Prisons: America’s slave empire


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© IBWC KC / YouTube

Three prisoners—Melvin Ray, James Pleasant and Robert Earl Council—who led work stoppages in Alabama prisons in January 2014 as part of the Free Alabama Movement have spent the last 18 months in solitary confinement. Authorities, unnerved by the protests that engulfed three prisons in the state, as well as by videos and pictures of abusive conditions smuggled out by the movement, say the men will remain in solitary confinement indefinitely.

The prison strike leaders are denied televisions and reading material. They spend at least three days a week, sometimes longer, without leaving their tiny isolation cells. They eat their meals seated on their steel toilets. They are allowed to shower only once every two days despite temperatures that routinely rise above 90 degrees.

The men have become symbols of a growing resistance movement inside American prisons. The prisoners’ work stoppages and refusal to co-operate with authorities in Alabama are modeled on actions that shook the Georgia prison system in December 2010. The strike leaders argue that this is the only mechanism left to the 2.3 million prisoners across America. By refusing to work—a tactic that would force prison authorities to hire compensated labor or to induce the prisoners to return to their jobs by paying a fair wage—the neoslavery that defines the prison system can be broken. Prisoners are currently organizing in Arizona, California, Florida, Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Mississippi, Texas, Virginia and Washington.

“We have to shut down the prisons,” Council, known as Kinetik, one of the founders of the Free Alabama Movement, told me by phone from the Holman Correctional Facility in Escambia County, Ala. He has been in prison for 21 years, serving a sentence of life without parole. “We will not work for free anymore. All the work in prisons, from cleaning to cutting grass to working in the kitchen, is done by inmate labor. [Almost no prisoner] in Alabama is paid. Without us the prisons, which are slave empires, cannot function. Prisons, at the same time, charge us a variety of fees, such as for our identification cards or wrist bracelets, and [impose] numerous fines, especially for possession of contraband. They charge us high phone and commissary prices. Prisons each year are taking larger and larger sums of money from the inmates and their families. The state gets from us millions of dollars in free labor and then imposes fees and fines. You have brothers that work in kitchens 12 to 15 hours a day and have done this for years and have never been paid.”

“We do not believe in the political process,” said Ray, who spoke from the St. Clair Correctional Facility in Springville, Ala., and who is serving life without parole. “We are not looking to politicians to submit reform bills. We aren’t giving more money to lawyers. We don’t believe in the courts. We will rely only on protests inside and outside of prisons and on targeting the corporations that exploit prison labor and finance the school-to-prison pipeline. We have focused our first boycott on McDonald’s. McDonald’s uses prisoners to process beef for patties and package bread, milk, chicken products. We have called for a national Stop Campaign against McDonald’s. We have identified this corporation to expose all the others. There are too many corporations exploiting prison labor to try and take them all on at once.”

“We are not going to call for protests outside of statehouses,” Ray went on. “Legislators are owned by corporations. To go up there with the achy breaky heart is not going to do any good. These politicians are in it for the money. If you are fighting mass incarceration, the people who are incarcerated are not in the statehouse. They are not in the parks. They are in the prisons. If you are going to fight for the people in prison, join them at the prison. The kryptonite to fight the prison system, which is a $500 billion enterprise, is the work strike. And we need people to come to the prisons to let guys on the inside know they have outside support to shut the prison down. Once we take our labor back, prisons will again become places for correction and rehabilitation rather than centers of corporate profit.”

The three prisoners said that until the prison-industrial complex was dismantled there would be no prison reform. They said books such as Stokely Carmichael’s “Ready for Revolution” and Michelle Alexander’s “The New Jim Crow,” along with the failure of prison reform movements, convinced them that the only hope to battle back against a prison system that contains 25 percent of the world’s prisoners was to organize resistance. And they find no solace in a black president.

“To say that we have a black president does not say anything,” Ray said. “The politicians are the ones who orchestrated this system. They are either directly involved as businessmen—many are already millionaires or billionaires, or they are controlled by millionaires and billionaires. We are not blindsided by titles. We are looking at what is going on behind the scenes. We see a coordinated effort by the Koch brothers, ALEC [the American Legislative Exchange Council] and political action committees that see in prisons a business opportunity. Their goal is to increase earnings. And once you look at it like this, it does not matter if we have a black or white president. That is why the policies have not changed. The laws, such as mandatory minimum [sentences], were put in place by big business so they would have access to cheap labor. The anti-terrorism laws were enacted to close the doors on the access to justice so people would be in prison longer. Big business finances campaigns. Big business writes the laws and legislation. And Obama takes money from these people. He is as vested in this system as they are.”

In Alabama prisons, as in nearly all such state facilities across the United States, prisoners do nearly every job, including cooking, cleaning, maintenance, laundry and staffing the prison barbershop. In the St. Clair prison there is also a chemical plant, a furniture company and a repair shop for state vehicles. Other Alabama prisons run printing companies and recycling plants, stamp license plates, make metal bed frames, operate sand pits and tend fish farms. Only a few hundred of Alabama’s 26,200 prisoners—the system is designed to hold only 13,130 people—are paid to work; they get 17 to 71 cents an hour. The rest are slaves.

The men bemoaned a lack of recreational and educational programs and basic hygiene supplies, the poor ventilation that sends temperatures in the cells and dormitories to over 100 degrees, crumbling infrastructures, infestations of cockroaches and rats, and corrupt prison guards who routinely beat prisoners and sell contraband, including drugs and cell phones. These conditions, coupled with the overcrowding, are, they warned, creating a tinderbox, especially as temperatures soar. There was a riot in St. Clair in April. There has been a rash of stabbings and fights in the prison. Prisoners have assaulted 10 guards in St. Clair during the last four weeks.

The worst thing is the water,” said James Pleasant, a St. Clair prisoner who has served 13 years of a 43-year sentence. “It is contaminated. It causes kidney, renal failure and cancer. The food causes stomach diseases. We have had three to four outbreaks of food poisoning in the last four months.”

He said that the prolonged caging of prisoners and the closing of rehabilitation programs, including education programs, guarantee recidivism, something sought by the corporations that profit from prisons. An estimated 80 percent of prisoners entering the Alabama prison system are functionally illiterate.

“Sleeping on a concrete slab is not going to teach you how to read or write,” Pleasant said. “Sleeping on a concrete slab will not solve mental health issues. But the system does not change. It does what it is designed to do. It makes sure people are driven back into the system to work without pay.”

“For years we were called niggers to indicate we had no value or worth and that anything could be done to us,” Ray said. “Then the word ‘nigger’ became politically incorrect. So they began calling us criminals. When you say a person is a criminal it means that what happens to them does not matter. It means he or she is a nigger. It means they deserve what they get.”

Prisons, the men said, have increasingly placed larger and larger financial burdens on families, with the poorest families suffering the most. Prisoners, too, suffer as a result.

“If you don’t get money from your family, your poverty blocks you out from buying items at the commissary or making phone calls,” Council said. “You can’t communicate with your family. If you don’t have someone to send you money you can’t even buy stamps to write home. They [authorities] are supposed to give us two free stamps a week, but I have never seen them do it in my 16 years of incarceration. We pay a $4 medical co-pay if we make a sick call. Every additional medication we receive is $4. If you have a cold and you get something for sinuses, pain meds and something for congestion, that becomes a $16 visit. And if you get $20 from a family member, the state will take $16 off the top to pay for the visit. You end up with $4 to spend at a jacked-up canteen. There are a lot of brothers walking around in debt. …”

“It takes brutality and force to make a person work for free and live in the type of conditions we live in and not do anything about it,” Ray said. “The only way they made slavery work was to use force. It is no different in the slave empire of prisons. They use brutality to hold it together. And this brutality will not go away until the system goes away.”

The men described numerous horrific beatings by guards.

Pleasant said, “They stood me up against the wall [with my hands cuffed behind me]. There were about 10 officers. They started swinging, punching and hitting me with sticks. They knocked my legs out from under me. My face hit the floor. They stomped on my face. They sent me to the infirmary to hide what they did, for 30 days. When I looked in the mirror I could not recognize my facial features. This was the fourth time I was beaten like this.”

I asked the three men, speaking to me on a conference call, what prison conditions said about America. They laughed.

“It says America is what it has always been, America,” said Ray. “It says if you are poor and black you will be exploited, brutalized and murdered. It says most of American society, especially white society, is indifferent. It says nothing has really changed for us since slavery.”

http://www.sott.net/article/298239-Prisons-Americas-slave-empire
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Revealed: Asian slave labour producing prawns for supermarkets in US, UK


Thai ‘ghost ships’ that enslave and even kill workers are linked to global shrimp supply chain, Guardian investigation discovers
• Trafficked into slavery on Thai trawlers to catch food for prawns
• Thailand’s seafood industry: state-sanctioned slavery?

