US west coast collapse: A plethora of major quakes and eruptions TBW News 2nd week Jan


http://www.thebigwobble.org
Clips
NASA | Synthesis: NASA Data Visualizations In Ultra-HD https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wQF61…
THAR SHE BLOWS! Watch Indonesia’s Mount http://youtube.com/watch?v=7xxIea4ZN94
Global shake movie http://global.shakemovie.princeton.ed…
RTL RAW- Dozens of beached whales die as hundr http://youtube.com/watch?v=3ONaFJVwbmg

Links
70% of our sea birds and 75% of the worlds fish are now depleted http://www.thebigwobble.org/2016/01/7…
A village in the UK endures 75 days’ rain record http://www.thebigwobble.org/2016/01/a…
Deadly heatwave kills 11 in South Africa http://www.thebigwobble.org/2016/01/d…
After two months rain in two days Sydney braces itself for a 40 C heatwave! http://www.thebigwobble.org/2016/01/a…
Unusual never before seen tiny jellyfish-like creatures spotted in the waters off Queensland http://www.thebigwobble.org/2016/01/u…
Soputan Volcano Sulawesi Indonesia spews a violent lava eruption http://www.thebigwobble.org/2016/01/s…

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Monsanto Put on Trial for Crimes against Humanity in The Hague


Note: The global walls are closing in on Monsanto, as the collective wakes-up to “TRUTH” about the matrix and it’s mechanisms of domination and control, the day of reckoning approaches…

 

Posted on Dec 3 2015 – 6:25pm by Sustainable Pulse

The Organic Consumers Association (OCA), IFOAM International Organics, Navdanya, Regeneration International (RI), and Millions Against Monsanto, joined by dozens of global food, farming and environmental justice groups announced today that they will put Monsanto MON (NYSE), a US-based transnational corporation, on trial for crimes against nature and humanity, and ecocide, in The Hague, Netherlands, next year on World Food Day, October 16, 2016.

Monsanto

Since the beginning of the twentieth century according to the groups, Monsanto has developed a steady stream of highly toxic products which have permanently damaged the environment and caused illness or death for thousands of people. These products include:

• PCBs (polychlorinated biphenyl), one of the 12 Persistent Organic Pollutants (POP) that affect human and animal fertility;

• 2,4,5 T (2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid), a dioxin-containing component of the defoliant, Agent Orange, which was used by the US Army during the Vietnam War and continues to cause birth defects and cancer;

• Lasso, an herbicide that is now banned in Europe;

• and RoundUp, the most widely used herbicide in the world, and the source of the greatest health and environmental scandal in modern history. This toxic herbicide, designated a probable human carcinogen by the World Health Organization, is used in combination with genetically modified (GM) RoundUp Ready seeds in large-scale monocultures, primarily to produce soybeans, maize and rapeseed for animal feed and biofuels.

Relying on the “Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights” adopted by the UN in 2011, an international court of lawyers and judges will assess the potential criminal liability of Monsanto for damages inflicted on human health and the environment. The court will also rely on the Rome Statute that created the International Criminal Court in The Hague in 2002, and it will consider whether to reform international criminal law to include crimes against the environment, or ecocide, as a prosecutable criminal offense. The International Criminal Court, established in 2002 in The Hague, has determined that prosecuting ecocide as a criminal offense is the only way to guarantee the rights of humans to a healthy environment and the right of nature to be protected.

The announcement was made at a press conference held in conjunction with the COP21 United Nations Conference on Climate Change, November 30 – December 11, in Paris.

Speaking at the press conference, Ronnie Cummins, international director of the OCA (US) and Via Organica (Mexico), and member of the RI Steering Committee, said: “The time is long overdue for a global citizens’ tribunal to put Monsanto on trial for crimes against humanity and the environment. We are in Paris this month to address the most serious threat that humans have ever faced in our 100-200,000 year evolution—global warming and climate disruption. Why is there so much carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide in the atmosphere and not enough carbon organic matter in the soil? Corporate agribusiness, industrial forestry, the garbage and sewage industry and agricultural biotechnology have literally killed the climate-stabilizing, carbon-sink capacity of the Earth’s living soil.”

Andre Leu, president of IFOAM and a member of the RI Steering Committee, said: “Monsanto is able to ignore the human and environmental damage caused by its products, and maintain its devastating activities through a strategy of systemic concealment: by lobbying regulatory agencies and governments, by resorting to lying and corruption, by financing fraudulent scientific studies, by pressuring independent scientists, and by manipulating the press and media. Monsanto’s history reads like a text-book case of impunity, benefiting transnational corporations and their executives, whose activities contribute to climate and biosphere crises and threaten the safety of the planet.”

Marie-Monique Robin, journalist and author of the best-selling documentary (and book by the same name), “The World According Monsanto,” said: “This International Citizens’ Tribunal is necessary because the defense of the safety of the planet and the conditions of life on Earth is everyone’s concern. Only through a collective resurgence of all living forces will we stop the engine of destruction. That’s why today I am calling on all citizens of the world to participate in this exemplary tribunal.”

Also speaking at the conference were Valerie Cabanes, lawyer and spokesperson for End Ecocide on Earth; Hans Rudolf Herren, president and CEO of the Millennium Institute, president and founder of Biovision, and member of the RI Steering Committee; Arnaud Apoteker, creator of the anti-GMO campaign in France, which became one of the priority campaigns of Greenpeace France, and author of “Fish in Our Strawberries: Our Manipulated Food;” and Olivier De Schutter, co-chair of the International Panel of Experts on Sustainable Food Systems (IPESFood) and former UN Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food.

Full list of founding organizations (so far) here.

Full list of Monsanto Tribunal Foundation organizing members here.

More information will be available at www.monsanto-tribunal.org/, after 2:30 p.m. EU time on December 3, 2015.

 

http://sustainablepulse.com/2015/12/03/monsanto-put-on-trial-for-crimes-against-humanity-in-the-hague/#.VmCx6r9RoSd

Neuroscientist Exposes Dangers of Electromagnetic Fields


Electromagnetic Killing Fields / image source

Kevin Samson
Activist Post

Neuroscience has come under scrutiny for its involvement in an array of mind control initiatives and other ethically questionable research. But at least one neuroscientist from Sweden has gone on record to caution against the increasing dangers of Electromagnetic Fields (EMF) on human beings and other living organisms, as you will see in the presentation below.

