90,000 gallons of oil spilled in the Gulf of Mexico and no one is talking about it


 

by Danny F. Quest | May 23, 2016

Yet Another Oil Spill Wreaks Havoc On The Gulf Of Mexico And Nearby Coastal Communities

A Shell oil facility has leaked nearly 90,000 gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico, according to federal authorities. The spill has left a two-mile by thirteen-mile sheen in the Gulf, approximately 165 miles southwest of New Orleans. A helicopter first noticed the spill near Shell’s Brutus platform on Thursday morning, according to Shell spokeswoman Kimberly Windon.

“There are no drilling activities at Brutus, and this is not a well control incident,” Windon told the Associated Press. Instead, authorities believe the leak came from a release of oil from subsea infrastructure, from a line connecting four wells. According to the Wall Street Journal, Shell had dispatched boats Friday to begin cleaning up the spill.

“We are working with the United States Coast Guard and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Association to define the best approach to contain and clean up the sheen,” Windon said.

According to the United States Coast Guard, the leak has been secured, and the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement is reporting no injuries from the spill.

Local activists, however, are unconvinced by reports that the spill is over. The spill occurred a little less than 100 miles due south of Lousiana’s Terrebonne Parish, which is home to one of the country’s largest communities of Houma Native Americans, who still depend on subsistence lifestyles. If the spill impacts marine life, or washes ashore, it’s likely that these communities might be some of the first impacted.

“You sit down for dinner and you watch the news and you see another spill with tens of thousands of gallons of oil and reports that no one is hurt or the leak has stopped and you know, just from experience, that that’s probably not true,” Colette Pichon Battle, executive director of the Gulf Coast Center for Law and Policy, told ThinkProgress “Who is really going to be hit? It’s going to be our Native American communities that live on, and depend on, the coast. It’s going to be the poorest people on the coast that depend on the ecosystem to be healthy.”

 

The spill comes just days before Battle and others are set to travel to Washington, D.C. for a rally to stop offshore drilling scheduled for Sunday. Organizers expect the event — which will include a march from the White House to the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool — to draw more than a thousand participants from communities along the Arctic, Atlantic, and Gulf coasts.

Just 4 days ago.

Participants hope that the rally will encourage the Obama administration to reconsider allowing offshore drilling in the Gulf and the Arctic under the administration’s new five-year leasing plan. The plan has taken Atlantic drilling off of the table, largely in response to community opposition, but would still allow oil permits in the Arctic and the Gulf.

Battle noted that the spill occurring just days before the rally simply underscores the dangers that offshore drilling can pose to local communities.

“You see this [spill] happening right now, and then you read the federal government’s five-year plan to do more drilling, more exploration, and lease off more land,” she said. “If you live in south Louisiana, you know that’s going to mean more spills.”

In 2010, a BP oil rig exploded in the Gulf, killing 11 men and releasing some 4.2 million barrels of oil into the water in what would become the largest offshore oil spill in history. BP was eventually ordered to pay a $20.8 billion settlement, along with another $4 billion settlement resulting from a federal criminal probe. Thanks to the U.S. tax code, however, BP can classify up to $15 billion of that as a “business expense,” potentially saving the company as much as $5 billion.

READ MORE: http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2016/05/13/3778155/shell-gulf-spill/

http://wearechange.org/oil-spilled-in-gulf-again/

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Corexit, Oil Dispersant Used By BP, Is Destroying Gulf Marine Life, Scientists Say


 

 

 04/25/2013

 

 

From TakePart’s David Kirby:

 

Three years ago, when BP’s Deepwater Horizon began leaking some 210 million gallons of Louisiana Crude into the Gulf of Mexico, the U.S. government allowed the company to apply chemical “dispersants” to the blossoming oil slick to prevent toxic gunk from reaching the fragile bays, beaches, and mangroves of the coast, where so much marine life originates. But a number of recent studies show that BP and the feds may have made a huge mistake, for which everything from microscopic organisms to bottlenose dolphins are now paying the highest price.

