Flock of geese ‘bombed’ Disneyland  


© Allen J. Schaben/Los Angeles Times
Disneyland at 60: the “happiest place on Earth,” but by no means the cheapest.

Seventeen people were struck by droppings from a flock of geese who were above a large group of people at Disneyland on Friday night.

Police and firefighters responded to Disneyland about 9 p.m. after a report of about 20 people being hit with “fecal matter,” the Anaheim Police Department said in a tweet. But it was later determined the droppings came from a flock of geese overhead. Eleven adults and six juveniles were struck by the geese droppings.

The Orange County Register reported Disneyland provided a private restroom for the the affected people to clean up and also gave them clean clothes.

No one was injured.

CLICK HERE for Tweets 🙂

 

https://www.sott.net/article/353494-Flock-of-geese-bombed-Disneyland

Polar bear sighted ‘praying’ at the foot of a cross


Note: While this is truly a great photo, to assume the Bear is praying is anthropomorphizing – giving the bear human traits when it was simply curious about an un-natural, man-made structure in it’s environment. Cute story tho, In-joy!

 ‘Dear God, Please send more salmon…’ © Ocean View Photography, Jessica Andrews 
Jessica Andrews was scanning through dozens of photos she took of a polar bear roaming around her backyard when she came across one that stopped her in her tracks.

The large animal was squatting beneath a white cross, its paws together and raised skyward as it looked up in a seemingly reverential pose.

“I didn’t notice it when I was taking them, but when I started to go through to edit them, oh my God, I was like, ‘Holy crap, he’s praying!”‘ the 22-year-old said from her home in Wesleyville, a shoreline community on Newfoundland’s central coast.

“I was amazed, I mean, beyond amazed.”

The slightly grainy photo shows the bear sitting on its haunches on a barren, snow-covered patch of rock as it looks up to the top of the white cross.

Andrews said she heard there was a polar bear on the small island behind her house soon after she arrived home from work at about 5:30 p.m. Wednesday. She grabbed her camera and spotted the bear wandering around some old fishing boxes on the island before it slipped into the water and ventured over to a neighbouring island.

She kept shooting photos and watching the bear with binoculars, insisting that the curious animal was staring back at her. She said the bear then approached the cross, sniffed around the base and then put his paw on it as if to climb up the main beam.

“He stood up and put his paw on the cross and that’s the picture I took,” she said. “It was almost like he was staring right at me.”

Andrews, who had never seen a polar bear before, said it’s not uncommon for the animals to visit the area. She said the animal meandered around the islands and rolled in the snow before disappearing from view Wednesday evening.

“It looked like he was having so much fun and it made me happy!” she said, adding that she took about 200 photos of the bear.

Police have issued a warning to people in the area to stay away from the bear.

https://www.sott.net/article/346888-Polar-bear-sighted-praying-at-the-foot-of-a-cross

Elephant tramples its owner to death in Cambodia


Note: Incidents with Elephant’s raging against humans have been on the rise in recent years. My feeling is that the Elephant Kingdom is reaching it’s tolerance limit as a hunted, abused and enslaved species of highly sentient BEings.  Blessings, {~A~]

Representative image

An elephant has trampled its owner to death in Cambodia after tourists begged for the animal to be released from its shackles so they could get a better photo with it.

The 60-year-old bull elephant, called Atork, had his chains released so a group of tourists visiting eastern Cambodia could have their photos taken with it in a more natural environment.

But shortly afterwards, the unattended elephant wandered off into the jungle, away from the village where it was being kept.

The elephant’s owner, 47-year-old Choeung Team, hurried after the animal and into the jungle where villagers found his trampled body next to the animal.

They had become concerned that Mr Choeung had not returned and started started a search.

Although the incident is being investigated the owner’s nephew, Saroeun Naro insisted: ‘Atork used his trunk to beat him and trampled on him.’

He told the Phnom Penh Post that a group of tourists whose nationalities have not been revealed asked Mr Choeung to release the elephant’s shackles so they could take photos of themselves with the animal.

Later, while the group was getting ready for lunch, Atork walked away, with Mr Choeung heading off into the jungle to look for him shortly afterwards.

‘I don’t know what the problem with Atork was,’ said the guide’s nephew.

Maybe he needed a female elephant or he was angry with my uncle.’

Local police officer Norng Chanthea told the paper that the elephant was among others regularly used to transport tourists in the area to show them the ethnic minority’s way of life.

‘The owner was killed by his elephant when it was in rut,’ said Mr Norng, referring a natural hormonal surge also known as musth.

District chief Long Vibol told the paper that villagers had used six elephants over recent years to show tourists around a typical ethnic village.

Ms Jemma Bullock, an official with the Elephant Livelihood Initiative Environment, told the Cambodia Daily that Atork had been out on a tour with two other elephants and a group of tourists earlier that day.