Link to video: Globalised slavery: how big supermarkets are selling prawns in supply chain fed by slave labour

Slaves forced to work for no pay for years at a time under threat of extreme violence are being used in Asia in the production of seafood sold by major US, British and other European retailers, the Guardian can reveal.

A six-month investigation has established that large numbers of men bought and sold like animals and held against their will on fishing boats off Thailand are integral to the production of prawns (commonly called shrimp in the US) sold in leading supermarkets around the world, including the top four global retailers: Walmart, Carrefour, Costco and Tesco.

The investigation found that the world’s largest prawn farmer, the Thailand-based Charoen Pokphand (CP) Foods, buys fishmeal, which it feeds to its farmed prawns, from some suppliers that own, operate or buy from fishing boats manned with slaves.

Men who have managed to escape from boats supplying CP Foods and other companies like it told the Guardian of horrific conditions, including 20-hour shifts, regular beatings, torture and execution-style killings. Some were at sea for years; some were regularly offered methamphetamines to keep them going. Some had seen fellow slaves murdered in front of them.

Fifteen migrant workers from Burma and Cambodia also told how they had been enslaved. They said they had paid brokers to help them find work in Thailand in factories or on building sites. But they had been sold instead to boat captains, sometimes for as little as £250.

“I thought I was going to die,” said Vuthy, a former monk from Cambodia who was sold from captain to captain. “They kept me chained up, they didn’t care about me or give me any food … They sold us like animals, but we are not animals – we are human beings.”

Another trafficking victim said he had seen as many as 20 fellow slaves killed in front of him, one of whom was tied, limb by limb, to the bows of four boats and pulled apart at sea.

“We’d get beaten even if we worked hard,” said another. “All the Burmese, [even] on all the other boats, were trafficked. There were so many of us [slaves] it would be impossible to count them all.”

CP Foods – a company with an annual turnover of $33bn (£20bn) that brands itself as “the kitchen of the world” – sells its own-brand prawn feed to other farms, and supplies international supermarkets, as well as food manufacturers and food retailers, with frozen or cooked prawns and ready-made meals. It also sells raw prawn materials for food distributors.

In addition to Walmart, Carrefour, Costco and Tesco, the Guardian has identified Aldi, Morrisons, the Co-operative and Iceland as customers of CP Foods. They all sell frozen or cooked prawns, or ready meals such as prawn stir fry, supplied by CP Foods and its subsidiaries. CP Foods admits that slave labour is part of its supply chain.

“We’re not here to defend what is going on,” said Bob Miller, CP Foods’ UK managing director. “We know there’s issues with regard to the [raw] material that comes in [to port], but to what extent that is, we just don’t have visibility.”

The supply chain works in this way: Slave ships plying international waters off Thailand scoop up huge quantities of “trash fish”, infant or inedible fish. The Guardian traced this fish on landing to factories where it is ground down into fishmeal for onward sale to CP Foods. The company uses this fishmeal to feed its farmed prawns, which it then ships to international customers.

The alarm over slavery in the Thai fishing industry has been sounded before by non-governmental organisations and in UN reports.

But now, for the first time, the Guardian has established how the pieces of the long, complex supply chains connect slavery to leading producers and retailers.

“If you buy prawns or shrimp from Thailand, you will be buying the produce of slave labour,” said Aidan McQuade, director of Anti-Slavery International.

The Guardian conducted dozens of interviews with fishermen, boat captains, boat managers, factory owners and Thai officials in and around various ports in Thailand.Thailand enjoys a prime position as the world’s largest prawn exporter in a vast seafood-export industry estimated to be worth some $7.3bn. Through multinationals such as CP Foods, Thailand ships out roughly 500,000 tonnes of prawns every year – nearly 10% of which is farmed by CP Foods alone.

Although slavery is illegal in every country in the world, including Thailand, some 21 million men, women and children are enslaved globally, according to the International Labour Organisation. These people may have been sold like property, forced to work under mental or physical threat, or find themselves controlled by their “employers”. Thailand is considered a major source, transit and destination country for slavery, and nearly half a million people are believed to be currently enslaved within Thailand’s borders. There is no official record of how many men are enslaved on fishing boats. But the Thai government estimates that up to 300,000 people work in its fishing industry, 90% of whom are migrants vulnerable to being duped, trafficked and sold to the sea. Rights groups have long pointed to Thailand’s massive labour shortage in its fishing sector, which – along with an increased demand from the US and Europe for cheap prawns – has driven the need for cheap labour.

“We’d like to solve the problem of Thailand because there’s no doubt commercial interests have created much of this problem,” admits CP Foods’ Miller.The Guardian’s findings come at a crucial moment. After being warned for four consecutive years that it was not doing enough to tackle slavery, Thailand risks being given the lowest ranking on the US state department’s human trafficking index, which grades 188 nations according to how well they combat and prevent human trafficking.

Relegation to tier 3 would put Thailand, which is grappling with the aftermath of a coup, on a par with North Korea and Iran, and could result in a downgrade of Thailand’s trading status with the US.

“Thailand is committed to combatting human trafficking,” said the Thai ambassador to the US, Vijavat Isarabhakdi. “We know a lot more needs to be done but we also have made very significant progress to address the problem.”

Although the Thai government has told the Guardian that “combating human trafficking is a national priority”, our undercover investigation unearthed a lawless and unregulated industry run by criminals and the Thai mafia – facilitated by Thai officials and sustained by the brokers who supply cheap migrant labour to boat owners.

“The Thai authorities could get rid of the brokers and arrange [legal] employment,” one high-ranking Thai official, who is tasked with investigating human trafficking cases, said on condition of anonymity. “But the government doesn’t want to do that, it doesn’t want to take action. As long as [boat] owners still depend on brokers – and not the government – to supply workers, then the problem will never go away.”

Human rights activists believe that Thailand’s seafood-export industry would probably collapse without slavery. They say, there is little incentive for the Thai government to act and have called for consumers and international retailers to demand action.

“Global brands and retailers can do so much good without bringing too much risk upon themselves by simply enforcing their supplier standards, which typically prohibit forced labour and child labour,” said Lisa Rende Taylor of Anti-Slavery International. “And if local businesses realise that non-compliance results in loss of business, it has the potential to bring about huge positive change in the lives of migrant workers and trafficking victims.”The Guardian asked the supermarkets to comment on our finding of slavery in their supply chains.

All said they condemned slavery and human trafficking for labour. They all also pointed to systems of auditing they have in place to check labour conditions. Several retailers have joined a new initiative called Project Issara (Project Freedom) to discuss how they should respond and several attended a meeting in with the major producers in Bangkok at the end of last month at which slavery was discussed.

Walmart, the world’s largest retailer, said: “We are actively engaged in this issue and playing an important role in bringing together stakeholders to help eradicate human trafficking from Thailand’s seafood export sector.”

Carrefour said it conducts social audits of all suppliers, including the CP factory that supplies it with some prawns. It tightened up the process after alerts in 2012. It admitted that it did not check right to the end of its complex chains.

Costco told us it would require its suppliers of Thai prawn “to take corrective action to police their feedstock sources”.

A Tesco spokesperson said: “We regard slavery as completely unacceptable. We are working with CP Foods to ensure the supply chain is slavery-free, and are also working in partnership with the International Labour Organisation [ILO] and Ethical Trading Initiative to achieve broader change across the Thai fishing industry.”

Morrisons said it would take the matter up with CP urgently. “We are concerned by the findings of the investigation. Our ethical trading policy forbids the use of forced labour by suppliers and their suppliers.”

The Co-operative was among those saying it was already working to understand “working conditions beyond the processing level”. “The serious issue of human trafficking on fishing boats is challenging to address and requires a partnership” in which it is actively engaged.

The managing director of corporate buying at Aldi UK, Tony Baines, said: “Our supplier standards, which form part of Aldi’s contractual terms and conditions, stipulate that our suppliers must comply with applicable national laws, industry minimum standards and ILO and United Nations conventions of human rights, whichever standard is more stringent.

“These standards also require that suppliers do not engage in any form of forced labour and related practices. Aldi will not tolerate workplace practices and conditions which violate basic human rights.”

Iceland said it only sourced one line containing prawns from a CP subsidiary but it was pleased to note that CP was “at the forefront of efforts to raise standards in the Thai fishing industry”.

CP said in a statement that it believed the right thing was to use its commercial weight to try to influence the Thai government to act rather than walk away from the Thai fishing industry, although it is putting in place plans to use alternative proteins in its feed so that it can eliminate Thai fishmeal by 2021 if necessary. It said it had already tightened controls over the way its fishmeal is procured. While it recognises that workers on boats are exploited, it added that the Thai department of fisheries continues to deny that unregistered boats are a problem. “We can do nothing, and witness these social and environmental issues destroy the seas around Thailand, or we can help drive improvement plans. We are making good progress,” it said.