Our modern world is creating an electromagnetic soup filled with electrical pulses, radio frequencies, computer screens, wireless signals, as well as personal devices such as cell phones and gadgets that are emitting damaging radiation. There are many peer-reviewed scientific studies which are drawing conclusions that should concern us all, but particularly young children and pregnant women. In fact, the debate is heating up to such a level that government agencies are even infighting over the matter, as evidenced when the Department of the Interior recently sent a letter with their own scientific papers chastising the FCC for using standards that are 30 years out of date. As the DOI stated, the concern is not only in the negative health effects upon people, but upon wildlife as well.

Please listen to Professor Olle Johansson, PhD as he offers a comprehensive view of the many issues surrounding EMFs, including an industry-wide attempt by telecom to cover up the negative consequences. His information is echoed by the recent reversal of a ruling in Maine which had everything to do with industry pressure and influence. Professor Johansson also addresses what we can do to protect ourselves and our environment from the impact of EMFs.

Dr. Johansson is Associate Professor in the Neuroscience department of the world-renowned Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden. This presentation was filmed at a technical seminar on the Environment and Health in Barcelona, Spain. It is a key presentation, as he is speaking to medical practitioners, not only to a lay audience. Nevertheless, it’s a very straightforward and easily understood lecture. Particularly troubling is his opening sequence which recounts the long history of known negative health effects.

Protect Yourself From Cell Phone Radiation - SafeSpace Cell Phone ProtectorHe also asserts that all people are hypersensitive to EMFs and are being radiated in the classical way that we would think of as related to major events such as Fukushima. The health effects are long term – including DNA fragmentation – and also must be addressed as a cumulative threat.

At the very least, Professor Johansson asserts, EMFs very easily can be linked to a growing number of allergies, and he urges us to re-evaluate the rise in allergic conditions in tandem with the rise in the use of electronic devices.

Please share this information and help your friends and family make better informed decisions in a world of increased connectivity. Professor Johansson is no Luddite, but a concerned scientist who would like to see a full open debate based on the very troubling scientific health studies he cites.

This video can help to start a debate in your local community and government, before the lowest standards possible continue to be applied to human health and the environment. If you find yourself grappling with the apathy of others, I’d like to leave you with a quote:

When I die, I want the last thought to be I did my best; not I could have done better.Professor Olle Johansson 

Hat tip: Stop Smartmeters UK

http://www.activistpost.com/2014/04/neuroscientist-exposes-dangers-of.html

Coiled Serpent ~ Bill Donahue


Bill Donahue http://www.hiddenmeanings.com
Visit the web site to review Bills written work
The Play List has Bills videos sorted by category
Bills e mail is bdona910782000@yahoo.com

Oil impact on dolphins


news/2010_jan/bottlenose

December 2013: In Louisiana’s Barataria Bay Bottlenose dolphins are five times more likely to suffer from lung damage and adrenal hormone abnormalities than any other dolphin populations as a result of the Deepwater Horizon spill, scientists have discovered.

 

Twenty-nine of the total 32 dolphins sampled in Barataria Bay received comprehensive physical examinations, including ultrasound examinations to assess lung condition and researchers assigned almost half (48 percent) of the dolphins a guarded or worse prognosis. In fact, they classified 17 percent as being in poor or grave condition, meaning the dolphins were not expected to survive.

 

The researchers also found that 25 percent of the Barataria Bay dolphins were significantly underweight and the population overall had very low levels of adrenal hormones, which are critical for responding to stress.

 

These findings are in contrast to dolphins sampled in Sarasota Bay, Florida, an area not oiled by the Deepwater Horizon spill. For Dr. Lori Schwacke, the study’s lead author and veteran of a number of similar dolphin health studies across the southeast, the findings are troubling: “I’ve never seen such a high prevalence of very sick animals — and with unusual conditions such as the adrenal hormone abnormalities.”

 

The study was conducted in August 2011 as part of the Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) by a team of government, academic and non-governmental researchers and results were published were published December 2013 in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

http://www.wildlifeextra.com/go/news/oil-impact-on-dolphins.html#cr

 

25 more dead dolphins washed up over the weekend; Total now 164


Posted on: 6:15 pm, August 19, 2013, by , updated on: 09:06am, August 20, 2013

//

News story: VIDEO LINK
For weeks, Susan Barco and her team at the Virginia Aquarium have been trying to stay on top of the 6-7 dead dolphins washing up every day. Still, even they have a breaking point–and it came this weekend.

“It went crazy, we had 11 calls on Saturday, 14 on Sunday, and two of them were live animals,” said Barco. “We are having to put animals in freezers, and we are already having people come from outside to help with necropsies, because just picking up the animals is challenging us right now.”

25 were reported this weekend and three more on Monday which brings the total number of dead dolphins in Virginia to 164 for the year.

That’s 100 more than researchers see in a normal year.

“25 dolphins in one weekend is something we cannot handle, and if it continues at this rate, we are going to have to ask for more outside help,” said Barco.

The affected dolphins are no longer just males and calves, females are also starting to die from the mystery illness.

The freezers at the stranding center are now full with dead dolphins being stacked out in the open waiting for their necropsies.

Experts from the Smithsonian and NOAA are traveling to Virginia Beach to help, but it’s still not enough.

“That’s just for necropsies, that’s not getting animals off the beach, so we need more people to do that,” said Barco.

But it’s hard to bring in more trained people without money.

The aquarium’s stranding team funding has been drained after responding to so many deaths.

“We are applying for an emergency grant, but there is not a lot of extra money, and in fact this grant that supports the stranding network is scheduled to be cut because of sequestration, so we are really worried about the future, and worried about the rest of this year,” said Barco.

Twelve fresh animals have come into the lab so far, one this weekend that was still alive, and had to be euthanized.

Crews worked on it for almost 8 hours Monday, trying to get as many samples as possible, so they can finally figure out what is killing all these dolphins.

“A live animal right now is probably going to be the one that helps us solve this problem,” said Barco.

http://wtkr.com/2013/08/19/25-dead-dolphins-wash-up-over-weekend-makes-164-deaths-this-year-in-va/

 

Bee Alert! A Cause to Celebrate and Capitalize


honey_bee

19th May 2013

By Jack Adam Weber

Contributing Writer for Wake Up World

We have cause to celebrate! Brighter days for honeybees are around the corner. The EU (European Union) is set to enact the first continent-wide ban on a dangerous class of pesticides known as neocitninoids, or “neonics,” that have been unequivocally linked to declining bee populations.

It is also important that we capitalize on this milestone victory. Please urge the EPA to ban neonicotinoid pesticides by taking a moment to sign the petition here.

