

Eagles Destroy Corporate Drones, Cost Mining Company More Than $100,000


Drones owned by one of the world’s largest gold mining companies are being destroyed by native eagles, costing the company thousands of dollars.

wedgieeagle

Mining is one of the most destructive forces currently on the face of the planet. Mines, since the Industrial Era, have poisoned the environment and its workers alike. Gold mining is particularly destructive as its waste carries mercury and cyanide, which are typically used to extract gold from rock. These potent neurotoxins persist in the environment, poisoning the soil, and contaminate water supplies permanently. Gold mining also releases hundreds of tons of elemental mercury into the air annually. In addition, this type of mining is considered particularly destructive because of its wastefulness – over 20 tons of rock and soil must be “treated” and then dislodged to produce enough gold for a single ring. Recently, in the US, the toxic consequences of gold mining were on full display when the Environmental Protection Agency’s incompetence in cleaning out an abandoned gold mine turned the Animas river orange after heavy metal-laden mining waste drained into the river. Before this tragic accident, the EPA had reported that 40% of Western US watersheds had been permanently contaminated by mining.

camodrone

Now that gold mining is not as common as it once was in the US, many other countries have been exploited by gold mining firms in its absence. One of these countries is Australia. Mining in Australia is a major industry with gold mining in Western Australia alone generating over $10 billion every year. However, some of the gold mines there have been experiencing a costly and unexpected problem as nature has apparently decided to fight back against its incursions. Drones that are used to survey the territory around gold mines are being destroyed by native wedge-tailed eagles. Rick Steven, a mine surveyor in the region, said that he had lost nine of his Trimble UX5 drones to eagles, which he labeled “the natural enemy” of drones. After the attacks began, Steven camouflaged his drones as baby eagles. However, the ruse only worked temporarily as 50 flights later the eagles realized the disguised drones were not what they seemed. Each of these drones costs an impressive $20,000, meaning that gold mining companies are losing money fast thanks to the eagles’ intervention. One of these companies, Gold Fields, has already lost over $100,000.

This isn’t the first case of animals fighting back against the degradation of the environment in recent months. Less than a month ago, a herd of wild buffalo appeared out of nowhere in a seeming show of support to the Native Americans and their allies protesting the Dakota Access pipeline. The buffalo, who are considered sacred by the Sioux tribe, appeared by the thousands in a stampede that interrupted a confrontation between protestors and police. After the event, many speculated that the buffalo had appeared to show their solidarity with the protestors and indicated that nature was fighting back against exploitative corporate practices. Hopefully, these acts of defiance from the natural world will inspire people to follow their lead in taking a stand against the corporations destroying the planet.

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Important Message from Keeper of Sacred White Buffalo Calf Pipe


zanleone-arvol-looking-horse-2I, Chief Arvol Looking Horse, of the Lakota, Dakota, and Nakota Nations, ask you to understand an Indigenous perspective on what has happened in America, what we call “Turtle Island.” My words seek to unite the global community through a message from our sacred ceremonies to unite spiritually, each in our own ways of beliefs in the Creator.

We have been warned from ancient prophecies of these times we live in today, but have also been given a very important message about a solution to turn these terrible times.

To understand the depth of this message you must recognize the importance of Sacred Sites and realize the interconnectedness of what is happening today, in reflection of the continued massacres that are occurring on other lands and our own Americas.

I have been learning about these important issues since the age of 12 when I received the Sacred White Buffalo Calf Pipe Bundle and its teachings. Our people have strived to protect Sacred Sites from the beginning of time. These places have been violated for centuries and have brought us to the predicament that we are in at the global level.

Look around you. Our Mother Earth is very ill from these violations, and we are on the brink of destroying the possibility of a healthy and nurturing survival for generations to come, our children’s children.

Our ancestors have been trying to protect our Sacred Site called the Sacred Black Hills in South Dakota, “Heart of Everything That Is,” from continued violations. Our ancestors never saw a satellite view of this site, but now that those pictures are available, we see that it is in the shape of a heart and, when fast-forwarded, it looks like a heart pumping.

The Diné have been protecting Big Mountain, calling it the liver of the earth, and we are suffering and going to suffer more from the extraction of the coal there and the poisoning processes used in doing so.

The Aborigines have warned of the contaminating effects of global warming on the Coral Reefs, which they see as Mother Earth’s blood purifier.

The indigenous people of the rainforest say that the rainforests are the lungs of the planet and need protection.

The Gwich’in Nation in Alaska has had to face oil drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge coastal plain, also known to the Gwich’in as “Where life begins.”

The coastal plain is the birthplace of many life forms of the animal nations. The death of these animal nations will destroy indigenous nations in this territory.

As these destructive developments continue all over the world, we will witness many more extinct animal, plant, and human nations, because of mankind’s misuse of power and their lack of understanding of the “balance of life.”

The Indigenous people warn that these destructive developments will cause havoc globally. There are many, many more indigenous teachings and knowledge about Mother Earth’s Sacred Sites, her chakras, and connections to our spirit that will surely affect our future generations.

There needs to be a fast move toward other forms of energy that are safe for all nations upon Mother Earth. We need to understand the types of minds that are continuing to destroy the spirit of our whole global community. Unless we do this, the powers of destruction will overwhelm us.

Our Ancestors foretold that water would someday be for sale. Back then this was hard to believe, since the water was so plentiful, so pure, and so full of energy, nutrition and spirit. Today we have to buy pure water, and even then the nutritional minerals have been taken out; it’s just empty liquid. Someday water will be like gold, too expensive to afford.

Not everyone will have the right to drink safe water. We fail to appreciate and honor our Sacred Sites, ripping out the minerals and gifts that lay underneath them as if Mother Earth were simply a resource, instead of the source of life itself.

Attacking nations and using more resources to carry out destruction in the name of peace is not the answer! We need to understand how all these decisions affect the global nation; we will not be immune to its repercussions. Allowing continual contamination of our food and land is affecting the way we think.

A “disease of the mind” has set in world leaders and many members of our global community, with their belief that a solution of retaliation and destruction of peoples will bring peace.

In our prophecies it is told that we are now at the crossroads: Either unite spiritually as a global nation, or be faced with chaos, disasters, diseases, and tears from our relatives’ eyes.