• This article was amended on 11 June 2014 as an earlier version said Thailand ships out roughly 50,000 tonnes of prawns every year. This has been corrected to say 500,000 tonnes.

SIGN PETITION to Costco, Walmart, and Carrefour to “Join Project Issara, a Thai based initiative to end modern slavery, and institute a zero tolerance policy on slavery.”

http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2014/jun/10/supermarket-prawns-thailand-produced-slave-labour

Hidden Meanings Built into the English Language


It’s no wonder they stopped making Latin a mandatory language in schools long ago, when we’ve given our tacit consent to indentured servitude simply by our own use of the English language.

The Slavery System


cease-and-desist-silver

Whether we realized it or not, until recently, we were all ‘legally’ debt or ‘labor’ slaves, as were our parents, our grandparents and great grandparents before us.

 

 

 

 

 

Since 1933 every new child born was required to be ‘registered’, thereby creating a Corporate Person, effectively denying that child any rights as an owner of Real Property.

 

The act of registering a child contracted them as chattel, and the birth record was a deceptive legal way of getting the parents to sign the baby away. The birth record was in fact a promissory note that was converted into a slave bond, which was then sold to a private reserve bank effectively giving ownership of the child to the bank.

 

Each new baby’s contract was sealed by either a drop of their blood or by an ink impression of their foot onto the birth record. This ‘signature’ was used to create their lifetime value, evidenced by their labor and the taxes and costs of that labor as monetized currency – all designed to keep people in servitude for their entire lifetime.

 

The banks have been the modern slave owners and as the saying goes, “He who owns the debt owns the people.” The way the Slavery System was imposed on us meant that even if we did end up paying off our house or our car, we never actually owned it, because our right to any Real Property ownership was given away at the registration of our birth.

 

This has been legal process since 1540 via something called a Cestui Que (Vie) Trust, and this was still in effect until the recent UCC Rulings changed the legal landscape and reinstated the un-rebuttable fact that no-one can own our ‘selves or own our bodies.

 

The slavery system remained intact for so long because of educational doctrines, the influence of our community at large and because so many people accepted and embraced their slavery by waiting for others to help them or to tell them what they should/could or should/could not do. Enforcers like the police and courts made sure we stayed within the slavery system and incarcerated us if we chose to live as FREE individuals.

 

In fact, the slavery system was imposed on us all (and maintained for centuries) by building walls in our minds through propaganda and conditioning, creating the false belief that we did not deserve better, that we were not part of a greater plan and that we should instead be happy with the handouts, crumbs and ‘indulgences’ given to us by the Powers That Were (PTW), while the system itself reaped in millions of dollars every year, directly from the sweat and blood of our labor.

 

But no more. Now you are FREE.

 

AND SO IT IS .

 

 

 

Force of Light


This weekend brings with it great expectations.  It is the last weekend in May and lots of folks we are listening to have mentioned this as a pivotal time.  This is a story we’ve all heard before.  It’s one we might be better off to ignore.  The idea of something to wait for is very much the thought of a slave.  Slaves wait to be told what to do and when and what they’ll receive for their actions.  Masters DO, confident in the outcome.
You are surrounded by Masters; many of them convinced of their slavery.  Since you are reading this, you remain skeptical.  Good.
Right now, many Masters are engaged in freedom work.  It is happening on the ground, in real time.  It is happening in what we’ve come to call our dream time.  You may be feeling tired, anxious, angry or agitated – without visible cause.  This is most likely a remnant of your/our off planet engagement.  Trust that all is well.  You are right where you are supposed to be.  As a Master, you have stopped waiting.  If this decision hasn’t yet caught up to your daily life, it is time that it does.  You are here to DO.
Right now, there are legions of fierce ones assuring you succeed.  You can proceed, knowing that your plans will be made manifest.  With each effort, the idea of freedom expands.  Those that stand at the ready to ensure your safety are the “Philosopher~Warrior~Angels” that were mentioned the other day.  They are here to guarantee your success.  Trust and DO.  Now is the time.
What are you contemplating?  Do it.  Fear is a fruitless enterprise.  Love is powerful.  It is fierce.  It is synonymous with freedom. The statement “freedom isn’t free” applies here.  There is work to be done.  By us.
You could write a letter, march, join, start, talk.  Whatever you choose, do so with confidence.  Your freedom has been guaranteed by forces you can barely imagine. The battle rages on, yet we’ve won.  What is going on now is a relentless push by those who have yet to “get the memo”.
Those who will assure that freedom prevails are fiercely, constantly engaged.  They will not stand down, give up or change focus.  It is time to honor them with equal efforts. You know your work.  It is the thing running deeply through you always.  It keeps you up at night and restless in your days, jobs and relationships.  Unsure of when the time would arise to do it, you’ve held back, as if on “pause”.
The time has arrived.  The stage is set for a spectacular new vision.  It’s based on agape as fuel for creation, new life and what comes next.  As a Master, you’re not content with answers from elsewhere.  All answers come from within and are given as a result of your DOing.
It may not look exactly as you envisioned.  That is because there are 7 billion of us, building it together.  It’ll be better than we’ve imagined or seen before.  It’ll open the door for yet more.  It won’t get rid of everything; some people, programs and structures will remain.  Yet they will now serve the whole and benefit the many.
In our yard we’ve had two nests on different downspouts of our gutters.  Four families have used these two homes – the second two building on what was built by the first, all this season; different species of birds.  The first two built on what had been left from last year.  Nothing was wasted.  New life emerges with each generation – all from the same place.
You have come to build on what is here, toss or alter what doesn’t work and keep at it until it fits.  Trust that you know. Your success is guaranteed.  Yesterday something shifted in the direction you’ve been headed.  On some level, you felt it change, and your heart lifted. Allow your heart to guide you now; this is what you came for. The rest of us are watching.  Show us who you are.  You are the One.

 

The Language of Slavery


 

 

In these days of endless waiting, it occurs to me that even a bank account filled beyond comprehension will not alter the mindset of slavery.  A lifetime of ownership has left deeply rooted beliefs and habits of speech.  Some of these will be easy to let go of, while others are almost invisible.

 

 

 

A slave is one who is owned.  Their rights and permissible actions are determined outside of themselves; in fact, they ignore inner knowing in favor of outside validation for truth.  They do this out of fear.  Regardless of their feelings in any moment, they are obedient to their owners.

 

 

In order for this experiment of control and manipulation to end, we have to stop acting, thinking and speaking as slaves.  There are words we use every day that give evidence to our state of mind:

 

 

Worship, subservient, allow, bow down, authority, top-down, class (ruling, upper, middle, lower), caste system, owner, ruler, king, hierarchy, monarchy, belong, rule, dictator, deserve, grant, pray, wealth, permission, job, owe, debt, disobey, illegal, order, must appear, jail, obey, freedom, ticket, enforce, allow, forbid, deny, educate, permit, paycheck, borrow, tax, punish, need, afraid, lose, weekend, work week, income, employment, unemployment, bum, homeless, blue collar, white collar, wage, salary, earn, own.

 

 

There are others, this is not an exhaustive list.  We are in a gradual process of emancipation and they will occur to us as we proceed.  We’ll discover them as we feel our way to sovereignty.  These are words that imply someone or something enjoys a level of control over another, over us.  Freedom cannot be granted; free is what you are.

 

 

For these changes are unprecedented and cannot be taught.  It is with full consciousness that we’ll notice the twangs of ownership rear up in conversation.  It could be with a friend, a bank, a boss, a spouse, a lover or a child. The habits of servitude and guilt around breaking the “rules” will not disappear on their own.  We will forcibly end both, with persistence and compassion.

 

 

Love is not acting in a way that makes someone happy – love is.  How we act has no bearing on its existence.  When love is recognized, clarity of purpose emerges.

 

 

It is time to evict the words that hold our thoughts bondage to slave systems and ways of being.  Pay attention to habits of ownership.  Refuse debt of any kind.  There is physical as well as mental and emotional debt.  You stand free and unencumbered.  Act as if you are.

 

 

There is no one to wait for, obey, pay, owe or depend on.  It’s all you.  Level the playing field, everyone is equal.  We have been envisioning freedom and cheering each other on as bonds are broken and success in “bucking the corruption” is realized.  We are anxious for some cold, hard, spendable cash. After decades of slavery, this makes sense.  But then what?

 

 

Say you wake up Monday with access to billions and everyone knows it.  What happens Tuesday?  This is our next effort.  We’ll get there together.

 

 

What are you waiting for?  You are the One.