Bees have been dying off in droves in the U.S. since 2006. A growing body of scientific evidence points to neonicotinoid pesticides as a key contributing factor, along with pathogens and habitat loss. Neonicotinoids continue to be used in the US, despite the widespread evidence that they are killing off bee populations. With beekeepers in this country reporting record-breaking bee losses this year—up to 40% or more—action to protect honeybees is more urgent than ever.

Three neonic pesticides—including thiamethoxam, clothianidin and imidacloprid—create an unacceptable risk to bees. All three will be banned from use in the EU for two years on flowering crops such as corn, oilseed rape (aka, Canola), and sunflowers, which bees pollinate. Note that the first of these two crops, corn and Canola, are GMO crops. Nenonics are heavily employed by the biotech industry.

Bees and other insects are crucial food production. They pollinate three-quarters of all crops worldwide. A series of high-profile scientific studies has linked neonicotinoids to huge losses in the number of queen bees produced and big rises in the numbers of “disappeared” bees, those that fail to return from foraging trips.

The chemical industry has voiced concern that a ban on neonicotinoids would lead to the return of older, more harmful pesticides and crop losses. But activists and supporters of the ban point out this has not occurred during temporary bans in France, Italy and Germany. Further, it has been argued that the use of natural pest predators and regular crop rotation can make up for the difference.

Bayer and Syngenta, two companies that produce and promote the neonicotinoids, as well as GMO crops, unsurprisingly argue that the pesticides are safe for bees. However, this is not the consensus of the scientific community. It was also recently revealed that the minister of agriculture for the UK was involved in intense secret lobbying with Syngenta.

Prof Simon Potts, a bee expert at the University of Reading, said: “The ban is excellent news for pollinators. The weight of evidence from researchers clearly points to the need to have a phased ban of neonicotinoids. There are several alternatives to using neonicotinoids and farmers will benefit from healthy pollinator populations as they provide substantial economic benefits to crop pollination.”

It’s a good day for bees! Please celebrate and capitalize by signing the petition here to ban neonics in the USA.

Notes

The countries that voted against the ban were: the UK, Czech Republic, Italy, Hungary, Romania, Slovakia, Austria and Portugal.

Ireland, Lithuania, Finland and Greece abstained.

Belgium, Bulgaria, Denmark, Estonia, Spain, France, Cyprus, Germany, Latvia, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Poland, Slovenia and Sweden voted for the ban.

Article Sources:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2013/apr/29/bee-harming-pesticides-banned-europe

http://action.panna.org/p/dia/action/public

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2013/apr/28/europe-insecticides-ban-save-bees

About the Author

Jack Adam Weber is a licensed acupuncturist, master herbalist, author, organic farmer, celebrated poet, and activist for Earth-centered spirituality. He integrates poetry, ancient wisdom, holistic medicine, and depth psychology into passionate presentations for personal fulfillment as a path to planetary transformation. His books, artwork, and provocative poems can be found at his website PoeticHealing.com. Jack can be reached at Jack@PoeticHealing.com or on Facebook.

Source

 

Trapping of millions of birds in Egypt threatens European bird populations ~ Migratory murder on Egypt’s coast!


Note: The only way to stop this insanely inhumane practice is with enough people voicing their outrage and boycotting restaurants that offer migratory birds on the menu. Help spread the word, PLEASE SHARE FREELY…mahalo!

© NABU
The nets stretch approximately 700 kilometres from the Libyan border almost to Gaza

May 2013. Disturbing evidence has emerged from the Mediterranean coast of Egypt: Bavarian Broadcasting have documented a total of 700 kilometres of nets set to catch birds. The birds are then offered as a delicacy in markets and restaurants across Egypt.

The nets are very difficult to avoid for many migratory birds as they form a barrier across their flight path either across the Mediterranean or the Sahara when they are looking for a place to rest. The exact number of birds caught in this way can only be estimated, but experts believe that tens of millions are killed each year.

That songbirds are on the menu (and targeted by many hunters) in many countries of southern Europe and North Africa is nothing new. The existence of fishing nets on the coast of Egypt has long been known, but what is new is the scale of netting, which now extends from Libya across almost the entire coastline of the Egypt to the Sinai – interrupted only in a few places by military installations or major cities.

© NABU
The few birds that escape the nets are often caught by the gun.

Catching birds in Egypt threatens European populations

This form of bird trapping is mostly illegal in Egypt; there are statutory requirements for minimum distances between the nets and maximum stipulated heights but these are largely ignored. Egypt has also signed international agreements on the protection of birds, but the resulting rules are not enforced at all.

Lars Lachmann, bird expert of NABU (Nature and Biodiversity Conservation Union, one of the oldest and largest environment associations in Germany.) states that the implications of bird trapping in Egypt to the European breeding population are not good: “The majority of our species are suffering from habitat loss and climate change; species such as willow warbler, nightingale, wheatear and nightjar will be adversely affected by the massive catch in Egypt.”

Help the fight against this trapping

Any donations will go to NABU’s partner organization “Nature Conservation Egypt” to enable it to campaign locally, through regular monitoring of the extent of bird trapping and also to develop specific projects to prevent bird trapping.

http://www.sott.net/article/261951-Trapping-of-millions-of-birds-in-Egypt-threatens-European-bird-populations

 

One-Third of U.S. Honeybee colonies died last winter, threatening food supply


 

 

© Jennifer C/Flickr

Nearly one in three commercial honeybee colonies in the United States died or disappeared last winter, an unsustainable decline that threatens the nation’s food supply.

Multiple factors – pesticides, fungicides, parasites, viruses and malnutrition – are believed to cause the losses, which were officially announced today by a consortium of academic researchers, beekeepers and Department of Agriculture scientists.

“We’re getting closer and closer to the point where we don’t have enough bees in this country to meet pollination demands,” said entomologist Dennis vanEngelstorp of the University of Maryland, who led the survey documenting the declines.

Beekeepers lost 31 percent of their colonies in late 2012 and early 2013, roughly double what’s considered acceptable attrition through natural causes. The losses are in keeping with rates documented since 2006, when beekeeper concerns prompted the first nationwide survey of honeybee health. Hopes raised by drop in rates of loss to 22 percent in 2011-2012 were wiped out by the new numbers.

© Engelstorp et al.
Honeybee colony losses over the last seven years

The honeybee shortage nearly came to a head in March in California, when there were barely enough bees to pollinate the almond crop.