We are the only species that is destroying the source of life, meaning Mother Earth, in the name of power, mineral resources, and ownership of land. Using chemicals and methods of warfare that are doing irreversible damage, as Mother Earth is becoming tired and cannot sustain any more impacts of war.

I ask you to join me on this endeavor. Our vision is for the peoples of all continents, regardless of their beliefs in the Creator, to come together as one at their Sacred Sites to pray and meditate and commune with one another, thus promoting an energy shift to heal our Mother Earth and achieve a universal consciousness toward attaining Peace.

As each day passes, I ask all nations to begin a global effort, and remember to give thanks for the sacred food that has been gifted to us by our Mother Earth, so the nutritional energy of medicine can be guided to heal our minds and spirits.

This new millennium will usher in an age of harmony or it will bring the end of life as we know it. Starvation, war, and toxic waste have been the hallmark of the great myth of progress and development that ruled the last millennium.

To us, as caretakers of the heart of Mother Earth, falls the responsibility of turning back the powers of destruction. You yourself are the one who must decide.

You alone – and only you – can make this crucial choice, to walk in honor or to dishonor your relatives. On your decision depends the fate of the entire World.

Each of us is put here in this time and this place to personally decide the future of humankind.

Did you think the Creator would create unnecessary people in a time of such terrible danger?

Know that you yourself are essential to this world. Understand both the blessing and the burden of that. You yourself are desperately needed to save the soul of this world. Did you think you were put here for something less? In a Sacred Hoop of Life, there is no beginning and no ending.

Chief Arvol Looking Horse is the author of White Buffalo Teachings. A tireless advocate of maintaining traditional spiritual practices, Chief Looking Horse is a member of Big Foot Riders, which memorializes the massacre of Big Foot’s band at Wounded Knee.

https://newsununity.com/2016/11/21/important-message-from-keeper-of-sacred-white-buffalo-calf-pipe/

Standing Rock Police Attack Protesters Again: ‘He Just Smiled and Shot Both My Kneecaps’


This is what the time of the unveiling means.

When this all comes out, actions like these will be grounds for attempted murder. If the weather is cold enough, and it is proven that they are using water instead of other methods in order to produce a long-term difficulty in remaining in place to protect what is theirs to protect in the first place from those who are invading on Earth, it will be seen as an act of war.

Note: They are using water to harm “water protectors”. That is a kind of diabolical twist that mocks the honor and spins the situation into an ironic gamble of intentions and misery.

Humans were first taught how to do that, the one’s who do it are not native.

Get the picture?
Aug Tellez

Courtesy Of Avery White

ICE COLD

The ‘water defenders’ trying to stop an oil pipeline were hit with water cannons that turned to ice in the frigid temperatures as rubber bullets and tear gas flew. It didn’t stop them from coming back though.

Holly Devon

11.21.16 10:38 AM ET

Photos Courtesy of Avery White

CANNONBALL, North Dakota—Though the night would soon be marked by tear gas and water cannons shooting through barbed wire and concrete barriers, at the beginning of the gathering held on Sunday evening under the floodlights of the Dakota Access Pipeline construction site, the air was permeated by the sound of prayer and the unmistakeable scent of the sage smoke billowing above the road.

To the Standing Rock “water defenders,” an unflagging devotion to prayer has been the continuous thread in the tumultuous, months long stand-off between the authorities supporting Energy Transfer Partners, the company in charge of constructing the pipeline, and the Lakota of the Standing Rock Reservation and their allies. While those opposing DAPL are certainly determined to prevent the construction of the pipeline underneath the Missouri River less than a mile from the reservation, throughout the main camp of Oceti Sakowin the signs strictly prohibiting the use of any weapons (or anything which can be perceived as such) demonstrate an equal commitment to nonviolence.

This did little to prevent a rapid escalation on the part of the authorities. Though the spiritual ceremonies continued throughout the night around a small fire lit to warm the natives and their allies as temperatures dropped well below freezing, the sound of screams quickly drowned out the prayers. Although authorities claimed water cannons were only used to put out fires set by protestors, the one small fire on the road was well out of the way of the barricade, and the other, where medics treated the residents of Oceti Sakowin who had no access to hot running water or medical facilities, was separated from the melee by a valley running along the road.

Amid allegations that aggressive protesters were attempting to attack the law enforcement line, hundreds of unarmed people were successively tear-gassed and blasted with high pressure water hoses.

“I was tear gassed over 15 times, which made it hard to breathe and left my face burning for hours. I got hosed down with a water cannon in freezing temperatures leaving me hypothermic, and I was slammed into a barbed wire barricade out of panic caused by the police after a flash grenade was thrown and caught fire to a field,” said Cheyenne, a young native woman from Michigan, whose face was streaked with tear gas, and whose eyes were red and swollen.

Another young native man from the Ojibwe nation, reports being openly targeted by a police officer using “non-lethal” weapons to cause serious harm.

Standing Rock

Courtesy Of Avery White

“He shot me with a rubber bullet right in the belly button, and when I showed him that he had hurt me, he just smiled and shot both my kneecaps,” he said.

As the night wore on, ice from the water canons enveloped the barbed wire and glistened under the floodlights. Helicopters circled ominously overhead, and from the hill which sloped away from the road the red lights of police cars grew increasingly numerous. In spite of the hostility, the water defenders continued to hold their ground, in an attempt to communicate their message to those who opposed them. Smiles For The People, a young woman who was maced  throughout the night, insisted that in spite of her injuries, she wouldn’t give up.

“I’m here to protect the water and make sure that DAPL and the workers all know that without water we can’t live—water is sacred, you can’t drink oil,” she said. “What they’re doing is morally wrong in every respect.”

Standing Rock

Courtesy Of Avery White

Others close to the barricade chanted into loudspeakers, hoping to reach the people on the other side.

“We are protecting you! You are protecting oil and we are protecting you. You will be drinking the same clean water as us when we shut this thing down!”

On Monday, Standing Rock water defenders gathered again on Highway 1806, though some of them are still recovering from the night before. On the other side of the barrier are armed police and tanks, and officers are repeatedly threatening arrest for criminal trespassing, though the road is technically public property. The defenders intend to continue to stand their ground, in spite of the exhaustion and extreme cold.