Today, the elephant was still on the loose.

Another senior police officer, Touch Yun, said villagers would remain concerned about their safety until the elephant could be caught.

Just last September 55-year-old Pop Sreang was also trampled to death in another district when he tried to recapture an elephant after it had escaped.

Minnesota, Wisconsin and Wyoming have decided to eradicate wolves


Note: The only thing that will prevent this crime against the environment is public outrage, it’s time to SHAME your local Senator. Flood their offices with calls and PLEASE SHARE this information before it’s too late for wolves in Minnesota, Wisconsin and Wyoming. Mahalo

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 Wolf, wolves, Yellowstone, hunt, hunting

“War on Wolves Act” Senators from Midwest and Wyoming introduce bill to strip protections from endangered gray wolves

Senators from Minnesota, Wisconsin and Wyoming yesterday introduced the “War on Wolves Act,” a companion bill to legislation introduced last week in the House that would strip federal protections from wolves and allow trophy hunting and trapping of the species in four states.

If the legislation passes both chambers and gets signed by the president, it would hand the fate of wolves in Minnesota, Michigan, Wisconsin and Wyoming over to states whose management wolf plans two federal courts ruled inadequate to securing the species at legally required population levels in absence of Endangered Species Act protections.

In Wyoming, this would allow the state to resume a hostile management program that allowed for unlimited shoot-on-sight killing of wolves across 85 percent of the state. The legislation would further strip citizens of the right to challenge these lethal programs in court. The appeals process of two federal court decisions that restored federal protections to wolves in those four states are still underway. Decisions on those cases are expected any day.

The following is a statement from Marjorie Mulhall, Senior Legislative Counsel at Earthjustice:

“A new congress has resurfaced an old vendetta against imperiled wolves. If this legislation is signed into law, wolves in Wyoming will be subjected to unregulated killing across the vast majority of the state, and even on the borders of Yellowstone National Park numerous legal loopholes will authorize widespread wolf killing
.

Americans widely hailed the return of wolves to the Northern Rockies two decades ago as a triumph of the Endangered Species Act, but now this ‘War on Wolves Act’ would allow for the same unregulated killing that nearly wiped out the species in the first place.
Politicians should not meddle in the science-based listing status of a particular species at any stage, but now is an especially bad time as these cases are still playing out in the courts. We urge those who support the protection of wolves to call their senators and representatives and tell them to vote down this lethal legislation.”

Source

Florida recruits ‘snake hunters’ in failing war against the Burmese python


Jenny Staletovich
Miami Herald
Wed, 08 Mar 2017 18:28 UTC

© JENNY STALETOVICH
Wildlife officers (left to right) James Bales, Sergio Najera, and Alexis Del Los Santos captured a 15-foot female Burmese python on Monday. The female was breeding with four other males — scientists call it a breeding ball — when the officers found her. They shot the female and two of the males. The other two escaped.

South Florida water managers may amp up the state’s failing war against the Burmese python with a new weapon: a paid python posse.

On Thursday, the South Florida Water Management District will consider a proposal to hire hunters, paying them by the hour, plus a bonus for every snake killed, as part of a two-month, $175,000 pilot project. Hunters would patrol only district land in Miami-Dade County, which includes the vast water conservation area where remote tree islands offer hiding places perfectly suited for the well-camouflaged snakes.

The district declined to provide more details until after the presentation is made to the governing board.

Controlling the pythons has vexed biologists and wildlife officers who have been outgunned by the slithery invaders, which can lay clutches of up to 50 eggs at a time. The snakes started turning up in the marshes, either dumped by unhappy owners or escapees from breeding facilities, in the 1980s, and by about 2000 were firmly established. In September, state wildlife officers confirmed that pythons had also spread to the Keys after they found hatchlings for the first time.

Over the years, biologists have tested a variety of strategies to contain the snakes, including releasing females outfitted with radio trackers to act as ‘Judas’ snakes, snake-sniffing dogs and an iPhone app that lets people immediately report a snake sighting. This past year, the state hired a pair of Irula tribesmen, whose ancestors helped hunt pythons to extinction in India, to track down snakes. And, while it failed to significantly reduce the number of snakes and was largely meant to enlighten the public, the state’s Python Challenge drew the most attention, with headlines around the world.

The district also happens to employ one of the state’s most prolific snake slayers, Bob Hill, who has killed hundreds of pythons since 2004.

Paying hunters to rid the conservation area of snakes is something that the Miccosukee Tribe, which has a perpetual lease on the land and uses the area for hunting and other cultural purposes, has long sought.

“The only way we are going to solve this problem is with the public help. Of course there will need to be strict controls on access. But I think it’s a great idea,” Truman Duncan, the tribe’s water resources director, wrote in an email. “Our Wildlife Officers only patrol Tribal lands. That leaves the majority of the Everglades with very little protection.”