Had the weather not been ideal, the almonds would have gone unpollinated – a taste, as it were, of a future in which honeybee problems are not solved.

“If we want to grow fruits and nuts and berries, this is important,” said vanEngelstorp. “One in every three bites [of food consumed in the U.S.] is directly or indirectly pollinated by bees.”

Scientists have raced to explain the losses, which fall into different categories. Some result from what’s called colony collapse disorder, a malady first reported in 2006 in which honeybees abandon their hives and vanish. Colony collapse disorder, or CCD, subsequently became a public shorthand for describing bee calamities.

Most losses reported in the latest survey, however, don’t actually fit the CCD profile. And though CCD is largely undocumented in western Europe, honeybee losses there have also been dramatic. In fact, CCD seems to be declining, even as total losses mount. The honeybees are simply dying.

“Even if CCD went away, we’d still have tremendous losses,” said entomologist Diana Cox-Foster at Pennsylvania State University. “CCD losses are like the straw that breaks the camel’s back. The system has many other issues.”

Studying these issues isn’t easy. In real-world agricultural settings, it’s hard to run the rigorous, every-last-variable-controlled experiments on which definitive conclusions are founded. These experiments can be run in labs and small-scale test fields, but whether those accurately reflect real-world complexity is debated.

Amidst the uncertainties, scientific attention has settled on a group of culprits, the most high-profile of which is a class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids. These were developed in the 1990s, rushed to market with minimal studies of potential harms, and subsequently became the world’s most-used pesticides.

In the last several years, it’s become evident that neonicotinoids are extremely toxic to honeybees and, even in small, sub-lethal doses, make bees more vulnerable to disease. The European Union recently limited neonicotinoid use, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is reviewing their use.

Pesticide companies have fought the restrictions, arguing that neonicotinoids are unfairly blamed. Most non-industry scientists say the question isn’t whether neonicotinoids are a problem, but where they fit into a constellation of problems.

“Different studies indicate that this class of pesticide is rather harmful to the bees,” said honeybee pathologist Cédric Alaux of the French National Institute for Agricultural Research, who said the E.U.’s restrictions are sensible. “However, we should not be too naive and think that it will solve the bee problem.”

Just as important as neonicotinoids, and perhaps more so, are Varroa destructor mites. First detected in the United States in 1987, the mites weaken bees by sucking their hemolyph, the insect analogue of blood, and also transmit viruses and other parasites. A recent USDA report called Varroa “the single most detrimental pest of honey bees.”

The report also noted that neonicotinoid exposure alters immune system function in Varroa-infected bees and makes bees more vulnerable to infection by Nosema ceranae, another parasite implicated in honeybee losses. It’s possible that neonicotinoids used on crops don’t usually kill bees outright, but weaken them enough for other stresses to become lethal.

Agricultural entomologist Christian Krupke of Purdue University likened the effects to “living in an area with extreme levels of smog, causing your body and immune system to become overtaxed so that a common cold progresses to pneumonia.”

Krupke noted that although neonicotinoids are the most common poisonous chemicals in honeybee environments, they’re far from the only chemicals. Cox-Foster and vanEngelstorp stressed that point, referencing research that found 121 different pesticides in honeybee hives. On average, each hive contained traces of 6 pesticides, and sometimes several dozen.

Research on pesticide interactions is in its infancy, but combinations may be extremely harmful to bees, amplifying what the chemicals would do alone. “I worry that the neonicotinoid attention is distracting from the other pesticides that have clear effects, and might even have stronger effects. Things like fungicides are completely unregulated for bees,” said vanEngelstorp. “I think we need to keep the pesticide investigation broader.”

Another, less-appreciated aspect of honeybee life also gained attention in the winter survey and new USDA report: what they eat. Though commercial bees are trucked on pollination circuits around the United States, most beekeepers have home bases in the upper Midwest, an area that’s undergone significant changes in recent years.

Rising food prices led farmers to plant crops in fields previously considered marginal or set aside as grasslands. Honeybees forage in those grasslands, and can’t get the nutrition they need from flowering crops alone.

Add the record-setting drought of summer 2012, and bees were hard-pressed for nourishment. Malnourishment could in turn make bees more vulnerable to pests and infections, or exacerbate the effects of pesticides.

“The drought, the possible combination of factors that went with it, was clearly a big problem for a lot of beekeepers,” vanEngelstorp said. “In some cases, it was a combination of Varroa and these malnourished, pesticide-exposed bees.”

Commercial bees pollinate dozens of crops, and though colonies can be replaced, continuing losses could soon render beekeeping economically unviable. Researchers are trying to breed more resilient bees, but the combination of chemicals, nutrition and disease will likely prove insurmountable by genetic improvements alone, said Cox-Foster.

She said native pollinator habitat needs to be left intact or re-established; a field that goes unplanted, or a roadside left unmowed, can be thought of as insurance against commercial honeybee loss. Dennis vanEngelstorp recommended that, as a rule of thumb, 10 percent of land mass should be managed as pollinator havens.

Pesticides can also be used more carefully. Rather than being applied broadly, across entire fields and locales, they can be precisely targeted to outbreaks. Other unnecessary uses can be averted.

“Many entomologists and pest management professionals have been saying for years that there is no pest management justification for using these insecticides on virtually every crop grown in North America,” said Krupke. “Yet, the opposite trend is occurring.”

The honeybee catastrophe could also signal problems in other pollinator species, such as bumblebees and butterflies, that are not often studied.

“Thinking of honeybees as our canary in the coal mine, a monitor for environmental conditions, is very appropriate,”Cox-Foster said. “With honeybee colonies, you have the ability to open them up and see what’s going on. There are many other species needed for pollination, but with most of those, we don’t have the ability to see what’s happening.”

Update 5/9: Francesco Nazzi, an entomologist at Italy’s University of Udine who studies the interactions of pests, parasites and honeybee immune systems, said he feels neonicotinoid pesticides “are not the major cause of widespread colony losses but one of many different causes, whose incidence may vary according to the local situation.”

Nazzi pointed to surveys of honeybee losses in Canada, China, Israel, Turkey and western Europe, which have varied widely by locale and circumstance, with no clear explanation. In the European Union, where neonicotinoid use will be decreased but not eliminated for the next two years, Nazzi does not expect to see any clear, black-and-white effect.