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2016/11/21/standing-rock-police-attack-protesters-again-he-just-smiled-and-shot-both-my-kneecaps.html

Feds to Auction Off Ohio’s Only National Forest to Fracking


Following its final Environmental Assessment and a “Finding of No Significant Impact,” the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has decided to offer 40,000 acres of Wayne National Forest—Ohio’s only national forest—up for fracking.

Fracking could extend to other areas in Ohio, even a national forest. Wayne National Forest is located in southeast Ohio. ACFAN’s Ohio fracking mapThe BLM is now planning an online auction on Dec. 13 to lease the first 1,600 acres of the forest near Monroe, Noble and Washington counties to oil and gas development. The minimum acceptable bid can be as little as $2 per acre.

Local environmental groups and activists have unsurprisingly spoken out against the unconventional drilling of their state’s sole national forest.



Athens County Fracking Action Network (ACFAN) has criticized the BLM for not considering the full extent of fracking’s negative impacts in its final Environmental Assessment posted earlier this month, including fracking’s threat to drinking water and its harm to public health and the climate.

“[US Forest Service decision maker and regional forester Kathleen Atkinson] clearly has ignored the facts that the Environmental Assessment is woefully inadequate,” Athens County resident and Bern Township Trustee Roxanne Groff told EcoWatch via email. “The Assessment does not cover cumulative effects of fracking in the Wayne. Up-to-date research must be used to address climate issues of fracking on public lands. This has NOT been done for the Wayne National Forest. Research that is 11 years old is the basis for her decision.”

http://www.ecowatch.com/res/community/twitter_embed/?iframe_id=twitter-embed-707370907510173697&created_ts=1457485341.0&screen_name=EcoWatch&text=Rise+of+Fracking+Wastewater+Injections+in+Ohio+Sparks+Fears+of+Earthquakes%2C+Water+Contamination+https%3A%2F%2Ft.co%2FhXGv3uIIRe+%40DontFrackNY+%40ukycc&id=707370907510173697&name=EcoWatch

“To date, over 17,000 comments have been submitted to the BLM addressing concerns with fracking in our only National Forest and yet the sale of 1,600 acres of mineral parcels goes forward,” she continued. “Socio-economic facts are misrepresented, violating the 1994 Executive Order 12898 regarding Environmental Justice. The BLM ignores the minority Native American population in the Marietta Unit and the higher than U.S. average low-income population. This is unacceptable!”

“There has been no adequate [National Environmental Policy Act] evaluation of fracking the Wayne to date,” Heather Cantino, ACFAN steering committee chair, said. “The 2006 Plan, which the BLM and USFS cite as the basis for their recent decision to go ahead with leasing, did not evaluate impacts of fracking.”

“The current BLM EA is a shoddy, inadequate document not even worthy of a high school science report,” Cantino added. “The feds apparently want to give away our forest, climate and communities to the fracking industry and will stop at nothing. NEPA and science don’t seem to be relevant anymore to federal actions. This is a horrifying denial of science, law, and justice.”

ACFAN has been working with the Buckeye Forest Council, Sierra Club and other concerned groups and citizens to stop officials from opening up the Wayne National Forest to fracking since 2011. ACFAN also noted that Wayne National Forest is “already highly fragmented and abused, with extensive logging, inappropriate burning, ATV trails (unlike nearby Indiana’s and West Virginia’s, which prohibit them), and increasingly prevalent invasive plants.”

Meanwhile, energy industry officials have applauded the decision. Shawn Bennett, executive vice president of the Ohio Oil and Gas Association, told The Columbus Dispatch that the proposed leases are “a step in the right direction” and “opens up lands that are required to be leased by several federal statutes.”

“The project does not violate any known federal, state, local or tribal law or requirement imposed for the protection of the environment,” states the final report signed by BLM district manager Dean Gettinger.

As it stands, there are now less than 30-days for opponents to file a formal protest of the proposed lease. Nathan Johnson, an attorney for the Ohio Environmental Council, told the Dispatch that his group will appeal the decision on the grounds that the government has not done enough to consider environmental concerns.

A Change.org petition backed by more than 1,200 signatories has also been launched to protest the leasing.

MONSANTO LOSES GMO PERMIT IN MEXICO – JUDGE SIDES WITH THE BEES


A number of countries around the world have now completely banned GM food and the pesticides that go with them, or have severe restrictions against them.

This comes after the world has experienced a massive resistance against Monsanto and other biotech giants that manufacture GMOs and pesticides.

It’s (the resistance) also a result of numerous studies that have emerged showing the environmental and health dangers that are associated with pesticides, as well as health dangers that could be associated with GMOs.

The latest country to make headlines with regards to banning Monsanto products is Mexico, as a group of beekeepers was successful in stopping Monsanto from the planting of soybeans that are genetically modified to resist their Round-up herbicide.

MONSANTO LOSES MEXICAN PERMIT

Monsanto had received a permit to plant its seeds on over 250,000 hectares of land, which equates to approximately 620,000 acres. That’s a lot of land, and they managed to get the permit despite thousands of citizens, beekeepers, Greenpeace, Mayan farmers, The National Institute of Ecology and other major environmental groups protesting against it.

According to The Guardian:

“A district judge in the state of Yucatán last month overturned a permit issued to Monsanto by Mexico’s agriculture ministry, Sagarpa, and environmental protection agency, Semarnat, in June 2012 that allowed commercial planting of Round-up ready Soybeans. In withdrawing the permit, the judge was convinced by the scientific evidence presented about the threats posed by GM soy crops to honey production in the Yucatán peninsula, which includes Campeche, Quintana Roo and Yucatán states. Co-existence between honey production and GM soybeans is not possible, the judge ruled.” 

Mexico is the fourth largest honey producer and fifth largest honey exporter in the world.

THESE PESTICIDES ARE KILLING BEES AND FARMERS ARE UNABLE TO EXPORT POLLEN FROM GMO CROPS

Be colonies are declining very fast, threatening food security all over the world, and as the guardian reports:

“GM crops could devastate the important European export market for Mexican beekeepers, where the sale of honey containing pollen derived from GM crops has been restricted since a landmark decision in 2001 by the European Court of Justice.”