 

 

 

New Websites: Absolute Data Exchange & Free Speech Australia


 

 

 

 

 

New Websites: Absolute Data Exchange & Free Speech Australia
May 6, 2013

Here is the direct link to the site:
http://www.absolute-data-exchange.com/

About

The Absolute-Data-Exchange is a site where you can source documentation, contact addresses, and guidance, to help you make a clear statement to the Powers-that-Were, telling them that their day is over, and we – the people – are taking back our freedom, our value, and our sanity.

Our CRM is a highly advanced database driven portal giving you the opportunity to select OPPT documentation and send it directly to organisations (including alleged government departments and institutions) helping to educate the good people who are still working for the old system.

We are BEings, and we are all eternal essence, so it is up to us to “play-nice” and educate our brothers and sisters who have not yet been informed about the new legal and social landscape. By sending courtesy notices and information about the UCC (Uniform Commercial Code) filings you can make a real and tangible difference, paving the way to a new world, with new rules, new opportunities, and a brighter future.

Join together, our strength is in numbers, and only the creator (whatever you believe that to be) has any rights over us.

With honour, love, and unity.

The Absolute-Data-Exchange Crew

 

 

 

 

Are you upholding a slavery system?

The most ludicrous thing is that each banker, lawyer or judicial officer who supports this, is still caught INSIDE as a slave, just like the unsuspecting victims – us, the Public! The only difference is that you make money from pushing slavery as well as pay for it.

Let’s face it, when was the last time you met a HAPPY lawyer, banker or judge???

Australian Banks across the board operate under practices that damage lives and undermine the very fabric of society.

Starting with Misleading Conduct, Creation of Debt Servitude, False Advertising and much more through the engagement of unlawful courts, criminal laywers and gutless debt collectors. All just to swindle that next “Promissory Note” for new money creation. Learn here how it is done.

1 – LOAN or SLAVERY? – you decide

Ex Finance Broker stops paying his mortgage, and challenges lender to prove their claim – LIVE!

RHG Homeloans (former RAMS) an Australian “lender” is publicly invited to provide substantiation about their claim for monthly repayments by a Perth family who stopped paying their “mortgage” and put their house on the line after finding out what was going on behind the scenes and receiving NO answers from their bank. An in-depth private mortgage audit revealed incredible information and all relevant questions presented remain unanswered to date.

 

ALL Bank Loans based on Fraud? Ex-Finance Broker seeks substantiation of own purported mortgage “debt” – LIVE & transparent


From http://freespeechaustralia.org/

Are You Upholding a Slavery System?

The most ludicrous thing is that each banker, lawyer or judicial officer who supports this, is still caught INSIDE as a slave, just like the unsuspecting victims – us, the Public! The only difference is that you make money from pushing slavery as well as pay for it.

Let’s face it, when was the last time you met a HAPPY lawyer, banker or judge???

Australian Banks across the board operate under practices that damage lives and undermine the very fabric of society.
Starting with Misleading Conduct, Creation of Debt Servitude, False Advertising and much more through the engagement of unlawful courts, criminal laywers and gutless debt collectors. All just to swindle that next “Promissory Note” for new money creation. Learn here how it is done.

Substantiate the Debt and we will continue to pay you.

If you are unable to do so by providing all requested evidence, duly verified in the eyes of THE WORLD, where do you think you will go with this?

Continue with your harrasment, bullying, outright lies and constructs, or shall we say – Domestic Terrorism?

Extortion remains extortion. The time for change is NOW!

THE TRUTH WILL SET US ALL FREE

SEE VIDEO PRESENTATIONS

 

Your Absolute Value – “Spend Like a Boss”




This is a place of knowing.  You have come from a place of wishing it was true, to a place of hoping it could be true, to knowing it is true.  You are the value.  The value is not held in the 5, 6 or 10 billion.  The value is you.
The whole notion of cash was a set-up.  A brilliant device used to enslave and de-value you.  It is no wonder the beings who devised this plan were referred to as “gods”.  With the creation of ownership, the game was on.  It is an old game, as evidenced by discoveries of hoards of ancient priceless artifacts along with stories of servants and royalty.
These stories are your history.  Deeply embedded in your collective subconscious is the notion of top-down, master-servant, and owner-slave.  This is intentional.  This gradual awareness of your enslavement has been your awakening.  As you step back far enough, you see that pockets of revolution have always occurred.  You write books and films about these revolts and their hero’s, always identifying with them at some level.  You praise their courage and are fully in their camp throughout.  This is because You are One.
Slaves, servants, the lower rung, the working class are different brandings of just one thing – a being who believes himself owned.  It may be a king or a mortgage, it matters not.  If you believe your very life is dependent on you ability to work for something or someone (which is debt of any kind), you have a master.
We have come now to understanding the corrupt banking practices that run the world.  This is gradually morphing into a realization of our worth.  We are the only value that has ever been.  Nothing happens without our signature.  It is our identity that begins the process and it is initiated at birth.  We are catalogued, counted and our value is used as commodity.  It is our absolute value that those who understand the game are after.
 We are stepping into a place of knowing.  The fact that the game is rigged does not alter the players.  We agreed to the game, used it to catapult our awareness and we’ve arrived at the moment of our realization.  We are the value.
If my signature is necessary for a lousy $300,000.00 mortgage or $5,000.00 credit card – then the worth of my Being is beyond comprehension.  Numbers have been tossed out – 5 Billion, 10 Billion.  Yet truly I say to you – Can you put a numerical value on life?
Yes, right now money is deemed necessary and yes, until we end the game it will be (necessary) and yes, there is a system being launched, that will assure you get yours – but I ask you again, what number would you use to categorize the value of you?
You are unlimited – an eternal BEing of light with Angelic DNA.  You’ve volunteered to participate in a great forgetting so that you would one day come to an incredible process of remembering.  You have been of service to the whole of creation.  It is time now to accept your worth.
This is not the same as pretending, dreaming or wishing, for in each rests a state of disbelief.  This is a knowing.
One of our sons wanted a two wheeler.  So we got him one.  It sat for days, maybe weeks, in the garage, un-ridden.  There was some discussion, not much, about the idea that he’d figure it out just as soon as he got on that bike.  Time passed.  One day, without discussion, he marched down the stairs, out the door, to his bike and rode down the street.  That was the day he stopped wishing he could ride a two wheeler.  That day he knew he was a bike rider.
Money has nothing to do with value.  You are the value – money is a game piece.
What Heather, Caleb and Randall did last year was figure out the game, call their bluff and lay the cards on the table for all of us to see.  It was a brilliant move.  With honor and gratitude I acknowledge their magnificence and accept responsibility for my own.
Slaves wait to be told what to do.  Masters decide what is necessary and take care of it.  You are a Master.  Take your life, your Absolute Value, into consideration in every moment.  It is worth no less or more than the life of any other. We are One.
I have said you are Gods.  There is nothing beyond your reach.  Within you is the stuff of miracles.  Your imagination is your greatest tool, followed by belief, knowing and DOing.  This is your game – what piece have you chosen and what will you do with it?  Your value is beyond comprehension.  It is time to spend it.
A brave, bold, beautiful and powerful angel has said “It’s time to spend like a boss”.  Yes Seraph, it is.  Let no one who engages you misunderstand your value.  BE the value every moment.  Say “I AM”  “I AM the Lord thy god.  Thou shalt have no other Gods before me.” 
The words are true.  They have been misrepresented, that’s all.  Our God does not demand subservience.  Our God is the One.  It is the collective that has played the game; now its time to collect and “spend like a boss”.
The Absolute Value does not rest in a number, it is found in each Embodiment of Eternal Essence. It is found in you.  You know who you are.  What are you waiting for?  You are the One.

http://briankellysblog.blogspot.com/

 

God Whisperer ~ GOD IS ONE OF US. GOD IS ALL OF US!



‘I hesitate to share this, as I do not normally speak like this. Yet, it is me and I have been sharing my understanding out loud right along. I have accessed my eternal essence and speak here as God. This is not channeled. It was whispered. I share it here because this is a journey we are taking together, as One. The language is uncomfortable yet it was and is mine. I have been transparent with you all along and this discomfort will not stop the transparency.

~ GOD IS ONE OF US. GOD IS ALL OF US. ~

You are resting in a field of “when”. Even now, when the legal instrument for your freedom has been supplied – you wait to be handed your freedom. You wait for your captors to give up and give you back what they took. Still you think like a slave. The training is embedded deep within this race; it will take a fight to get it removed.

You are my children and I watch you kneel and bow and grovel and obey a set of beings who have set themselves against the purpose of creation. Creation thrives on balance. Yin Yang, Positive Negative, Hot Cold and yet these “masters” have altered the fabric. It was an experiment and its time for completion is long since passed.