Evidence about potential neonicotinoid harm, though, is “convincing enough to suggest caution,” he said. “One may say that a broader ban may not be sufficient on its own to ‘save’ the bees, but it could help.” Nazzi said the crucial question is whether neonicotinoid is even needed. “At least in Italy, in most cases, their use is actually unnecessary,” he said

http://www.sott.net/article/261668-One-Third-of-US-Honeybee-colonies-died-last-winter-threatening-food-supply

 

The plan to kill orangutans


 

510,308 have signed. Let’s get to 1,000,000

 

Posted: 8 May 2013
I live and work in the last place on Earth where endangered orangutans, rhinos, elephants, and tigers still roam together — but it’ll be bulldozed to bits unless our President hears our call and steps in to save this unique habitat.

Right now in one of Indonesia’s most pristine and untouched forests, a local Governor wants to let mining and palm oil companies move in to decimate areas the size of a million football fields! And the national Forestry Ministry looks like it might let him unless the President steps in to reject this orangutan-killing plan.

We know the President wants to be seen as a keen conservationist, but we need to tell him his green reputation and possible future UN aspirations are on the line to ensure he does the right thing. We need to act fast — sign the urgent petition and tell everyone about this mortal threat to our majestic forest. If a million people sign in the next 3 days, I’ll ensure the President hears us!

Rudi Putra, Indonesia. 2013 winner of Future for Nature award.

SIGN HERE

THANK YOU!!

 

Thousands of birds crash land at Dugway Proving Ground


By , Deseret News

Published: Monday, April 15 2013

Staff at Dugway Proving Grounds found several hundred struggling and dead Eared Grebes birds Monday, April 15, 2013. The birds were looking for water and were apparently fooled by the snowstorm. Once they land, the birds apparently cannot take off without water due to their body structure.

Derek Petersen, Deseret News

 

 

DUGWAY PROVING GROUND — Wildlife biologists are on the scene of an unusual natural disaster.

 

A huge flock of birds thought they were making a splash-down in water Monday morning, but instead crash landed on hard ground at Dugway Proving Ground.

 

As many as 5,000 birds hit the ground, and about a third of them died from the impact.

 

A group of Eared Grebes, a kind of migratory water fowl also known as Black-necked Grebes, stage at the Great Salt Lake. They are currently at the peak of their migration season. These waterfowl were looking for water and were fooled by the snowstorm. Because of the birds’ body structure, they cannot take off without water.

 

The challenge has not only been to clean up the area, but to rescue whatever birds can be rescued. Many have broken wings and legs. So far, approximately 2,000 birds have been rescued.

 

“We want to save as many as we can, responsibly collect them, handle them and release them,” said Robbie Knight with Dugway Proving Ground. The surviving birds are being transported as quickly as possible to the nearest water, which is a smaller pond on base.

 

From there, biologists say it’ll take the birds, which still got soaked in the ordeal, about 24 to 48 hours to dry off to their normal state, preen and take flight again.

 

Dugway’s Environmental Programs Office, along with the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services. are working together to save the birds.

 

“Whether they want to land on a wet asphalt surface that looks a lot like a lake, or the weather just pushes them to the ground, whatever pushes them down, they end up in large numbers on the ground,” Knight said.

 

The birds that did not survive will be picked and transported later. To report sightings of birds, call 435-831-3448.

 

Experts said such an incident is not that unusual Scientists say it happens perhaps every couple of years somewhere in the state.

 

In December 2011, thousands of migratory birds were killed or injured after apparently mistaking a Wal-Mart parking lot in Cedar City, a football field and other snow-covered areas in southern Utah as bodies of water. They plummeted to the ground and crashed. More than 3,000 birds were rescued, but as many as 1,500 died.

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/865578300/Thousands-of-bird-crash-land-at-Dugway-Proving-Ground.html

Editorial from JumpinJackFlashHypothesis.blogspot.com

Note: The official explanation is that the birds thought they were landing on water. If they flew through some methane and/or hydrogen sulfide then they might get disoriented and crash out of the sky too. The only way to know the actual cause would be to test the birds (which they didn’t) or to ask the birds (which they can’t). Ergo, they’re guessing…

Dead dolphins and shrimp with no eyes found after BP clean-up


 

 

Chemicals used to disperse Gulf of Mexico spill blamed for marine deaths and human illness

Hundreds of beached dolphin carcasses, shrimp with no eyes, contaminated fish, ancient corals caked in oil and some seriously unwell people are among the legacies that scientists are still uncovering in the wake of BP’s Deepwater Horizon spill.

This week it will be three years since the first of 4.9 billion barrels of crude oil gushed into the Gulf of Mexico, in what is now considered the largest marine oil spill in the history of the petroleum industry. As the scale of the ecological disaster unfolds, BP is appearing daily in a New Orleans federal court to battle over the extent of compensation it owes to the region.

Infant dolphins were found dead at six times average rates in January and February of 2013. More than 650 dolphins have been found beached in the oil spill area since the disaster began, which is more than four times the historical average. Sea turtles were also affected, with more than 1,700 found stranded between May 2010 and November 2012 – the last date for which information is available. On average, the number stranded annually in the region is 240.

Contact with oil may also have reduced the number of juvenile bluefin tuna produced in 2010 by 20 per cent, with a potential reduction in future populations of about 4 per cent. Contamination of smaller fish also means that toxic chemicals could make their way up the food chain after scientists found the spill had affected the cellular function of killifish, a common bait fish at the base of the food chain.

Deep sea coral, some of which is thousands of years old, has been found coated in oil after the dispersed droplets settled on the sea’s bottom. A recent laboratory study found that the mixture of oil and dispersant affected the ability of some coral species to build new parts of a reef.

Doug Inkley, a senior scientist for the US National Wildlife Federation and author of a report published this week on wildlife affected by the spill, said: “These ongoing deaths – particularly in an apex predator such as the dolphin – are a strong indication that there is something amiss with the Gulf ecosystem.”

Scientists believe that the 1.8 million gallons of dispersant, sprayed as part of the clean-up, have cemented the disaster’s toxic effect on ocean life and human health. The dispersant, called Corexit, caused what some scientists have described as “a giant black snowstorm” of tiny oil globules, which has been carried around the ocean in plumes and has now settled on the sea floor. A study last November found the dispersant to be 52 times more toxic than the oil itself.

Larry McKinney, director of the Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies, said: “Before we depend on dispersants to get rid of oil and get it out of sight, we need to understand what it can do in the open ocean. We’re told to keep oil off the shore and away from estuaries, but we’ve not dealt with something like this before, that’s in the open ocean and gone from top to bottom, affecting the whole water column.”