Here is more on a study that found GM pollen destined for Europe after this ruling, and according to local farmers, threatens the honey industry.

Below is a summary of the problem (apart from massive bee declines):

“David Roubik, senior staff scientist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, and his colleagues developed the ability to identify pollen grains in honey in Panama and in Mexico during the 1980s and 1990s when they studied the effects of the arrival of Africanized bees on native bees. “Nobody else can do this kind of work in the ‘big field’ environment and be confident that what they are seeing are soybean pollen grains,” said Roubik. They found that six honey samples from nine hives in the Campeche region contained soy pollen in addition to pollen from many wild plant species. The pollen came from crops near the bee colonies in several small apiaries. Due to strict European regulations, rural farmers in the Mexican Yucatan face significant price cuts or outright rejection of their honey when their product contains pollen from GMO crops that are not for human consumption. The regional agricultural authorities, furthermore, seemed unaware that bees visited flowering soybeans to collect nectar and pollen” 

THERE ARE MULTIPLE CONCERNS HERE, AND ONE OF THEM HAS TO DO WITH THE CROPS THAT HAVE BEEN GENETICALLY MANIPULATED TO RESIST MONSANTO PESTICIDES. WHY? BECAUSE THESE PESTICIDES ARE VERY HARMFUL TO HUMAN AND ANIMAL HEALTH.

A study is published in the US National Library of Medicine and in the journal Food and Chemical Toxicology shows how several recent studies illustrate glyphosate’s potential to be an endocrine disruptor. Endocrine disruptors are chemicals that can interfere with the hormone system in mammals. These disruptors can cause developmental disorders, birth defects and cancer tumors.

A group of scientists put together a comprehensive review of existing data that shows how European regulators have known that Monsanto’s glyphosate causes a number of birth malformations since at least 2002. Regulators misled the public about glyphosate’s safety, and in Germany the Federal Office for Consumer Protection and Food Safety told the European Commission that there was no evidence to suggest that glyphosate causes birth defects.

A new study out of Germany concludes that Glyphosate residue could reach humans and animals through feed and can be excreted in urine. It outlines how presence of glyphosate in urine and its accumulation in animal tissues is alarming even at low concentrations.

It’s also been linked to Alzheimers, Parkinsons Disease and Autism.

A recent study conducted by researchers from RMIT university, published in the journalEnvironmental Research found that an organic diet for just one week significantly reduced pesticide (commonly used in conventional food production) exposure in adults.

Thirteen participants were randomly selected to consume a diet consisting of at least 80% organic or conventional food for precisely 7 days, afterwards crossing over to the alternative diet from which they started. Urinary levels were used for analysis. The study found that urinary dialkylphosphates (DAPs) measurements were 89% lower when they ate an organic diet for seven days compared to a conventional diet for the same amount of time.

“A lot of these agents were initially developed as nerve gases for chemical warfare, so we do know that they have toxic effects on the nervous system at high doses. Conventional food production commonly uses organophosphate pesticides, which are neurotoxins that act on the nervous system of humans by blocking an important enzyme. Recent studies have raised concerns for health effects of these chemicals even at relatively low levels. This study is an important first step in expanding our understanding about the impact of an organic diet”  Dr. Liza Oates

The list goes on and on, but bottom line is that there is a tremendous amount of evidence, and it’s great to see countries like Mexico take more steps towards a completely GMO/Pesticide free environment.

http://embols.com/2016/09/04/monsanto-loses-gmo-permit-in-mexico-judge-sides-with-the-bees-2/

“A Shameful Moment for This Country”: Report Back on Militarized Police Raid of DAPL Resistance Camp ~ Democracy Now


Image result for standing rock
StoryOctober 28, 2016

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We go to Standing Rock, North Dakota, for an update on how hundreds of police with military equipment raided a resistance camp Thursday that was established by Native American water protectors in the path of the proposed $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline. More than 100 officers in riot gear with automatic rifles lined up across a highway, flanked by multiple MRAPs, an LRAD sound cannon, Humvees driven by National Guardsmen, an armored police truck and a bulldozer. Water protectors say police deployed tear gas, mace, pepper spray and flash-bang grenades and bean bag rounds against the Native Americans and shot rubber bullets at their horses. “We learned a lot about the relationship of North Dakota to Native people,” says Tara Houska, national campaigns director for Honor the Earth. “I was standing next to a group of teenagers that were all maced in the face. … Myself, I actually was almost shot in the face by bean bag round.”

NEXTIndigenous Youth Occupy Hillary Clinton Campaign Headquarters to Demand She Take Stand on #DAPL


TRANSCRIPT
This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

AMY GOODMAN: This is Democracy Now!, democracynow.org, The War and Peace Report. I’m Amy Goodman, with Juan González.

JUAN GONZÁLEZ: We turn now to North Dakota, where on Thursday hundreds of police with military equipment raided a resistance camp established by Native American water protectors in the path of the proposed $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline, which has faced months of resistance from the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and members of hundreds of other tribes from across the Americas. On Thursday afternoon, over a hundred officers in riot gear with automatic rifles lined up across North Dakota’s Highway 1806, flanked by multiple MRAPs—that’s mine-resistant ambush protected military vehicles—sound cannon, Humvees driven by National Guardsmen, an armored police truck and a bulldozer. Water protectors say that police deployed tear gas, mace, pepper spray and flash-bang grenades and bean bag rounds against the Native Americans and shot rubber bullets at their horses. This is a video shot by Unicorn Riot, followed by a Facebook Live video from Sacheen Seitcham of the West Coast Women Warriors Media Cooperative.

SACHEEN SEITCHAM: They’ve been pepper-spraying. They’ve maced. They’ve tasered. They’ve thrown percussion bombs and smoke grenades at us. All for water. Over 300 pigs. We are protecting the water. They’re protecting oil. That’s what’s happening.