In January, the tribe’s research coordinator surprised area scientists by saying the tribe was banning all research on its land because the tribe considered the snakes sacred. He told the Miami Herald that a change in leadership led to the decision. But last week, during a meeting of a district advisory committee, Duncan said the claim was untrue and that the coordinator had been let go.

“They are not sacred. The instructions are we are to kill them, not study them,” he said.

The tribe, Duncan said, will now only allow research on its land that does not require releasing snakes. In the last month, tribal wildlife officers have killed as many 10 snakes, including a 15-foot female discovered Monday wrapped in a ‘mating ball’ with four males. Officers killed the female and two of the males, but the other two escaped.

“They’re breeding, that’s the problem,” Duncan said at the meeting. “So kill them, don’t study them.”

https://sott.net/en344683

 

Esoteric Crows and Mystical Ravens


Although crows and ravens are part of the same family called Corvus, they’re not exactly the same bird. Typically, ravens are quite a bit bigger than crows, and they tend to be a bit shaggier looking. Both crows and ravens have appeared in a number of different mythologies throughout the ages. In some cases these black-feathered birds are considered an omen of bad tidings, but in others they may represent a message from the Divine.

In Celtic mythology, the warrior goddess known as the Morrighan is often seen accompanied by a group of birds, or appears in the form of a crow or raven. The Native Americans usually, but not always, considered the raven as a trickster, much like Coyote, and in the legends causes mischief and are seen as a symbol of transformation. Some tribes knew the raven as a stealer of souls.

Eagles Destroy Corporate Drones, Cost Mining Company More Than $100,000


Drones owned by one of the world’s largest gold mining companies are being destroyed by native eagles, costing the company thousands of dollars.

wedgieeagle

Mining is one of the most destructive forces currently on the face of the planet. Mines, since the Industrial Era, have poisoned the environment and its workers alike. Gold mining is particularly destructive as its waste carries mercury and cyanide, which are typically used to extract gold from rock. These potent neurotoxins persist in the environment, poisoning the soil, and contaminate water supplies permanently. Gold mining also releases hundreds of tons of elemental mercury into the air annually. In addition, this type of mining is considered particularly destructive because of its wastefulness – over 20 tons of rock and soil must be “treated” and then dislodged to produce enough gold for a single ring. Recently, in the US, the toxic consequences of gold mining were on full display when the Environmental Protection Agency’s incompetence in cleaning out an abandoned gold mine turned the Animas river orange after heavy metal-laden mining waste drained into the river. Before this tragic accident, the EPA had reported that 40% of Western US watersheds had been permanently contaminated by mining.

camodrone

Now that gold mining is not as common as it once was in the US, many other countries have been exploited by gold mining firms in its absence. One of these countries is Australia. Mining in Australia is a major industry with gold mining in Western Australia alone generating over $10 billion every year. However, some of the gold mines there have been experiencing a costly and unexpected problem as nature has apparently decided to fight back against its incursions. Drones that are used to survey the territory around gold mines are being destroyed by native wedge-tailed eagles. Rick Steven, a mine surveyor in the region, said that he had lost nine of his Trimble UX5 drones to eagles, which he labeled “the natural enemy” of drones. After the attacks began, Steven camouflaged his drones as baby eagles. However, the ruse only worked temporarily as 50 flights later the eagles realized the disguised drones were not what they seemed. Each of these drones costs an impressive $20,000, meaning that gold mining companies are losing money fast thanks to the eagles’ intervention. One of these companies, Gold Fields, has already lost over $100,000.

This isn’t the first case of animals fighting back against the degradation of the environment in recent months. Less than a month ago, a herd of wild buffalo appeared out of nowhere in a seeming show of support to the Native Americans and their allies protesting the Dakota Access pipeline. The buffalo, who are considered sacred by the Sioux tribe, appeared by the thousands in a stampede that interrupted a confrontation between protestors and police. After the event, many speculated that the buffalo had appeared to show their solidarity with the protestors and indicated that nature was fighting back against exploitative corporate practices. Hopefully, these acts of defiance from the natural world will inspire people to follow their lead in taking a stand against the corporations destroying the planet.

What are your thoughts? Please comment below and share this news!


This article (Eagles Destroy Corporate Drones, Cost Mining Company More Than $100,000) is free and open source. You have permission to republish this article under a Creative Commons license with attribution to the author and TrueActivist.com

How to Tell a Raven From a Crow


These black birds may look similar in some ways, but several distinctive traits help set them apart.

This story comes to you through a partnership between Audubon and BirdNote, a show that airs daily on public radio stations nationwide.

Go here to hear the podcast

You’re outside, enjoying a sunny day when a shadow at your feet causes you to look up.  A large, black bird flies over and lands in a nearby tree. You wonder: is that a crow or a raven?