Scientists believe the addition of dispersants to the oil made it more easily absorbed through the gills of fish and into the bloodstream. Dr William Sawyer, a toxicologist, has studied concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbon (PHC) in edible fish and shellfish in the region. Samples before the spill had no measurable PHC in the tissue, whereas fish tested in recent months show tissue concentrations as high as 10,000 parts per million, or 1 per cent of all tissue. He said: “The study shows that the absorption [of the oil] was enhanced by the Corexit.”

BP says the dispersants it used are “government approved and safe when used appropriately”, and that extensive testing has shown seafood in the Gulf states is safe to eat.

Louisiana State University’s Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences has found sea life in the Gulf with lesions and deformities that it believes may be linked to the use of dispersants. These include shrimp with no eyes and crabs with no eyes or without claws. BP claims these abnormalities are “common in marine life”, had been seen in the region before, and are caused by bacterial infections or parasites.

In a blow to the region’s tourism, tar balls continue to wash up along the affected coastline, which now stretches from the beaches of Louisiana to Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. Marco Kaltofen, a chemical engineer at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute, said: “We have a reservoir of petroleum and petroleum-contaminated sediment that lies just offshore of several Gulf beaches. Every time we have a storm, all of a sudden you’re getting these tar balls washing up.”

It is not just wildlife that scientists believe has been affected. Michael Robichaux, a Louisiana doctor, has documented 113 patients who he thinks were made ill by exposure to chemicals associated with the spill. Their most common symptoms include headaches, memory loss, fatigue, irritability, vertigo, nausea, blurred vision and insomnia.

One of Dr Robichaux’s patients, Jorey Danos, 32, is a formerly healthy father of three. Since working for BP on the clean-up, he says he has experienced serious ill health, including severe abdominal and joint pain that has left him walking with a cane. Several doctors, including a neurologist, have put his condition down to the neurological impact of exposure to the chemicals related to the spill.

Mr Danos said: “I worked 21 days in one of the boats skimming the oil and we were sprayed directly with Corexit from above on three occasions. My skin came out with bumps and burning and I started having breathing problems. When a speedboat with BP representatives came by I asked for a respirator but they said no, because it would lead to bad media attention. Now I’m still dealing with it three years later.” BP said all workers were provided with safety training and protective equipment and would have had the opportunity to join a class action settlement.

Geoff Morrell, BP’s head of US communications, said: “No company has done more to respond to an industrial accident than BP has in the US Gulf of Mexico.”

http://www.sott.net/article/260843-Dead-dolphins-and-shrimp-with-no-eyes-found-after-BP-clean-up

 

Rare birds killed off after migration north sees them face freezing temperatures back in UK


 

 

Remains of 8 malnourished stone curlews recently back from Africa and Spain found in Norfolk, Suffolk and Wiltshire

The stone curlew is one of the UK’s most threatened birds and has recently returned from their wintering grounds in Africa and Spain

Rare birds have fallen victim to Britain’s prolonged cold weather with the bodies of several breeds found dead across the country.

The remains of eight malnourished stone curlews – one of the UK’s most threatened birds, recently returned from their wintering grounds in Africa and Spain – were discovered in fields in Norfolk, Suffolk and Wiltshire in the past few days, the RSPB has reported.

The malnourished creatures, which weighed around 300g each compared to a healthy weight of 450g, are believed to have died after struggling to find enough food to survive following their annual migration to the UK.

A number of puffins and other seabirds including razorbills and guillemots were found dead off the coast of Scotland and North East England two weeks ago as a result of continuous freezing conditions and stormy seas making it hard to find food.

There have also been reports of short-eared owls and barn owls found dead after cold weather hindered their ability to hunt.

The late onset of spring has meant a lack of activity usual for this time of year. An influx of migrant birds should be returning to British shores to breed and build nests, but conservationists have noted very little activity. There has been a much lower number of sightings of chiffchaffs, willow warblers and blackcaps than is usual for this time of year, which is worrying given last year’s poor breeding season.

A number of birds have been confused by lower than normal temperatures. Winter migrants like waxwings, fieldfares and redwings are still present in large numbers across the countryside, showing little sign of preparing to head north. Starling murmurations – traditionally a winter evening spectacle – were recorded as late as the Easter weekend in areas including Swindon and Aberystwyth Pier.

RSPB conservation director Martin Harper said: “I can’t remember a spring like this – nature has really been tested by a prolonged period of very cold weather.

“We should be hearing the sound of chiffchaffs calling from the trees – a classic sign that spring is here – but that isn’t the case. Some may have stalled on their migration route, while for others the severe lack of insect food available means they are conserving what little energy they have.

“The discovery of eight stone curlews is a stark reminder of how fragile this species is. This amounts to around one per cent of the total UK population of these birds but the total number of deaths is likely to be higher. Many of these birds are only here because of the dedication of farmers who have been creating safe habitats for them in key areas.”

http://www.sott.net/article/260734-Rare-birds-killed-off-after-migration-north-sees-them-face-freezing-temperatures-back-in-UK
Note: When I first began awakening in 2007, one of the indicators that Earth is coming to the end of a cycle was learning that mass extinctions began a century ago before the population explosion began infringing on natural habitats, and before industrial pollution and toxic chemical cocktails overtook the land, air and seas. For everything there is a season, as we close the last Great Year cycle (26,000yrs) we must remember that our Earth Mother has a Divine plan for all creatures large and small, she’s done this before on several occasions and came out with entirely new species after the shifting events. Gaia has a plan so magnificent it’s absolutely blinding in it’s brilliance, therefore it’s impossible for us to see from our limited perspective.
A spiritually grounded culture would’ve recognized the “signs” 100 years ago and would have begun to prepare for the changes we’re seeing now in a fashion that would help our Great Earth Mother gently move through the unfolding shift. Instead we’re waking up at the final hour, with little time for the masses to prepare. Therefore those of us who are awakened must carry the torch for the greater good, with an understanding that everything is as it should be as the Divine plan unfolds. Thankfully Gaia has an inter-dimensional management team working hard to move her thru the shift with as little loss of human life as possible, as well as helping the nature kingdom make the transition over the Rainbow Bridge to the other side.
For myself, being a highly sensitive empath the mass animal and bird kills have been one of the most difficult issues to understand and come to terms with. I still have occasional meltdowns and am particularly sensitive to cetacean and bird deaths, but at the same time I also “see” a Higher purpose and understand in my heart that God has a marvelous plan for all souls, that it’s always darkest before the dawn. Much love to all…

Gulf Authorities “Silenced” on Spike in Baby Dolphin Deaths, Dead Sea Lions “Everywhere” in Los Angeles, Dead Manatees in Florida…


For anyone who hasn’t noticed, the elephant has entered the room. Does this mean we’ve reached a tipping point, is this obvious rash of deaths the beginning of environmental collapse? I don’t have the answer, but it sure looks grim without Divine Intervention factored in at some point in the near future. Even if the masses rose up against the PTW tomorrow, we don’t have the technology to “fix” the environmental damage. All we could possibly do is stop the destruction from the power industry’s and chemtrail distribution and let nature go through her natural cleansing process, catastrophic or not she may have to turn and burn some earth before she’s finished clearing away the toxins, but so be it.