AMY GOODMAN: Water protectors set up a blockade of the highway using cars, tires, fire in order to try to protect their camp, parts of which were demolished by police. Four people locked themselves to a truck parked in the middle of the highway in order to stop the police advance. Elders also led prayer ceremonies in front of the police line. Some were arrested in the middle of prayer. In total, more than 100 people were arrested. Ahead of the police raid, the Federal Aviation Administration also issued a temporary no-fly zone for the airspace above the resistance camps for all aircraft except for those used by law enforcement. Police appeared to be evicting the frontline camp in order to clear the way for the Dakota Access pipeline company to continue construction. Company cranes and bulldozers were active Thursday just behind the police line on the site of the sacred burial ground where Dakota Access security guards unleashed dogs on Native Americans on September 3rd. We’re going to turn to Dallas Goldtooth of the Indigenous Environmental Network, this clip from the front line.

DALLAS GOLDTOOTH: This is at the front line of the Dakota Access pipeline fight right here. And we are about one—about two miles from the river to the west here—or east, sorry. And to the west, right over this hill, Dakota Access is doing construction, trying to get to this road right here. So there is a police line on top of the hill here with Dakota Access workers and police protecting the workers.

AMY GOODMAN: That’s Dallas Goldtooth. And before that, you hear the LRAD, the long-range acoustic device.

For more, we’re joined by Tara Houska, national campaigns director for Honor the Earth.

Welcome back to Democracy Now!, Tara. Explain what took place yesterday, I mean, the video and the photos that we have of the military hardware, a raid against the protesters.

TARA HOUSKA: Yesterday we saw that—you know, we saw—we learned a lot about the relationship of people to fossil fuels. We learned a lot about the relationship of North Dakota to Native people. And we learned a lot about America and where we stand.

Yesterday, we saw folks being maced. I was standing right next to a group of teenagers that were all maced in the face, maced right—like all kinds of people. Myself, I actually was almost shot in the face by bean bag round. It ricocheted off a truck right next to my head. These police were actively trying to hurt people, pushing them back to allow construction of the Dakota Access pipeline. They were defending monetary interests as human beings were being physically hurt. You know, I saw—I saw, right in front of me, a group of police officers pull a protester forward and begin beating him over the head with sticks. There’s video of it that you can see. I mean, this was an all-out war that was waged on indigenous protectors that were doing nothing more than peacefully assembling. There was no fires, there was nothing like that, until the police began their violent attack on us.

JUAN GONZÁLEZ: And, Tara, where was this incident in—for instance, in relationship to the September 3rd dog attacks at the tribal burial site?

TARA HOUSKA: When Dakota Access jumped ahead over 20 miles to destroy the site that had just been identified by the tribe the day before as a sacred place, that happened on September 3rd. That’s also the anniversary of the Whitestone Hill massacre. That was the exact place the day that Dakota Access was basically constructing its pipeline, right in the background, as literally hundreds and hundreds of people came to stand and pray and bring all of their energy forward to stop this from happening. And it was right at that site where Native American men, women and children had been attacked by private security, by dogs and mace and all the same things that we saw yesterday—this incredible escalated violence against people that were doing nothing more than trying to stop the destruction of sacred sites right in front of their eyes.

AMY GOODMAN: Tara, you saw rifles aimed directly at people, police aiming those rifles?

TARA HOUSKA: Yes, there were police walking around everywhere with assault rifles. Directly across from us, there was actually a policeman holding his rifle trained on us, directly on us. Bean bag rifle assault—bean bag non-lethal weapons were also aimed at us. Every time we put our hands up, they’d put them down. As soon as our hands came down, they would aim back at us. Police officers were smiling at us as they were doing these things. There were police officers filming this, laughing, as they—as human beings were being attacked, being maced. I mean, it was a nightmarish scene. And it should be a shame to the federal government, it should be a shame to the American people, that this is happening within U.S. borders to indigenous people and to our allies, to all people that are trying to protect water. Yesterday was a really shameful moment for this country and where we stand.

AMY GOODMAN: And the number of people you estimate were arrested, Tara?

TARA HOUSKA: I saw dozens of people being arrested. I mean, they were just pulling people out and arresting them. You know, I saw—I actually had to get pulled back from a group that—I mean, the police were pushing forward and just grabbing people at will. We had a number of lockdowns, like that were right in front of us in this truck in the middle of the road, that was used to attempt to blockade these police from advancing forward. There were five people, actually, that were locked to that. They attempted to construct a tipi in the middle, right behind people that were praying and singing. And they—there were folks that locked down to that tipi, or attempted to. The police ripped that tipi down and ripped those people out. It was—it was a really horrible scene yesterday.

Image result for standing rock

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This is the Man Militarized Police at Standing Rock are Working For


Note: The only thing that impacts the elite is being publicly SHAMED, please feel free to SHAME & SHARE 🙂

pipeline-kw-1
Isaac Davis, Staff Writer
Waking Times

The months long Dakota Access Keystone XL pipleine protest at the Standing Rock Indian Reservation by Native Americans and those sympathetic to protection of our water supply has been met with heavy-handed and brutal clamp down by police and national guard. Militarized goons in battle dress have stormed protector camps with LRAD sonic weapons, attack dogs, tear gas, tazers, and even live ammunition (killing horses), while politicians and mainstream media do their best to ignore this growing atrocity, hoping to wait it out until the protestors give up.

But, as the saying goes, Water Is Life, and the issue of life and death is at the root of this protection movement, therefore, for people concerned with life, giving up on this is simply unthinkable. The root issue justifying state oppression of the protest is capitalism, and the perception that money is more important than life itself. When the police and national guard attack U.S. citizens on private property to protect corporate interests, who are they really working for?

The corporate dream of the Keystone XL pipeline is to create a profit stream for a small number of people at the expense of the natural world and anyone in the way. At the top of this pyramid of profit is Texas billionaire Kelcy Warren, CEO of Energy Transfer Partners, the company responsible for the project.

So who is Kelcy Warren?

A native of East Texas and graduate of the University of Texas at Arlington with a degree in civil engineering, Warren worked in the natural gas industry and became co-chair of Energy Transfer Equity in 2007. With business partner Ray Davis, co-owner of the Texas Rangers baseball team, Warren built Energy Transfer Equity into one of the nation’s largest pipeline companies, which now owns about 71,000 miles of pipelines carrying natural gas, natural gas liquids, refined products and crude oil. The company’s holdings include Sunoco, Southern Union and Regency Energy Partners.