The final word was and always is mine. It was to be different – I am pleased with what my creations have accomplished and yet still the raping and theft of the planet continues at the hands of those who would call themselves Gods. They are powerful beings; equal to God in every way but one. The Source of this Universe does not spring from them. They have taken truth – the truth of their power, and isolated it. They forgot who they were and pushed so far past what is true as to forget.

They do not want Oneness and will not be convinced of its benefits. The benefits they seek are here in the material world. Life means little to them, except their own. They will not alter their course except by force. It is humans as One force who could stop them, yet it is not seen that the desire is there.

An era of love has overtaken the planet. A very good thing but with these beings it is not love that will stop them in their current form. It is force. It will take a melding of all the voices, not just the Light, to stop them. It will take a refusal to be slaves. It will take an acceptance of the truth of them.

Power does not come without knowledge. Acceptance does not mean a lack of action. Understand the difference between polite and subservient. You will have an effect now only in full acknowledgement of your power.

You are able to change the course of history, the plan for the planet if you do so as One. There is One voice that is heard by me and it is spoken by Humanity. This is the voice of Man. This voice unites now on being sick of the corruption and tired. This voice has not yet said “No”. A “No” will be heard when the truth of your slavery sinks in.

I understand that not everyone has the temperament, purpose or desire to fight – yet without the internal resolve to ignore and dissolve the Masters – there will be slaves.

You were created to express life and have not displeased me. You were also scheduled at this moment to answer a question – “How much will it take to push you into action?” “How deeply do you sleep?” “What is the threshold of your Absolute Awareness?” For the time of partial knowing is over.

The transformation is upon you and it will happen voluntarily or drag you along with it.

You cannot be partially free. You cannot be a little in love. You are free. You are love.

There is a term coined “tough love”. This implies doing unpopular things because of love.

And what is love? It is an acknowledgement of other in self – a seeing of self in other – and saying “Yes, I see you, I accept you, and all is well.” Acceptance does not mean alter. Acceptance means honesty. It does not hide from what is obvious.

You have a pink elephant in your house. It is a member of the house and is defecating everywhere; it stinks. It has to go someplace else. Your talk of loving the elephant falls far short of stopping the shit from destroying your home. It has to go; love has nothing to do with it.

Love does not mean inaction. It does not mean allowance as in submission. Love means a direct understanding of the truth in all beings – an acknowledgement of the sacred in life. It means responsibility. Love demands an examination of all thought, word and deed. You cannot partially serve Truth. Truth demands Absolute Awareness.

Once I understand that I am not higher evolved or lesser than – I am called to act as if. Act as if there is One Truth. You do not know if your way of being is the desired way for all beings. Yet you must always maintain the absolute right of all beings to maintain their own way of being – UNLESS IT INFRINGES OR DOES HARM TO LIFE.

Life expressed physically is You – it is all things – it cannot be separated – it is One.

The life that is You is being harmed and this cannot continue. Life demands to be allowed to continue. As a tree must lose some sickly branches in order to thrive – humanity must lose the poisoned ones so that it can thrive. You are again at a moment of decision that you can take into your own hands and make or allow me to make for you – I will make it with destruction as in the case of the planet that is the only way for life to continue.

Slaves can have many Masters – not all are physical; some are ideas, thoughts that limit and beliefs that keep us in line. It is upon you now to examine every emotion that unsettles – seek its origin and decide if at its root it is slavery or freedom that disturbs you.

For freedom is a disturbing place to be as well – a place that incites passion and action and an ever reaching grasp for more.

At your core you are designed always to reach – “More” is the fuel of creation.

When you are confused about the source of your inner disturbance ask this – “Am I disturbed because of a giving up?” “Am I disturbed because of a letting go?” “Am I disturbed because of fear?” “What is the source of this fear?” If the source is other – then it is a case of slavery. If the source is self – more inquiries are called upon to determine its cause. Are you afraid to lose your life? Your “face”? Your pride? Are you afraid others will think you are foolish or reckless? At what are you looking? At who?

I tell you this – you cannot lose life – it is eternal. Yet the physical must be cared for and nurtured. No “other” exists that can destroy you. Do you understand? The “face” you are putting out for others to see is a reflection of your very truth. It is your chosen form. Growth and understanding can’t help but change your face – that’s what awareness does.

The innocence of a child is something you all cherish because the pain has been so great in your loss of it – yet innocence is confused with joy and they are not the same.

There is none happier than a wise and ancient soul who sees and understands the expression of life – there is a luscious, rich, tender and beautiful joy in every terrible, wonderful moment. You are not here to be nice or to make each other happy. You are here to live and in your living of life unencumbered by the chains of limitation you will bring joy to all you meet.

I am you.

What are you waiting for? You are the One.’

~Sophia

I realize the picture is rather crude, but I’m tired of the shenanigans. They are the elephant and they must now go!

http://americankabuki.blogspot.com/2013/04/god-whisperer.html

 

Understanding the OPPT ~ The Slave System


In the introduction, the term “slavery system” was used. Some people know how that term applies to the current reality, at least before OPPT. For others, the term slavery system might seem too strong. As mentioned earlier, we have been living in this old paradigm world all our lives, and we have been led to believe that this is just the way it is – normal. If you are in the former group, and can say, “Yup, I understand why you are calling it a slavery system,” feel free to skip this entire section, or you can follow up with any or all references provided at the end of this section.

If you are in the second group, and your “skeptical meter” has moved up into the yellow or red with the term slavery system, then you are encouraged to keep reading, because it is important that you come to understand and believe the term is appropriate. Of course everything is relative, and relative to the way the Negro was treated several centuries ago, our current slavery is mild. That being said, I believe that after reading this, you will agree that We the People have been enslaved to a greater degree than we believed.

 

Early history of the United States:

In the late 1700s, the British colonists living in the original 13 colonies of North America, were fed up with British control. People began to recognize that they had value, and they wanted to share that value with others. They saw their liberty as their property, and to protect their liberty they had to ensure that all others had the same right to that liberty. They viewed this as a “God given Trust.” The people rose up and separated themselves from England. To do so they created and declared a set of principles to the entire world to ensure that America would never be enslaved. These principles are clearly outlined in the Declaration of Independence of 1776, which declared them to be One Free Equal People, with “un-a-lien-able rights,” meaning that no one can put a lien on those rights. The Declaration of Independence was written, along with the Constitution For the United States (note the word for not of). Several significant principles were established at that time for this country: “…. that all men are created equal; …they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights….. life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” It was further stated that the government derives its power form the people, and the people have the right and responsibility to alter or abolish the government if it does not serve the people. The United States was originally set up as a republic with a government that was designed to serve We the People.

When we get to explaining the OPPT, you will see that the principles of the documents that the OPPT wrote are the same as the principles that the founding fathers of the United States saw as important. Simply, we are sovereign beings, with rights endowed by the Creator.

 

So, what happened; how did we get where we are today?

The above two paragraphs relate only to the United States. All other countries of the world have a much different early history, but recent happenings are common for all countries.

We’ll start by identifying the “Controllers.” There are many other names for the controllers: cabal, illuminate, power elite, new world order, secret government, powers that be, etc. You are probably familiar with some of these terms already; they all refer to the same people mostly. They are motivated by money and power, and their agenda is world domination and control. Those at the top are small in numbers, but their tentacles reach deep into all aspects of society. Another term that has been used lately is “bankster”, because the banking industry is the “head of the beast.”

“I believe that banking institutions are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies.” – Thomas Jefferson

“Give me control of a nation’s money, and I care not who makes it’s laws” – Mayer Amschel Bauer Rothchild (a powerful controller of the banking cartel)

“It is well enough that the people of the nation do not understand our banking and monetary system, for if they did, I believe there would be a revolution before tomorrow morning.” – Henry Ford

Long ago the controllers learned the power of fraudulent, but difficult to detect, banking practices to increase their power and wealth. Today, they “own,” literally in most cases: All the world central banks, all the large national banks, all the major news media (controlling the information also gives great power), all branches of government, energy industry, healthcare industry, education, and religious institutions. Until very recently, they were well on their way to achieving complete world domination – their New World Order. Now this is not to say that all people working for any of those organizations are corrupt. Many are good honest people doing their jobs without knowing that they too are being controlled. The real power brokers are mostly only at the top.

Author’s note: Now, if this is getting depressing, stay tuned, because “the good news” is yet to come in that I will explain later why the controller’s reign is over.

One of the things that was done to all countries of the world, was to turn the governments into corporations. In 1871, Washington D.C. became THE COPRORATION OF THE UNITED STATES, chartered in London, and a new constitution was written: THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES, in all capital letters. Remember from above, that the original constitution was the Constitution For the United States. A corporation is not designed to serve any people except its shareholders, and it is designed for commerce, not service; hence a significant aspect of all of our problems. If this is new to you, there is a plethora of information from many sources on the internet to back up all that is said here, and references are provided at the end of this section. That being said, there is also much disinformation put out by the controllers, because they really do not want We the People to learn their dirty secrets.