Instead of posting all the articles I included links below for anyone interested in details, the titles alone were enough for me after following stories on Fukushima radiation and the BP Gulf oil “catastrophe” that was followed by dumping millions of gallons of Corexit in the waters – an environmental crime still being carried out over the waters of the Gulf today. The people responsible for this are criminally negligent, psychopaths who deserve nothing less than life in jail for their crimes against every living creature on this planet, they deserve the same mercy given toward victims of their perpetual malfeasance.

Published: March 29th, 2013 at 12:39 pm ET
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Title: Spike in marine mammal strandings documented along La., Miss. coast
Source: WWL
Date: March 20, 2013 at 6:12 PM

Angela Hill, Anchor: […] Now experts say we’re seeing an unusual spike in dead dolphins washing up in both Louisiana and Mississippi. […]

Dr. Moby Solangi, executive director of the Institute for Marine Mammal Studies in Gulfport: Yes, we have seen a spike in dolphin strandings. […]

Maya Rodriguez, Reporter: Since the start of this year strandings have been climbing, with 29 in Louisiana and 23 in Mississippi so far.

Solangi: The unusual part in Mississippi is that 18 of the 23 are baby dolphins. […]

Rodriguez: Answers are tough to come by. Dr. Solangi said because of the ongoing investigation and litigation involving the BP oil spill, they can’t share their findings.

Solangi: We have been advised not to discuss our findings or any results from our necropsies or analysis […]

See also: “Manatees Dying in Droves on Both Coasts of Florida” — Deaths of pelicans, turtles, dolphins also increasing — “Scientists fear this is the beginning of a devastating ecosystem collapse”

LATEST HEADLINES

Pilot whales beach in South Africa


Six of 19 pilot whales that were stranded Sunday on a beach in the South African city of Cape Town have died and authorities said they planned to euthanize some of the surviving whales.

By CHRISTOPHER TORCHIA

Associated Press

JOHANNESBURG —Six of 19 pilot whales that were stranded Sunday on a beach in the South African city of Cape Town have died and authorities said they planned to euthanize some of the surviving whales.

Police and other rescue workers had hosed down the surviving whales at Noordhoek Beach to try to keep them alive.

The South African Press Association quoted Craig Lambinon, a spokesman for the National Sea Rescue Institute, as saying authorities had considered whether to try and refloat the whales, which washed up on the beach on Sunday morning.

“Seven are in poor health,” SAPA quoted Lambinon as saying. “We are still trying our best to save them, but those that can’t be saved will be humanely euthanized.”

One whale was being transported to a naval base and will be taken out to sea, according to authorities.

“At this stage the first whale is on its way on a trailer to the naval base,” Lambinon said. “There are a remaining five whales in good health and we are going to attempt to do the same for them.”

He appealed to the public to stay away from the beach because enough workers are there, trying to help the whales.

In 2009, authorities in the Cape Town area removed the carcasses of 55 whales that beached themselves and had to be shot despite the frantic rescue efforts of hundreds of volunteers.

http://seattletimes.com/html/nationworld/2020629682_apafsouthafricabeachedwhales.html?syndication=rss

 

 

Signs Of Change The Past Week Or So March 2013 Part 3


Published on Mar 19, 2013

HawkkeyDavisChannelHawkkeyDavisChannel

The extreme events of 2013 do continue. Floods, landslides, dead fish and more has taking place the past week or so. These videos do not mean that the world will end. Please respect other peoples comments and beliefs when leaving a comment. Thanks for watching here and be safe all!

Music
1…. Epic Score — Someday I’ll Be Redeemed
2…. KMP Music — Sea Of Neptune

My channel on FB
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Hawkkey…

Thank you Julie and others at Weird Weather Group on FB for keeping up on extreme weather events.
https://www.facebook.com/groups/Weird…

Watch More Of This Series From The Playlist
http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=…

I do not own any of these videos thanks to all the people who film these disasters and the news medias that report them.
FAIR USE NOTICE: This video may contain copyrighted material. Such material is made available for educational purposes only. This constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in Title 17 U.S.C. section 107 of the US Copyright Law.

 

More weirdness – Thousands of dead prawns and crabs wash up on beach in Chile


BBC News
Wed, 20 Mar 2013
Thousands of dead prawns have washed up on a beach in Chile, sparking an investigation. Hundreds of dead crabs were also washed ashore in Coronel city, about 530km (330 miles) from the capital, Santiago.

© Reuters
Authorities are still collecting evidence to find an explanation for the red tide

Fishermen suggested the deaths may have been caused by local power stations that use seawater as a cooling agent. The power firms have not commented. Experts are looking into water temperature and oxygen levels and other details to explain the deaths.

“We’re investigating the Coronel Bay to establish the physical parameters of temperature, electric conductivity and, above all, the oxygen,” said local environment official Victor Casanova.

© Reuters
Hundreds of dead crabs were washed ashore on the weekend

Local fishermen blamed nearby power generation plants Bocamina 1 and 2 and Colbun.

“I’m 69 years old and started fishing when I was nine, but as a fisherman, I never saw a disaster of this magnitude,” Gregorio Ortega told local Radio Bio Bio.

While some blame pollution, others say the death of the crustaceans could be a consequence of the El Nino phenomenon, which warms the waters of the Pacific.

Marisol Ortega, a spokeswoman for the fishermen, said she feared the deaths would affect the livelihood of their community.

“The way everything is being destroyed here, come the high season in November, we’re already thinking we won’t have anything to take from the sea,” she said.

Note: It appears that the deaths are limited to bottom dwellers in a seismically active region, could the culprit possibly be hydrogen sulfide or heat from volcanic eruptions on the ocean floor?