Forbes estimates the 60-year-old Warren’s personal wealth at $4 billion. Bloomberg described him as “among America’s new shale tycoons” — but rather than building a fortune by drilling he “takes the stuff others pull from underground and moves it from one place to another, chilling, boiling, pressurizing, and processing it until it’s worth more than when it burst from the wellhead.” [Source]

Shockingly, in 2015 the governor of Texas, Greg Abbott, appointed Warren to the Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission which is an insult to environmentalists working to protect Big Bend National Park and surrounding sacred tribal lands from another $770 million pipeline project.

“According to the governor’s office, the state parks and wildlife commission “manages and conserves the natural and cultural resources of Texas,” along with ensuring the future of hunting, fishing and outdoor recreation opportunities for Texans.” [Source]

This glaring conflict of interest has inspired Environmental Science major at UTSA and former Texas State Park Ambassador Andrew Lucas to begin a drive to have Warren removed from this environmental post. His petition is described here:

Most people may know Kelcy Warren as the man behind the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline. The Dallas-based billionaire and CEO of Energy Transfer Partners has been making headlines for fast-tracking a 1100 mile crude oil pipeline across the Midwest and under the Missouri River, just north of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. No environmental impact assessment, no respect for cultural sites, and no regard for the local and widespread communities living along the river. A similar story is unfolding out in West Texas, where Warren’s company has split through the pristine Big Bend region with the 200 mile Comanche Trail Pipeline and nearly-complete 143 mile Trans Pecos Pipeline. These Pipelines mark the way for massive natural gas and oil developments in the Trans Pecos region.

With untold damages unfolding for cultural and environmental resources at the hands of Energy Transfer Partners, it would surprise most to know that nearly a year ago, Texas Governor Greg Abbott appointed Kelcy Warren for a 6 year term as 1 of the 10 commissioners who preside over Texas Parks And Wildlife…  Why? Probably the $550,000 in campaign contributions Abbott received from Warren.

Read More…

Footage of militarized police using the Long Range Acoustic Device (LRAD) crowd control weapon against protectors at standing rock on October 27th, 2016:

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FWakingTimes%2Fvideos%2F1192547984158281%2F&show_text=0&width=400

Final Thoughts

Warren is listed as number 150 on Forbes list of wealthiest Americans with an estimated net worth of $4.2 billion in September of 2016. He is the head of the Dakota Access Pipeline snake.

If you are scratching your head wondering why militarized police and private security contractors are beating, gassing and attacking peaceful resistors, including women, children and the elderly, the answer is, they are doing it to protect the interests of Kelcy Warren and others invested in this pipeline project.

Read more articles by Isaac Davis.

http://www.wakingtimes.com/2016/10/28/man-militarized-police-standing-rock-working/?utm_source=Waking+Times+Newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=62c82c27dc-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_term=0_25f1e048c1-62c82c27dc-24909009#Q3Z5h6yzPI24HqzT.01

This Incredible Fabric Generates Electricity From Sunlight And Movement


Researchers developed a textile capable of producing electricity from sunlight and from friction, including the wind.

Credit:

Every day, unique and eco-friendly innovations are unveiled. However, a textile designed by engineers with the Georgia Institute of Technology, Chongqing University, and the Chinese Academy of Sciences is likely one you missed hearing about. The fabric is newsworthy because it is capable of producing electricity from sunlight and fiction – including the wind. It could be a total game-changer, yet no one has really heard about it.

According to MotherBoard, the material is both breathable and robust and allows for enough motion to make it a good candidate for wearable electronics. In fact, an image below demonstrates a few of its uses, including powering wearable electronics and directly charging a cellphone.

Credit: Wang et al

The textile consists of solid photovoltaic elements woven together with copper electrodes. The material acts as triboelectric nanogenerator, meaning it is capable of converting certain frictional forces into electric charge, “a la static electricity.”

Zhong Lin Wang from Georgia Tech explains:

“Here, we present a foldable and sustainable power source by fabricating an all-solid hybrid power textile with economically viable materials and scalable fabrication technologies.  Based on lightweight and low-cost polymer fibres, the reported hybrid power textile introduces a new module fabrication strategy by weaving it in a staggered way on an industrial weaving machine via a shuttle-flying process.”

If a human were to wear a 4 cm by 5 cm section of the material and walk in sunlight, an average output of .5 mW would be generated. Taking into account the friction created by movement (like handshaking), one person could generate up to 2 volts per minute.

Credit: Wang et al

When introducing the invention, Wang and his colleagues wrote:

“It is worth noting that the hybrid power textile is not limited to wearable applications. It can also act as a piece of flag, harvesting energy from sunlight and ambient wind blowing, and the delivered power is also capable of charging personal electronics as well as driving electrochemical reactions for self-powered water splitting. In addition, the hybrid power textile was also demonstrated to generate power from weak sunlight and wind from a moving car in a city location on a cloudy day, which also indicates its decent capability of working even in a harsh environment.”

Reportedly, the textile is ready for integration into industrial textile production. It might be sooner than you think that the material is utilized in clothing or flown on a flagpole.

Read More: http://www.trueactivist.com/this-incredible-fabric-generates-electricity-from-sunlight-and-movement/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TrueActivist+%28True+Activist%29

“The Hidden Life of Trees” Peter Wohlleben | Skavlan


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First Nations across North America sign treaty alliance against the oilsands


The thunderous pounding of Indigenous drums echoed in the air on Thursday as more than 50 Indigenous nations across North America rallied together to sign a historic, pan-continental treaty alliance against oilsands expansion in their traditional territory.

The collaboration, formalized at simultaneous ceremonies in Quebec and B.C., aims to block all proposed pipeline, tanker, and rail projects affecting First Nations land and water, including TransCanada’s Energy East pipeline, Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain expansion, Enbridge’s Line 3 pipeline, and Enbridge Northern Gateway.

At the signing on Musqueam land in Vancouver, the lineup of chiefs waiting to put their names down filled up an entire room. It was a powerful ceremony, and participants clad in the regalia of their nations travelled from across B.C. and northern Washington to be part of the growing movement.

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip of the Union of BC Indian Chiefs, who also signed the document, said Indigenous people will no longer stand for dangerous projects on their territory that advance the threat of climate change.