In the Introduction section of this writing, the term “old paradigm slave system” was used. It is now time to give some examples in to demonstrate why that is an appropriate term. The biggest enslavement tool used by the controllers is debt. They have created a debt based financial system where they reap the profits, we pay the debt; but the truth is that it is all a fraudulent ruse. Space here doesn’t permit a full explanation of how it all works, and few people really understand the details, but I am confident that all would agree that debt is a big problem for most people. We are slaves to debt, but it goes deeper than that.

When we were born, a birth certificate was written and issued. That birth certificate is actually a document of the corporation that made us all chattel of the corporation. We are literally “owned” by the corporation. Of course the controllers are smart enough to understand that if people really knew the truth, they would rebel in a heartbeat. They also know that they have to give the people a certain measure of freedom, and promote the premise that we are free. They can do that easily through their controlled corporate media, and their control of the education system. In reality, we have never known real freedom because our only frame of reference has been the “slave system.”

The good news:

With the current raising of consciousness, more and more people are awakening to what is really going on. We are seeing evidence of that all over the world. No, it is still not apparent through the mainstream media for obvious reasons, and one has to use trusted, alternative, internet media to find it, but it is there. There is also a tremendous pushback by many groups, and although progress is slower than many would like, progress is being made in removing the controllers from power. There have been literally hundreds of recent resignation within the upper echelons of the banking cartel, behind the scenes arrests, the recent resignation of the Pope, etc, etc. The latest term for the controllers is “The Powers That Were!!”

In the next section we will get to the “meat”, and learn how the One People’s Public Trust has become the real “game changer” in our transition from the old paradigm world to he New Paradigm world.

I invite you to keep reading.

References for more information:

– Google and research the term “strawman”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8y06NSBBRtY ( link to a part of President Eisenhower’s farewell address where he warned about the dangers of the military industrial complex)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lVsMUpPgdT0 (link to short video on CORPORATION OF THE UNITED STATES)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QPKKQnijnsM&feature=player_embedded (link to short video on distribution of wealth in the U.S.)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ER68ywwAmz4 (link to short video: “25 goals of Illuminate” )

http://understandingtheoppt.info/slavesystem.shtml

 

Max Igan ~ Good and Evil, Freedom and Slavery, Love and Fear


Published on Mar 9, 2013

AOD ScaReCRoWAOD ScaReCRoW

Link to Playlist

Max Igan – Surviving the Matrix – March 8th, 2013

http://thecrowhouse.com
IP: http://67.20.81.143

Universal Law trumps all others.

1. No man or woman, in or out of government shall initiate force, threat of force or fraud against my life and property and, any and all contracts I am a party to, not giving full disclosure to me, whether signed by me or not, are void at my discretion.

2. I may use force in self-defense against anyone that violates Law 1.

3. There shall be no exceptions to Law 1 and 2.

“When the tyrant has disposed of foreign enemies by conquest or treaty and there is nothing to fear from them, then he is always stirring up some war or other, in order that the people may require a leader” – Plato

The South’s Shocking Hidden History: Thousands of Blacks Forced Into Slavery Until WW2


The Washington Monthly / By Douglas A. Blackmon [1]
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January 15, 2013  |

On July 31, 1903, a letter addressed to President Theodore Roosevelt arrived at the White House. It had been mailed from the town of Bainbridge, Georgia, the prosperous seat of a cotton county perched on the Florida state line.

The sender was a barely literate African American woman named Carrie Kinsey. With little punctuation and few capital letters, she penned the bare facts of the abduction of her fourteen-year-old brother, James Robinson, who a year earlier had been sold into involuntary servitude.

Kinsey had already asked for help from the powerful white people in her world. She knew where her brother had been taken—a vast plantation not far away called Kinderlou. There, hundreds of black men and boys were held in chains and forced to labor in the fields or in one of several factories owned by the McRee family, one of the wealthiest and most powerful in Georgia. No white official in this corner of the state would take an interest in the abduction and enslavement of a black teenager.

Confronted with a world of indifferent white people, Mrs. Kinsey did the only remaining thing she could think of. Newspapers across the country had recently reported on a speech by Roosevelt promising a “square deal” for black Americans. Mrs. Kinsey decided that her only remaining hope was to beg the president of the United States to help her brother.

“Mr. Prassident,” she wrote. “They wont let me have him.… He hase not don nothing for them to have him in chanes so I rite to you for your help.”

Considered more than a century later, her letter courses with desperation and submerged outrage. Yet when received at the White House, it was slipped into a small rectangular folder and forwarded to the Department of Justice. There, it was tagged with a reference number, 12007, and filed away. Teddy Roosevelt never saw it. No action was taken. Her words lie still at the National Archives just outside Washington, D.C.

As dumbfounding as the story told by the Carrie Kinsey letter is, far more remarkable is what surrounds that letter at the National Archives. In the same box that holds her grief-stricken missive are at least half a dozen other pieces of correspondence recounting other stories of kidnapping, perversion of the courts, or human trafficking—as horrifying as, or worse than, Carrie Kinsey’s tale. It is the same in the next box on the shelf. And the one before. And the ones on either side of those. And the next and the next. And on and on. Thousands and thousands of plaintive letters and grimly bureaucratic responses—altogether at least 30,000 pages of original material—chronicle cases of forced labor and involuntary servitude in the South decades after the end of the Civil War.

“i have a little girl that has been kidnapped from me … and i cant get her out,” wrote Reverend L. R. Farmer, pastor of a black Baptist church in Morganton, North Carolina. “i want ask you is it law for people to whip (col) people and keep them and not allow them to leave without a pass.”

A farmer near Pine Apple, Alabama, named J. R. Adams, writing of terrible abuses by the dominant landowning family in the county, was one of the astonishingly few white southerners who also complained to the Department of Justice. “They have held negroes … for years,” Adams wrote. “It is a very rare thing that a negro escapes.”

A similar body of material rests in the files of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the one institution that undertook any sustained effort to address at least the most terrible cases. Dwarfing everything at those repositories are the still largely unexamined collections of local records in courthouses across the South. In dank basements, abandoned buildings, and local archives, seemingly endless numbers of files contain hundreds of thousands of handwritten entries documenting in monotonous granularity the details of an immense, metastasizing horror that stretched well into the twentieth century.

By the first years after 1900, tens of thousands of African American men and boys, along with a smaller number of women, had been sold by southern state governments. An exponentially larger number, of whom surviving records are painfully incomplete, had been forced into labor through county and local courts, backwoods justices of the peace, and outright kidnapping and trafficking. The total number of those re-enslaved in the seventy-five years between the end of the Civil War and the beginning of World War II can’t be precisely determined, but based on the records that do survive, we can safely say it happened to hundreds of thousands. How many more African Americans circumscribed their lives in dramatic ways, or abandoned all to flee the South entirely, to avoid that fate or mob violence? It is impossible to know. Millions. Generations.

This is not an easy story for Americans to receive, much less accept. The idea that not just civil rights but basic freedom itself was denied to an enormous population of African Americans until the middle of the twentieth century fits nowhere in the triumphalist, steady-progress, greatest-generations accounts we prefer for our national narrative. That the thrilling events depicted in Steven Spielberg’s recent film Lincoln—the heroic, frenzied campaign by Abraham Lincoln leading to passage of the Thirteenth Amendment abolishing slavery—were in fact later trumped not just by discrimination and segregation but by the resurrection of a full-blown derivative of slavery itself.

This story of re-enslavement is irrefutably true, however. Indeed, even as Spielberg’s film conveys the euphoria felt by African Americans and all opposed to slavery upon passage of the amendment in 1865, it also unintentionally foreshadows the demise of that brighter future. On the night of the amendment’s passage in the film, the African American housekeeper and, as presented in the film, secret lover of the abolitionist Congressman Thaddeus Stevens, played by the actress S. Epatha Merkerson, reads the amendment aloud. First, the sweeping banishment of slavery. And then, an often overlooked but powerful prepositional phrase: “except as a punishment for crime.”

It began with Reconstruction. Faced with empty government coffers, a paralyzing intellectual inability to contemplate equitable labor arrangements with former chattel, profound resentment against the emancipated freedmen, and a desperate economic need to force black workers back into the fields, white landowners and government officials began using the South’s criminal courts to compel African Americans back into slavery.