Lagoon In Rio De Janeiro Is So Polluted That Thousands Of Fish Just Floated Up Dead


Here’s the scene in Rio de Janeiro…

 

This lagoon, called Rodrigo de Freitas, is where the Olympic rowing competitions will be held in 2016.  The fish died after oxygen levels in the water dropped because of pollution, local media said.

Note: Lack of oxygen mostly likely is a result of methane hydrate or hydrogen sulfide release.

 

 

Number of dead pigs flooding Shanghai river rises to nearly 6,000


Chinese officials maintain that the drinking water is still safe despite the surge in swine found in the city’s Huangpu River. The carcasses are believed to have been dumped by farmers following police efforts to halt the illegal trade of pork products from diseased pigs.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Tuesday, March 12, 2013, 3:10 PM
A dead pig floats on the river Monday, March 11, 2013 on the outskirts of Shanghai, China. A recent surge in the dumping of dead pigs upstream from Shanghai - with more than 2,800 carcasses floating into the financial hub through Monday - has followed a police campaign to curb the illicit trade in sick pig parts. (AP Photo)

AP

The Shanghai government announced on Tuesday that some 5,916 swine carcasses have been pulled from the Huangpu River.

BEIJING — The number of dead pigs found floating in a river flowing into Shanghai has reached nearly 6,000.

The Shanghai municipal government said in an online announcement that 5,916 swine carcasses had been retrieved from Huangpu River by 3 p.m. Tuesday, but added that municipal water remains safe.

PIGS13N_5_WEB

Eugene Hoshiko/AP

City officials say the municipal drinking water is still safe to consume.

The surge in the dumping of dead pigs – believed to be from pig farms in the upstream Jiaxing area in the neighboring Zhejiang province – has followed police campaigns to curb the illicit trade of pork products harvested from diseased pigs.

Shanghai authorities said the city has taken proper measures to safely dispose of the pig carcasses and that the city’s water plants are stepping up efforts to disinfect public water and testing for six common swine viruses.

PIGS13N_4_WEB

AP

Officials believe the carcasses were dumped by farmers in a neighboring province.

The Shanghai government reported no major swine epidemic, widespread pig deaths or dumping of pigs within the city boundaries of Shanghai.

The state-run China News news agency said Monday that Zhejiang province had reported no swine epidemic but that a provincial agriculture official blamed cold weather for the deaths of the pigs.

PIGS13N_3_WEB

Eugene Hoshiko/AP

Authorities check the dead pigs, not seen, which have been pulled out from the river on Monday.

The official, who was identified only by his family name Gu, told China News that the practice of dumping dead pigs into rivers lingers among some pig farmers in the city of Jiaxing. “We are still introducing the practice of collecting dead pigs,” Gu was quoted as saying.

Shanghai authorities have been pulling out the swollen and rotting pigs, some with their internal organs visible, since Friday – and revolting images of the carcasses in news reports and online blogs have raised public ire against local officials.

Beijing-based writer Li Mingsheng expressed shock when he learned of the latest number of dead pigs in Shanghai.

“This is not only an environmental issue but also a public moral problem,” Li wrote. “What’s been polluted is not only Shanghai’s river water but also the spirit of our country people.”
Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/world/number-dead-pigs-floating-shanghai-river-rises-6-000-article-1.1286389#ixzz2NPNSv000

Note: The real elephant in the room: What killed all these pigs? I saw mention of a suspected swine virus, which doesn’t make any sense unless it’s an airborne plague that has 9000 pigs dropping dead within day’s of each other.  From what I’ve learned thru researching Earth changes, it sounds like farmers are having problems with massive hydrogen sulfide releases into the environment. See jumpingjackhypothesis.blogspot.comfor more information and preventative measures.

Red tide killing record number of manatees in Florida


Brett Smith
RedOrbit
Mon, 11 Mar 2013
Manatee

© Photos.com

A red algae bloom, also known as Red Tide, is currently killing a record number of manatees living off the coast of Florida.

Last week, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) found an average of 10 dead manatees a day and some observers said the phenomenon doesn’t appear to be receding. A toxin produced by the red algae affects the nervous system of the manatees causing them to drown.

“This is probably going to be the worst die-off in history,” said Martine DeWit, veterinarian with the FWC.

DeWit noted that a confluence of factors has caused the animals to swim into a precarious situation.

“It’s a very large bloom that persisted through the winter and there are lots of manatees in the same area,” she said. “They all aggregated to the warm-water side, and that put them in the wrong place at the wrong time.”

As of Friday, state officials had this year’s number of manatee casualties pegged at 149, just two animals short of the record high mark of 151 set by a Red Tide in 1996.

The FWC and conservation groups have been racing to locate and save the slow moving marine mammals. So far, 11 manatees have been rescued and taken to Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa for treatment and resuscitation. To revive manatees that have been afflicted by the red algae toxins, zookeepers have been standing in the manatees’ tank and holding the animals’ heads out of the water so they can breathe.

“They’re basically paralyzed and they’re comatose,” said Virginia Edmonds, the zoo’s animal care manager for Florida mammals. “They could drown in 2 inches of water.”

The zookeepers have also been using flotation devices to keep the manatees from drowning. However, because the manatees often suffer from seizures in these conditions – the zoo staff made the decision to schedule three-hour shifts dedicated to holding the manatees’ heads up.

Zoo spokeswoman Rachel Nelson told the Tampa Bay Times that one particular manatee that was brought in Thursday took a long time to recover, meaning that “for 29 hours our keepers held a manatee’s head out of the water.”

Although manatees in the zoo are safe for now, officials are trying to decide what to do once they make a full recovery from the algae toxin.

“We’re making arrangements to move them to other places and stabilize them and keep them there until the Red Tide goes away,” Pat Rose, executive director of the Save the Manatee Club, told the Tampa Bay Times.

Every few years, the red algae population off the coast of Florida mysteriously explodes and the resulting bloom floods the immediate area with deadly toxins – killing off manatees and fish that live in the area.

The current Red Tide, which has been floating on the water since last fall, affects about 70 miles of the southwest Florida coast. Widespread manatee deaths were not seen until last month, according to DeWit.

“We’ll just keep taking them in,” Edmonds said. “We want to save as many as we can.”

Note: There may be a time when zoo’s become more like hospitals to care for sick and dying species, also saving for DNA of species going extinct in hopes of reviving the populations after the shift, or reset point.The dedication and commitment of Lowry Park zookeepers to save these manatees should be commended and recognized for their loving service and contribution to Natures children.

 

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