Mayan Calendar Strangeness (11th May 2012)


Dee nailed it, National Geographic is a major disinformation outlet for the Illiminati, all recognizable print media publications are controlled by the corporate elite. 96% of all media is monopolized, as soon as any publication becomes popular it silently gets purchased so the PTW can stay in control of the message.  The same thing is happening on the internet with alternative media, which is why it’s becoming more and more important to learn to go within to source the truth.

Published on May 11, 2012 by

Unprecedented Maya Mural Found, Contradicts 2012 “Doomsday” Myth: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2012/05/120510-maya-2012-doomsday-cal…

Production of Mayan documentary steeped in intrigue: http://omg.yahoo.com/news/production-mayan-documentary-steeped-intrigue-23010…

Sun May Act As A Lens Producing A Strong Focus Of Photon Energy From Pleiades: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8jifsqwT4vc&lc=zQgyMCyYMZCjdnmQTwrazYmXds3…

5-6-2012 dark hole spot on Venus very strange looking YTUL 1.wmv :http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=djDaxiyqWj0&list=UUS-D1sgC3LWID85ON481ckw&…­1&feature=plcp

Who Owns What on Television?: http://www.neatorama.com/2008/07/07/who-owns-what-on-television/

DEE SMITH FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/dee.smith.712

Scientists Stumped By Sun’s Asymmetrically Reversing Magnetic Field


Carl Franzen
Talking Points Memo
Thu, 26 Apr 2012 09:11 CDT
Sun

© NOAA/NASA
The Sun’s magnetic field is reversing, South becoming North, as it does approximately every 11 years on a cycle, but this time, something even stranger is going on: The North is moving much faster than the South, and space scientists aren’t sure why.

“Right now, there’s an imbalance between the north and the south poles,” Jonathan Cirtain, NASA’s project scientist for a Japanese solar mission called Hinode, in a recent article on NASA’s website. “The north is already in transition, well ahead of the south pole, and we don’t understand why.”

Further, the asymmetrically reversing solar magnetic field could have an effect on Earth, resulting in increased solar flares and the accompanying bursts of radioactive particles called “coronal mass ejections,” or CMEs, that can hit Earth and cause brilliant Northern Lights displays and problematic geomagnetic solar storms, according to NASA scientists.

“This usually leads to a double peak in the sunspot number and CME rate as a function of time,” Nat Gopalswamy, a solar scientist NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., in an email to TPM.

Gopalswamy and his team studied the Sun’s shifting magnetic field from microwave signatures obtained by Japanese radio telescopes and reported their findings in a paper in the Astrophysical Journal on April 9.

Gopalswamy explained that while the Sun’s shifting magnetic poles were first discovered in 1955, the rate at which the North and South wasn’t found to be mismatched until the last few solar cycles.

To be clear, the magnetic field doesn’t just flip, but rather, the Sun essentially sheds its current magnetic field and regrows a new one every 11 years. Currently, the Northern portion of the Sun is further along on this process than its Southern counterpart.

Further, the Sun’s oddly shifting magnetic field affects the Solar System, though it isn’t yet known just how.

“Whether the north pole of the Sun has north or south polarity decides the entry point of galactic cosmic rays into the heliosphere,” Gopalswamy told TPM.

The heliosphere is an enormous magnetic bubble made up of the continual regular ejection of charged particles from the Sun. It stretches beyond Pluto.

BREAKING NEWS : NSA releases 29 messages from space (via Ray Alex Website)


Interesting…

BREAKING NEWS : NSA releases 29 messages from space By the release of this Key Code document, NSA actually confess that they do have both knowledge and contact with extraterrestrials. This is a fantastic document, and it also gives you and me a bit of the code key to work with. NSA have Released 29 messages from outer space? Wednesday, 27 April 2011 First French UFO files, then the British UFO files, the FBI Vault and recently the Kennedy disclosure. And now files from the prominent US security ag … Read More

via Ray Alex Website

Radiation in Japan Seas: Risk of Animal Death, Mutation?


Main Content

Sailors wearing protective suits bring pure water to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

Aboard a boat pulling a barge with water for Japan’s overheating Fukushima nuclear plant Thursday.

Photograph from Japan Maritime Self-Defence Force via Reuters

Christine Dell’Amore

National Geographic News

Published April 1, 2011

If radioactive material from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant—disabled by the March11 Japan earthquake and tsunami—continues to enter the ocean, marine life could be threatened, experts say.

(See related photos: “Japan Tsunami: 20 Unforgettable Pictures.”)

In the past week, seawater samples taken near the nuclear power plant, on Japan‘s eastern coast, have shown elevated levels of radioactive isotopes, including cesium 137 and iodine 131, according to the New York Times. (See “Japan Tries to Avert Nuclear Disaster.”)

All life on Earth and in the oceans lives with exposure to natural levels of ionizing radiation—high-frequency radiation with enough energy to change DNA. Most such genetic damage heals, but the addition of human-made radiation can make it harder for the body to repair broken genes.

Radiation concentrations in the Japanese seawater samples have fluctuated in past days, but on Wednesday the amount of iodine spiked to 3,355 times the legal limit for seawater, Japanese nuclear safety officials told the Associated Press.

That level is the highest so far—and an indication that more radiation is entering the ocean, though how is still unknown, the agency reported. Cesium was also found to be 20 times its safety limit on March 28, according to the Times.

Radiation Can Cause “Bizarre Mutations”

Once in seawater, radiation can hurt ocean animals in several ways—by killing them outright, creating “bizarre mutations” in their offspring, or passing radioactive material up the food chain, according to Joseph Rachlin, director of Lehman College’s Laboratory for Marine and Estuarine Research in New York City.

“There will be a potential for a certain amount of lethality of living organisms, but that’s less of a concern than the possible effects on the genetics of the animals that become exposed,” Rachlin said.

“That’s the main problem as I see it with radiation—altering the genetics of the animal and interfering with reproduction.”

Even so, according to radioecologist F. Ward Whicker, the concentrations of iodine and cesium levels “would have to be orders of magnitude larger than the numbers I’ve seen to date to cause the kind of radiation doses to marine life that would cause mortality or reductions in reproductive potential.

“I am very doubtful that direct effects of radioactivity from the damaged reactors on marine life over a large area off the coast of Japan will be observed,” Whicker, professor emeritus at Colorado State University, said via email.

Likewise, using legal limits to gauge damage to marine life is of little value right now, he said.

To make a “credible assessment” of the risk to marine animals, scientists would have to know the actual concentrations of radioactive iodine in the water and fish or other marine animals off Fukushima Daiichi, he said.

Radiation Hardest on the Little Ones

It’s possible that levels of radioactive contamination near the Fukushima nuclear reactors could increase and cause some harm to local marine life, Whicker said.

“If this happens, the most likely effects would be reductions in reproductive potential of local fishes. … ,” he said.

Marine organisms’ eggs and larvae are highly sensitive to radiation, since radioactive atoms can replace other atoms in their bodies, resulting in radiation exposure that could alter their DNA, Whicker said. (Get the basics on genetics.)

Most such deformed organisms don’t survive, but some can pass abnormalities on to the next generation, Lehman College’s Rachlin said. Either way, the radiation exposure could hurt the population’s ability to survive long-term.

Rachlin thinks the most susceptible critters would be soft-bodied invertebrates such as jellyfish, sea anemones, and marine worms—which can take up the radiation more quickly than shelled creatures—though Whicker said fish may be most at risk.