In the first years after the Civil War, even as former slaves optimistically swarmed into new schools and lined up at courthouses at every whisper of a hope of economic independence, the Southern states began enacting an array of interlocking laws that would make all African Americans criminals, regardless of their conduct, and thereby making it legal to force them into chain gangs, labor camps, and other forms of involuntarily servitude. By the end of 1865, every Southern state except Arkansas and Tennessee had passed laws outlawing vagrancy and defining it so vaguely that virtually any freed slave not under the protection of a white man could be arrested for the crime. An 1865 Mississippi statute required black workers to enter into labor contracts with white farmers by January 1 of every year or risk arrest. Four other states legislated that African Americans could not legally be hired for work without a discharge paper from their previous employer—effectively preventing them from leaving the plantation of the white man they worked for.

After the return of nearly complete white political control in 1877, the passage of those laws accelerated. Some, particularly those that explicitly said they applied only to African Americans, were struck down in court appeals or through federal interventions, but new statutes embracing the same strictures on black life quickly replaced them. Most of the new laws were written as if they applied to everyone, but in reality they were overwhelmingly enforced only against African Americans.

In the 1880s, Alabama, North Carolina, and Florida passed laws making it a crime for a black man to change employers without permission. It was a crime for a black man to speak loudly in the company of a white woman, a crime to have a gun in his pocket, and a crime to sell the proceeds of his farm to anyone other than the man he rented land from. It was a crime to walk beside a railroad line, a crime to fail to yield a sidewalk to white people, a crime to sit among whites on a train, and it was most certainly a crime to engage in sexual relations with—or, God forbid, to show true love and affection for—a white girl.

And that’s how it happened. Within a few years of the passage of these laws, tens of thousands of black men and boys, and a smaller number of black women, were being arrested and sold into forced labor camps by state officials, local judges, and sheriffs. During this time, some actual criminals were sold into slavery, and a small percentage of them were white. But the vast majority were black men accused of trivial or trumped-up crimes. Compelling evidence indicates that huge numbers had in fact committed no offense whatsoever. As the system grew, countless white farmers and businessmen jostled to “lease” as many black “criminals” as they could. Soon, huge numbers of other African Americans were simply being kidnapped and sold into slavery.

The forced labor camps they found themselves in were islands of squalor and brutality. Thousands died of disease, malnourishment, and abuse. Mortality rates in some years exceeded 40 percent. At the same time, this new slavery trade generated millions of dollars for state and local governments—for many years it was the single largest source of income for the state of Alabama. As these laws and practices expanded across the South, they became the primary means to terrorize African Americans, and to coerce them into going along with other exploitative labor arrangements, like sharecropping, that are more familiar to twenty-first-century Americans.

This was the terrifying trap into which Carrie Kinsey’s young brother had been drawn. After a trip through the counties near Kinsey’s home, W. E. B. Du Bois, who was then teaching at Atlanta’s Morehouse College, described in 1905 one such convict farm. “It is a depressing place—bare, unshaded, with no charm of past association, only a memory of forced human toil—now, then, and before the war,” he wrote. He described black farmworkers who never saw wages because charges for rent and food always exceeded any compensation. “A dismal place it still remains, with rows of ugly huts filled with surly ignorant tenants,” Du Bois wrote. “And now and then it blazes forth in veiled but hot anger.”

Du Bois could easily have been describing Kinderlou, where Kinsey’s brother was taken. Encompassing 22,000 acres, it was an enterprise that dwarfed any antebellum definition of the word “plantation.” Owned by state Representative Edward McRee and his brothers, Kinderlou was an unparalleled center of economic and political power in Georgia. By 1900, the siblings had inherited the enterprise from their father, a noted Confederate officer named George McRee. Each lived in a lavish mansion within a square mile of the center of the plantation, basking in the subtropical warmth of the Gulf Coast.

Between them, an empire bustled with enslaved laborers. Consuming the bulk of an entire county, Kinderlou included thousands of acres of lushly fertile sandy loam, and thousands more of dense pine and hardwood. On a private spur of the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad thrust into the center of the plantation, dozens of boxcars waited at all times for the hundreds of thousands of bushels of tomatoes, watermelons, cantaloupes, corn, tobacco, and cotton. The McRees owned their own cotton gins, compresses to make bales, and warehouses to store enormous quantities of lint. A five-horsepower steam engine ground the plantation’s sugarcane to make syrup. Five eighty-foot-long barns were built to cure tobacco, and a factory produced thousands of pallets, wooden crates, and baskets for shipping produce. Deep in the forests, McRee turpentine camps collected rosin for their naval stores distillery.

Initially, the McRees hired only free black labor, but beginning in the 1890s they routinely leased a hundred or more convicts from the state of Georgia to perform the grueling work of clearing land, removing stumps, ditching fields, and constructing roads. Other prisoners hoed, plowed, and weeded the crops. Over the course of fifteen years, thousands of men and women were forced to Kinderlou and held in stockades under the watch of armed guards. After the turn of the century, the brothers began to arrange for even more forced laborers through the sheriffs of nearby counties in Georgia and Florida—fueling what eventually grew into a sprawling traffic in humans.

A black worker in 1904 described to a journalist how he arrived at the farm at age ten as a free laborer. A few years later, he attempted to leave to work at another plantation. Before sundown on the day of his departure, one of the McRees and “some kind of law officer” tracked him down. The new employer apologized to the McRees for hiring the young worker, saying he would never have done so if he had known “this nigger was bound out to you.”

“So I was carried back to the Captain’s,” the man said later. “That night he made me strip off my clothing down to my waist, had me tied to a tree in his backyard, ordered his foreman to gave me thirty lashes with a buggy whip across my bare back, and stood by until it was done.”

When his labor contract finally expired after a decade, the man was told he could leave Kinderlou, so long as he could pay his accumulated debt at the plantation commissary—$165, the rough equivalent of two years’ labor for a free farmer. Unable to do so, of course, he was compelled to sign a contract promising to work on the farm until the debt was paid, but now as a convict.

He and other “prison laborers” slept each night in the same clothes they wore in the fields, on rotting mattresses infested with pests. Many were chained to their beds. Food was crude and minimal. The disobedient were tied to a log lying on their backs, while a guard spanked their bare feet with a plank of wood. After a slave was untied, if he could not return to work on his blistered feet, he was strapped to the log again, this time facedown, and lashed with a leather whip. Women prisoners were held across a barrel and whipped on their bare bottoms.

In the summer of 1903, the assistant U.S. attorney in Macon, Georgia, began a brief investigation into Kinderlou’s army of black laborers held against their will. He discovered that the brothers had arrangements with sheriffs and other officers in at least six other Georgia counties. These law enforcement officials would seize blacks on the grounds that they were “committing crimes,” often specious and sometimes altogether made up, and then sell them to the McRees and other businessmen, without ever going through the regular processes of the criminal courts. When the McRees learned of the investigation, they hastily freed the workers being held involuntarily. At least forty fled immediately.

James Robinson, the brother of Carrie Kinsey, may have been one of them, though federal officials never connected her allegations to the Kinderlou investigation. Even if Kinsey’s brother’s case had been investigated, her letter misspelled the name of the plantation.

In November 1903, a grand jury indicted the McRee brothers on thirteen specific counts of holding African American men and women illegally. Many of those enslaved had never been charged or tried in any fashion. Several public officials were indicted for conspiring to buy and sell blacks arrested on trivial or fabricated charges and then turning them over to the McRees. Sheriff Thomas J. McClellan, resorting to an audacious legal defense employed repeatedly in the handful of slavery cases brought by federal officials in the early twentieth century, argued that since no federal law specifically made slavery a crime, he could not be guilty of violating it. In effect, he claimed slavery was not illegal in the United States.

A member of the U.S. Congress submitted a legal brief in support of the sheriff, and prominent state officials sat at the defendants’ table during a hearing on a challenge to their charges. Across Georgia, operators of lumber camps, where thousands of other men were being held under similarly dubious circumstances, watched the proceedings closely. Appearing with his brothers before a Savannah courtroom, Edward McRee assured the judge that while his family had held many African Americans in the four decades since slavery’s abolition, they had never intended to enslave anyone or break the law. “Though we are probably technically guilty we did not know it,” he told the court. “This custom has been [in] existence ever since the war.… We never knew that we were doing anything wrong.”

The judge, hoping to avoid inflaming the anger of local whites, dispensed symbolic punishments. The McRees were allowed to plead guilty and pay a token fine of $1,000. In the wake of that trial and other failed prosecutions in the first years of the century, the U.S. Department of Justice turned a blind eye to such practices for the next forty years. Only the advent of World War II, a declining need for low-skill laborers, and a new era of federal prosecution would finally bring a true end to American slavery.

More than 100 years after Carrie wrote her letter, I received an unexpected call from a man who identified himself as Bernard Kinsey. He believed he was one of Carrie’s cousins.