 

After the spill, BP secured about a third of the world’s supply of dispersants, namely Corexit 9500 and 9527, according to The New York Times. Of the two, 9527 is more toxic. Corexit dispersants emulsify oil into tiny beads, causing them to sink toward the bottom. Wave action and wind turbulence degrade the oil further, and evaporation concentrates the toxins in the oil-Corexit mixture, including dangerous compounds called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), known to cause cancer and developmental disorders.

When BP began spraying the Gulf, critics cried foul. They said Corexit is not only toxic to marine life on its own, but when combined with crude oil, the mixture becomes several times more toxic than oil or dispersant alone.

 

Not surprisingly, BP Chief Executive Bob Dudley defended use of the dispersant. “The toxicity of Corexit is about the same as dish soap, which is effectively what it is and how it works,” he told stockholders. “In hindsight no one believes that that was the wrong thing and it would have been much worse without the use of it. I do not believe anybody—anybody with almost common sense—would say waves of black oil washing into the marshes and beaches would have been a better thing, under any circumstances.”

 

BP says that Corexit is harmless to marine life, while the Environmental Protection Agency has waffled, saying both that “long term effects [of dispersants] on aquatic life are unknown” and that data “do not indicate any significant effects on aquatic life. Moreover, decreased size of the oil droplets is a good indication that, so far, the dispersant is effective.”

 

But many scientists, such as Dr. William Sawyer, a Louisiana toxicologist, argue that Corexit can be deadly to people and sea creatures alike. “Corexit components are also known as deodorized kerosene,” Sawyer said in a written statement for the Gulf Oil Disaster Recovery Group, a legal consortium representing environmental groups and individuals affected by the Deepwater Horizon spill. “With respect to marine toxicity and potential human health risks, studies of kerosene exposures strongly indicate potential health risks to volunteers, workers, sea turtles, dolphins, breathing reptiles and all species which need to surface for air exchanges, as well as birds and all other mammals.” When Corexit mixes with and breaks down crude, it makes the oil far more “bioavailable” to plants and animals, critics allege, because it is more easily absorbed in its emulsified state.

 

Sawyer tested edible fish and shellfish from the Gulf for absorption of petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC), believed to have been facilitated by Corexit. Tissue samples taken prior to the accident had no measurable PHC. But after the oil spill, Sawyer found tissue concentrations up to 10,000 parts per million, or 1 percent of the total. The study, he said, “shows that the absorption [of the oil] was enhanced by the Corexit.”

 

In April 2012, Louisiana State University’s Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences was finding lesions and grotesque deformities in sea life—including millions of shrimp with no eyes and crabs without eyes or claws—possibly linked to oil and dispersants.

 

The shocking story was ignored by major U.S. media, but covered in depth by Al Jazeera. BP said such deformities were “common” in aquatic life in the Gulf and caused by bacteria or parasites. But further studies point back to the spill.

 

A just-released study from the University of South Florida found that underwater plumes of BP oil, dispersed by Corexit, had produced a “massive die-off” of foraminifera, microscopic organisms at the base of the food chain. Other studies show that, as a result of oil and dispersants, plankton have either been killed or have absorbed PAHs before being consumed by other sea creatures.

 

Hydrocarbon-laden, mutated seafood is not the only legacy left behind by Corexit, many scientists, physicians, environmentalists, fishermen, and Gulf Coast residents contend. Earlier this week, TakePart wrote about Steve Kolian, a researcher and founder of the nonprofit group EcoRigs, whose volunteer scientists and divers seek to preserve offshore oil and gas platforms after production stops, for use as artificial reefs and for alternative energy production.

 

EcoRigs divers took water and marine life samples at several locations in the months following the blowout. Now, they and countless other Gulf residents are sick, with symptoms resembling something from a sci-fi horror film, including bleeding from the nose, ears, breasts, and even anus. Others complain of cognitive damage, including what one man calls getting “stuck stupid,” when he temporarily cannot move or speak, but can still hear.

 

“If we are getting sick, then you know the marine life out in the Gulf is too,” Kolian said. The diver and researcher completed an affidavit on human and marine health used in GAP’s report.