“In this time of great challenge we know that other First Nations will sign on,” he said, extending the invitation to Indigenous communities far and wide.

“Based on our sovereign, inherent right to self-determination, we have collectively decided that we will pick up our sacred responsibilities to the land, waters, and people. We will come together in unity and solidarity to protect our territory from the predations of big oil interests, industry, and everything that represents.”

It’s a movement that’s already happening, he added, with no better example than in North Dakota, where the Standing Rock Sioux have forced the federal government to pause Dakota Access pipeline construction.

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip, Kinder Morgan, Trans Mountain expansion, Union of BC Indian Chiefs
Grand Chief Stewart Phillip of the Union of BC Indian Chiefs signs the Treaty Alliance Against Tar Sands Expansion in Vancouver, B.C. on Thurs. Sept. 22, 2016. Photo by Elizabeth McSheffrey.

Meeting the call to climate change duty

The document, called the Treaty Alliance Against Tar Sands Expansion, commits its signatories to assist one another when called upon in the battle against oilsands expansion, and to work in partnership to move society towards more sustainable lifestyles. By aligning themselves with other Indigenous nations across Canada and the northern U.S., participants hope to ensure that dangerous projects are not able to “escape” by using alternative routes.

“We have the right and the responsibility to stop these major threats to our lands, our waters and our peoples,” said Kanesatake Grand Chief Serge Simon. “For example, from Quebec, we will work with our First Nation allies in B.C. to make sure that the Kinder Morgan pipeline does not pass, and we know they’ll help us do the same against Energy East.”

It comes not only from a legal and cultural responsibility to protect their land, water, air, and climate from harm, said Grand Chief Derek Nepinak of the Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs, but a desire to safeguard a future for all peoples, Indigenous and non-Indigenous as well.

“We want to work with the Prime Minister and the government to develop a sustainable economy that does not marginalize our people,” he said. “This is a time of great spiritual awakening for our peoples as we reinvigorate our Nations and ensure a better tomorrow for all.”

While First Nations, environmentalists and other key stakeholders across North America argue that pipelines, tankers, and oil by rail increase the risk of catastrophic oil spills, threaten critical marine and terrestrial ecosystems, and put international climate targets out of reach, energy companies argue that they will revitalize struggling Canadian economies by bringing energy to overseas markets.

The energy companies also argue that their proposed projects promote responsible resources development. The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers however, Canada’s largest oil and gas lobby group, said the Treaty Alliance will not change the way its members do business with Indigenous communities.

Chief Terry Teegee, Carrier Sekani Nation, Prince George
Chief Terry Teegee of the Carrier Sekani Tribal Council in Prince George, B.C. calls all First Nations to stand together in the fight against oilsands expansion, Thurs. Sept. 22, 2016 in Vancouver. Photo by Elizabeth McSheffrey.

Oil and gas industry to carry on

“Our member companies work with First Nations and Metis communities all the time, regularly, and have a long history of doing that,” said Brian McGuigan, CAPP’s manager of aboriginal policy. “We’ll continue to work with them. Members work with them everyday and have very positive relationships… It’s not always easy conversations, but they continue the dialogue.”

He would not comment on whether he felt the newly-signed document would hinder CAPP’s goal of getting Canadian oil to tidewater.

The new treaty builds on a series of major First Nations victories against oilsands expansion projects, including a Federal Court of Appeal decision in June that overturned the Harper government’s approval of the Enbridge Northern Gateway project, and rallies across the continent that contributed to U.S. President Barack Obama’s decision to kill the Keystone XL pipeline.

American signatories to the treaty include the Standing Rock Sioux, who are fighting Dakota Access Pipeline, the Lummi Nation in Washington, which is currently fighting the Trans Mountain expansion, and the White Earth Nation in Minnesota, which has launched a legal complaint against the Enbridge Line 3 program. Canadian signatories include B.C.’s Katzie First Nation, Tsleil-Waututh Nation, Carrier Sekani Tribal Council, Wet’suwet’en First Nation, and Heiltsuk First Nation, among others.

pipelines, oilsands, tar sands, Treaty Alliance Against Tar Sands expansion, Union of BC Indian Chiefs

A sample of pipeline projects affecting Indigenous communities across North America. Graphic courtesy of the Treaty Alliance Against Tar Sands Expansion.

Here’s what the treaty says:

“Therefore, our Nations hereby join together under the present treaty to officially prohibit and to agree to collectively challenge and resist the use of our respective territories and coasts in connection with the expansion of the production of the Alberta Tar Sands, including for the transport of such expanded production, whether by pipeline, rail or tanker.

As sovereign Indigenous Nations, we enter this treaty pursuant to our inherent legal authority and responsibility to protect our respective territories from threats to our lands, waters, air and climate, but we do so knowing full well that it is in the best interest of all peoples, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous, to put a stop to the threat of Tar Sands expansion.

We wish to work in collaboration with all peoples and all governments in building a more equitable and sustainable future, one that will produce healthier and more prosperous communities across Turtle Island and beyond, as well as preserve and protect our peoples’ way of life.”

WATCH: The signing ceremony in Vancouver

Indigenous chiefs from across B.C. sign a pan-continental Treaty Alliance Against Tar Sands Expansion in Vancouver on Thurs. Sept. 22, 2016. Video by Elizabeth McSheffrey.

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http://www.nationalobserver.com/2016/09/22/news/first-nations-across-north-america-sign-treaty-alliance-against-oilsands

Black Elk vision of Seventh Generation prophecy is happening at Sacred Stone Camp


The Sacred Stone Camp near Cannonball has been housing demonstrators who oppose the Dakota Access Pipeline since late May.

The tent city has quickly grown with representatives of approximately sixty tribes at the site along with individuals from all over the world.

The size of this gathering has come as a surprise to many, but for some Native Americans, this assembly has been anticipated for Seven Generations.

Dakota Goodhouse is one of those who sees coincidences between the past and present.

He teaches a course on Native American Studies at United Tribes Technical College. He’s very familiar with the Seventh Generation prophecy, attributed to Black Elk and other tribal leaders in the late 1800s.

Black Elk’s dream is that this illusion of many hoops will go away and we’ll all see one hoop again,” said Goodhouse.