Her letter had haunted me through years of research for the book I wrote on re-enslavement. What those few lines conveyed—the seizure of a teenage boy and his sale to a powerful businessman, the abject refusal of authorities to assist her, the brutalization of thousands of other blacks on the same plantation, the heroism of Carrie in seeking the aid of President Roosevelt, and, finally, the futility of her letter—captured the entire epic tragedy of black life in the rural South in the time between the Civil War and World War II. Even to this day, I find myself turning back to her story, resifting census records and cemetery records, looking for the fate of her brother. Did he escape? Did he die at Kinderlou? The answer still eludes me.

Bernard Kinsey represented the counter story. He told me that the Kinsey family fled to Florida not long after the McRee trial of 1903. Bernard’s father opened one grocery store. Then more. Bernard graduated from Florida A&M University in 1967, and a few years later he became one of the first black employees of Xerox Corp. Twenty years later, he retired as a senior executive, one of more than 10,000 African Americans at the company. He then became a major civic leader in Los Angeles, a successful entrepreneur and philanthropist, and one of the leading collectors of African American art and artifacts in the U.S.

Here was the valiance of African Americans who persevered against immeasurable odds. Here was the miracle that American society survived its sweeping betrayal of its own values, its collective dishonoring and debasement of Lincoln’s achievement, the euphoric crowds of 1865 and all those who had died in the Civil War. Ultimately, it is only in a full revelation of all three narratives—of Lincoln and the Thirteenth Amendment, of re-enslavement and the failure of American character, and of the slow ongoing resurrection of our values through the struggle of citizens such as Bernard Kinsey—that we can begin to understand the progress we have made, and the progress we have yet to achieve.

A few weeks after the publication of my book, the great-great-granddaughter of a white industrialist and enslaver of thousands in Atlanta wrote me to describe her pain at discovering a personal connection to these events—and the importance of not looking away from them. “We did not know of any of this before,” she wrote. “But I believe that the ghosts of slavery and racism and the terrorism inflicted within our own country must not be hidden away but brought out into the open.… Without the whole truth, we live only in illusions.”


Links:
[1] http://www.alternet.org/authors/douglas-blackmon
[2] http://www.alternet.org/tags/slavery
[3] http://www.alternet.org/tags/labor-0
[4] http://www.alternet.org/tags/world-war-ii
[5] http://www.alternet.org/%2Bnew_src%2B

The Story of Our Enslavement


For those of you that have followed my writings for the past 7 years on my blog, theUndergroundInvestor, you are well aware that I have been advocating conversion of the majority of fiat currency savings into physical gold and physical silver as a means of combating the system of financial enslavement that the bankers have tried to impose upon the people in every country around the world. The bankers are now entering the second phase of their enslavement through the imposition of austerity measures on people that can least afford this imposition. Though we, at SmartKnowledgeU, have been advocating the purchase of physical gold and physical silver since the mid-2000s as a means of destroying the monetary slavery system of the global bankers, very few of those that have read my arguments still understand why this is a viable approach to gaining freedom from the control of bankers. Thus, I have often thought about alternate ways to explain my arguments that may be easier for the masses in general to digest and grasp. At times, I have even provided short discourses that only deal with psychological enslavement in an attempt to free people’s minds from Central Banking propaganda that continues to enslave them (see my videos about ideological subversion below).

How Ideological Subversion Enables Financial Fraud, Part I

How Ideological Subversion Enables Financial Fraud, Part II

How Ideological Subversion Enables Financial Fraud, Part III

This week, I happened to stumble upon a video that I believe may be very helpful in convincing those people that have refused to open their minds to any of the views I have presented over the past 7 years, that they may indeed be engaging in destructive behaviors that are obedient to the very slave masters that they profess to fight. Interestingly enough, many objections to the truth that I’ve disseminated over the past 7 years, and the consequent faulty rationalizations of these objections, are presented and explained in the video below. I have outlined some of the most salient points of the below video, titled “The Story of Your Enslavement” in the numbered list below.

The Six Steps To Achieving Absolute Financial Enslavement of the People


(1) Indoctrinate the young through “government” education. To understand this fully, please visit this link and read Charlotte Iserbyt’s “The Deliberate Dumbing Down of America” before this website is removed. Charlotte Iserbyt was a former Senior Policy Advisor at the US Department of Education turned whistleblower.

(2) Turn citizens against each other through the creation of “livestock” dependent upon their masters. Keep the livestock happy by presenting to them charades like fake illusions of choice in the form of national elections every 4-6 years. Use these fake illusions of choice to foster as much animosity among the livestock as possible. Foster fake concepts of freedom and pride like “nationalism” to divide and conquer. See the second video at the bottom of this page for more explanation.

(3) Get the cows to attack each other whenever anyone brings up the reality of their situation. See point (2) to understand how to turn the livestock against one another. Divide and conquer. Divide and conquer. Divide and conquer. Convince people to bicker amongst each other about inconsequential matters such as fake divisions of polticial parties, loyalty to governments and nations instead of loyalty to morality and truth, and so on and so on. Accomplish this, and it will become unnecessary to spend significant money to control the cows and livestock.

(4) Ensure that the cows that have become dependent upon the stolen largesse of the farmers (Presidents, Prime Ministers, Parliaments, Congress, and at the top, world bankers and Central Bankers) will violently oppose any questioning of the virtue of human ownership. Dupe the intellectual and artistic classes, always and forever dependent upon the farmers, to admonish anyone that demands freedom from ownership, with the mantra: “You will harm your fellow cows!” to shame those that fight for freedom back into the feed line to keep eating their GMO foods and internalizing force-fed propaganda.

(5) Keep the livestock enclosed in the cages and unable to challenge the power of the farmers by shifting the moral responsibility for the destructiveness of the violent system to those that demand real freedom. See points (2) and (3) to understand why the cows will never ever unite to fight the farmers.

(6) Invent continual external threats to ensure that the frightened livestock cling to the protection of their farmers (i.e. the never-ending, poltically and financially, but not morally, motivated War on Drugs and War on Terror) and will continue to oppose any of their fellow cows that demand freedom from the farmers.

If you are one of those people that has never agreed with anything I’ve ever said for the past 7 years about the necessity of owning physical gold and physical silver as a means of attaining freedom from the money masters that control this world, then please watch the below video as I am sure that it will change the minds of some of the people, that up until now, have been unwilling to consider reality.

http://www.theundergroundinvestor.com/2012/11/the-story-of-your-enslavement/#more-2789

Submitted by DP 11/24/12

Here Are Over One Hundred Products Made From Child Or Slave Labor (GRAPHIC)


Note: Please pay attention to legislation being passed in states with Republican majority’s that are attempting to abolish and amend Child Labor laws, in many cases allowing children as young as 6 years old to enter the labor force.  In some cases these laws are being passed in a desperate attempt to recover losses in the labor force when states like Georgia forced immigrant populations to leave the state/country to escape Draconian, often racially based laws passed over the last few years in an effort to blame the “other guy” for the country’s economic woes. Instead of pointing the finger toward Wall Street and the crooks who crashed the economy in a massive grab for wealth by the 1%.

Now children are being forced to pay the price…but, lest we forget how much corporate farmers love those tiny little hands, they’re so beneficial for reaching between the thorny branches to pluck blueberry’s in 95-100 degree heat!!

By Harry Bradford   |  Posted: 05/10/12

It’s hard to believe, but true: Still today, many everyday products from around the globe are the result of child and slave labor, according to a 2011 report from the U.S. Department of Labor.

Now thanks to an infographic from the National Post, we can more clearly see the effects: All together, the infographic counts 130 product-types from 71 countries — each the result of forced labor, child labor or some combination of the two.

Indeed, slave labor still exists within economic powerhouses like India, China and Brazil, for example. It’s not just these two forms of labor that have come under fire lately. China has faced more wide-ranging criticism over its labor practices, especially after reports of poor working conditions and labor law violations at Foxconn, a factory that manufactures electronics for companies such as Apple and Microsoft.

Go here for infographic and video:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/10/worldwide-products-slave-labor_n_1505811.html

Jon Stewarts “Field of Dongs”


The reality of politics couldn’t be like any more like a cartoon than what’s going on with the right wing and the cavalry of loony-toon candidates they’re offering up to America, and of course topping the list is Michelle “Bat-crap-crazy” Bachman. Who’s husband is sucking off the tit of the government some $125,000 a year in government subsidies for his so-called “Christian” clinic that…well, never mind.  I’ll let Jon illustrate the hypocrisy of the Teabag Party to you in a way that will have you rolling on the floor in laughter…this is great!

Field of Dongs

Michele Bachmann gains traction in Iowa even though Marcus Bachmann is an Izod shirt away from being the gay character on “Modern Family.”

http://www.thedailyshow.com/watch/wed-july-13-2011/field-of-dongs

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