 

Kolian’s team has done studies of their own to alarming results. “We recently submitted a paper showing levels of hydrocarbons in seafood were up to 3,000 times higher than safety thresholds for human consumption,” he said. “Concentrations in biota [i.e. all marine life] samples were even greater.”

 

Kolian’s friend and colleague, Scott Porter, described in his affidavit to GAP how Corexit had caused dispersed crude to coat the bottom of the sea in a sickening, deadly film. In July 2011, he and other divers traveled to a part of the Florida Panhandle, known as the Emerald Coast for its pristine seawater, to collect samples for the Surfrider Foundation.

 

“When we went diving, however, the water had a brownish white haze that resembled what we saw in offshore Louisiana at 30 feet below sea level,” Porter’s affidavit stated. “I have never witnessed anything like that since I began diving in the Emerald Coast 20 years ago. We witnessed…a reddish brown substance on the seafloor that resembled tar and spanned a much larger area than is typical of natural runoff.”

 

In areas covered with the substance, “we noticed much less sea life,” Porter continued. “There were hardly any sand dollars or crabs and only some fish, whereas we would normally see an abundance of organisms. It was desolate.”

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/04/25/corexit-bp-oil-dispersant_n_3157080.html?utm_hp_ref=green

Note: BP is a prime example of why the corrupt system of commerce must be eliminated once and for all, psychopath CEO’s are hell bent on destroying the planet over profits.

Gulf Stream Shut Down Throwing Northern Hemishpere into Deep Freeze


Interesting short video illustrating the shut down of the Gulf stream caused by the BP oil disaster, video’s show that the warm water is gone from the Atlantic Ocean allowing arctic air to overtake the UK, Europe and N America plunging the Northern hemisphere into freezing temperatures and blizzard like conditions.

This is a very serious situation.

Dr Riki Ott – People in the Gulf are “Dropping Dead” from Chemical Poisoning


Marine Toxicologist Dr Riki Ott delivers a powerful message about the truth behind the cover up with the BP Gulf disaster, she gives voice to the people in the South who are literally dropping dead in some cases from chemical poisoning, she  speaks out against corporate corruption involving the environment and how the people can work together to forge new paths towards alternative energy, leaving behind the fossil fuel industry  that’s killing the citizens.  ~A~}

Riki Ott

The Intel Hub
By Shepard Ambellas

On the sixth month anniversary of the oil disaster in the gulf we are still witnessing a complete media blackout.

The people, particularly in Grand Isle, have been poisoned by tyrants that care more about their pocketbooks than human life or mother earth.

According to Riki Ott, marine toxicologist and Exxon Valdez survivor:

“The people that did evacuate (the gulf) are glad they did”
And for good reason.”

” I am dealing with about 3 -4  autopsies right now… I know of people who’s esophagus’ are de-solving, disintegrating… I know of people with 4.75% of their lung capacity, with enlarged hearts… All of these
people have oil in their bodies.”

The gulf oil spill is admittedly a Dept. of Defense operation as reported on by the Army Times and the Intel Hub.

Multiple C-130′s, military and Coast Guard, along with various types of Evergreen Air aircraft and boats have been used to carry out the spraying operation in and around the region.

Boats equipped to spray have also been spotted and well documented by journalists such as Dahr Jamail. There have been reports of out of state contractors and military conducting spraying operations in
throughout the region.

Reports are circulating of deaths, along with people finding VOC’s and other toxins in their bloodstream. The reports also include dizziness, sore throat and trouble breathing, all symptoms of chemical
exposure.

Unfortunately, the regions economy has been devastated, with the fishing industry being the hardest hit. People have lost their medical insurance and more as they are overwhelmed with financial and toxic
doom.

Groups such as Project Gulf Impact and even some law firms are extending a helping hand to people in need.

One of the most unreported cases of murder, corruption and poisoning is taking place right here on American soil while the sleeping masses escape reality due to corporate media control.

 

 

the people, the environment and peoples livelihoods.

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3