Goodhouse says, the vision Black Elk foretold depicted a great coming together of Native Americans.

He says the dream also included a reuniting of all races of people.

The Lakota Holy Man saw races represented by hoops and in Seven Generations he saw all hoops becoming one.

“I have to wonder if we’re living in that time now? I do see a resurgence in language and culture in history; it’s nice to see the illusion of many hoops being broken,” said Goodhouse.

The students in his class believe the Sacred Stone Camp is the fulfillment of the Seventh Generation prophecy.

“I think it’s really awesome to see all our different tribes coming together and putting their difference aside. This time, right here, right now is where we all need to come together,” said Katrina Her Many Horses, of Pine Ridge, S.D.

Melvin Miner of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe agrees.

“I think what’s going on with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and the Dakota Access Pipeline conflict, you could say there has been an awakening and awareness that the prophecy is coming to light,” said Miner.

The belief that the Sacred Stone Camp is part of a 125-year-old prophecy elevates the cause for which the water protectors have come together.
Source

VIDEO

https://player.vimeo.com/video/185115668?title=0&byline=0&portrait=0

Coast Salish artist creates surreal images of greed, pollution and pipelines


At first glance, Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun’s work reflects his Coast Salish and Okanagan heritage. Vibrant colours combine with cultural references in the forms of masks, animals and totems.

But on deeper inspection it tells stories of colonialism, corporate greed and pollution — just to name a few.

“You’re looking at the landscape that is just butchered and destroyed and the shaman is standing there going, ‘I can help you, I can heal your soul. But all the things you’re looking at, I can’t fix that,'” Yuxweluptun said, describing his painting Shaman Comes to Fix. It currently hangs in Ottawa’s National Gallery.

A retrospective of his work, called Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun: Unceded Territories, is currently on display at Vancouver’s Museum of Anthropology. The opening was the biggest in the museum’s history, with over 2,000 people in attendance.

Yuxweluptun has been painting his environmental concerns now for over 40 years, and his work has been compared to that of surrealist Salvador Dali.

Artist Website

He cites clear cutting, climate change and oil pipelines as inspiration for the themes in his work.

“As an artist, our job description is the world,” he said. “And these are things that the world has to [deal] with.”

Lately, Yuxweluptun has been painting what he called “super predators” in paintings like Fish Farmers They Have Sea Lice and Christy Clark and the Kinder Morgan Go-Go Girls.

“And that’s my job… is to talk to the world, to enlighten the world, to entertain the world, to make them happy, to make them sad, to make them think,” he said.

“That’s what I like to do, is to think in existential ways to allow people to say, ‘Yeah, we can change, we can make this a better world.’ And that takes time.”
Source

VIDEO

Robert Redford: I Stand with the Standing Rock Sioux


Written by Robert Redford: Robert Redford is an actor, director and trustee of the Natural Resources Defense Council

Something all too familiar is happening in North Dakota right now: Once again, Native Americans are being asked to accept a raw deal.

The short version is this: a private energy company, Energy Transfer Partners, is building a pipeline that runs from North Dakota to Illinois like a 1,200-mile zipper that cuts across four states. If completed, the Dakota Access Pipeline will carry nearly half a million barrels of oil each day across the watersheds the Standing Rock Sioux tribe use for drinking water. Now, thousands of Native Americans have gathered at one of the most controversial sections of the proposed pipeline’s path and are staging a 24/7 protest. They’ve created a settlement in the middle of their North Dakota home to try to prevent the pipeline from being finished.

The pipeline’s existence and its proposed path are each “legal,” of course. Permits were filed. Proposals were considered. A previous route much closer to Bismarck—a primarily white city—was scrapped amid concerns for its citizens’ health and well-being, and a new “more acceptable” route was carved through the home of the Standing Rock Sioux. In short, it’s the business as usual that helps private corporations get what they want in most of the United States, often at the expense of Native Americans.

But if this is legal, one must seriously question the laws of the land. They are laws that prioritize the profits of energy companies over the rights of people who actually have to live on the land, drink its water and eat its food.

The net result is that yet another Native American tribe is being asked to suffer yet again for the “good” of the rest of the country.

But who is this deal good for? There is one winner (Energy Transfer Partners) and about 7 billion losers (everyone else). Climate change is altering how we think about resource use forever, because bad resource use now affects every single one of us. Once burned, the carbon that the proposed DPAL pipeline carried will continue warming our world for years.

We can’t go back in time. We can’t unburn the carbon we’ve burnt—just as we can’t go back in time and change how we as a nation treated Native Americans. But what we can do is try, with all of our might, to break from our country’s tradition of deception and dishonesty in its treatment of its native people, and our deception and dishonesty about the true costs of fossil fuels. Often times—as is the case with the DAPL pipeline—the two are intertwined.

The time has come to recognize and name the fossil fuel industry for what it is: a clear and present danger to the health, prosperity and national security of all of our nation’s people.

National Security? Yes. A recent article in the New York Times reveals that because of climate change many cities on our Eastern Seaboard—including Norfolk, Virginia, home of Naval Station Norfolk, the world’s largest naval base—are having to cope with regular floods that 100 years ago were unheard of.

The Standing Rock protest is trying to prevent a pipeline from being built in North Dakota. But what we need to ask ourselves sooner rather than later is this: Should new pipelines be built at all? Thousands of people are actually going to North Dakota to support the Sioux. But anyone can help in other ways. You can give money. You can contribute to the Sacred Stone Camp Legal Defense Fund or to the Sacred Stone Camp gofundme account. You can give time by making phone calls. Call North Dakota governor Jack Dalrymple at 701-328-2200 and politely share your opinion, or call the White House at 202-456-1111 and politely tell President Obama to rescind the Army Corps of Engineers’ permit for the Dakota Access Pipeline. Though not all of us are able to go to North Dakota and actually stand with Standing Rock, we can stand united. We can be a sea of people, rising up together to prevent the seas from rising and our history of mistreatment of Native Americas from repeating. The Sioux people of North Dakota aren’t just fighting for their homes and their water. They’re fighting for our homes and water, our families and futures, our children’s chances for a habitable home.
Written by Robert Redford for Time Magazine

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