These two species, Common Ravens and American Crows, overlap widely throughout North America, and they look quite similar. But with a bit of practice, you can tell them apart.

You probably know that ravens are larger, the size of a Red-tailed Hawk. Ravens often travel in pairs, while crows are seen in larger groups. Also, watch the bird’s tail as it flies overhead. The crow’s tail feathers are basically the same length, so when the bird spreads its tail, it opens like a fan. Ravens, however, have longer middle feathers in their tails, so their tail appears wedge-shaped when open.

Listen closely to the birds’ calls. Crows give a cawing sound. But ravens produce a lower croaking sound.

We’re back looking up at that tree. Now can you tell? Is this an American Crow or a Common Raven?

That’s a raven. The bird calls you hear on BirdNote come from the Macaulay Library at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. To hear them again, begin with a visit to our website, BirdNote.org. I’m Michael Stein.

American Crow. Photo: Brian Kushner

Adapted by Dennis Paulson from a script written by Frances Wood.
Calls provided by The Macaulay Library of Natural Sounds at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, New York. Ambient track American Raven recorded by R.S. Little, American Crow recorded by G.A. Keller.
Forest ambient and featured raven recorded by C. Peterson
Producer: John Kessler
Executive Producer: Chris Peterson
© 2012 Tune In to Nature.org     September 2012     Narrator: Michael Stein

 

http://www.audubon.org/news/how-tell-raven-crow

 

 

Court Stops U.S. Fish & Wildlife from Killing Wild Red Wolves


The U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of North Carolina today issued a preliminary injunction that orders the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to stop capturing and killing of the rapidly dwindling population of wild red wolves.

“This is a great day for red wolves and for anyone who loves nature in eastern North Carolina,” said Sierra Weaver, senior attorney for the Southern Environmental Law Center. “The court was clear that it’s the Fish and Wildlife Service’s job to conserve this endangered species, not drive it to extinction. The agency cannot simply abandon that responsibility.”

The groups brought the federal agency to court for its failure to protect the world’s only wild population of red wolves—previously estimated to be more than 100 animals.

A strong majority of North Carolinians support the effort to recover the native red wolf, according to a new poll conducted by Tulchin Research. The new poll revealed that 73 percent of North Carolinians said they support red wolf recovery.

“We are pleased the court recognized that allowing the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service to issue lethal and non-lethal permits for the removal of red wolves from the wild, was a pathway to extinction, not recovery,” said Kim Wheeler, executive director, Red Wolf Coalition.

“It is reassuring that the court recognized the importance of fostering the recovery of this endangered species.”
 Source

Victory for Red Wolves!

Native American tribes in Canada, U.S. to sign treaty to protect Yellowstone grizzlies


U.S. and Canada-based Native American tribes are expected to sign a treaty on Friday that urges protections be maintained for grizzly bears in and around Yellowstone National Park.

The treaty is the latest sign of growing American Indian activism tied to tribal rights and the environment, and just the third such cross-border agreement in 150 years, tribal members involved said.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service said earlier this year that Yellowstone-area grizzlies had come back from the brink of extinction and it proposed stripping U.S. Endangered Species Act protections from the population of about 700 bears.

The move would open the way for hunting bears that roam outside the park’s borders in Wyoming, Montana and Idaho.

The treaty, expected to be signed by Piikani Nation and other tribes in the western Canadian province of Alberta on Friday, declares support by more than 50 tribes for protecting grizzlies from random killing and preserving their habitat against development.

The planned ceremony comes two days before representatives of other tribes mostly in and around the U.S. Rocky Mountain West are expected to sign the same treaty during a ceremony in Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming.

The Canada-based tribes are signing the measure to show solidarity with tribes based in the United States, as they are all united by cultural and religious ties to grizzlies.

Chief Stanley Grier of the Piikani Nation and representatives from such tribes as the Blackfeet Nation in Montana and the Shoshone-Bannock of eastern Idaho, argue grizzlies are too sacred and culturally important to be killed by hunters.

“There should be no doubt that delisting and trophy hunting the grizzly bear on ancestral tribal and treaty lands threatens irreparable harm to those sites and to tribal sovereignty and religious freedom,” Grier said.

Tribal members also say the U.S. government failed to engage in “meaningful consultation” before decisions were made about delisting grizzlies.

Serena Baker, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, said the agency had sought since 2014 to reach out to about 50 tribes – through letters, phone calls and emails – about Yellowstone grizzlies.

“The service has and is continuing to offer government-to-government consultation with Native American tribes west of the Mississippi,” she said on Thursday.
 Source

Elephant Orphans… Wisdom of the Wild


From ArgoFilm’s “Wisdom of the Wild” comes the moving story of Daphne Sheldrick and her elephant orphanage. This documentary was produced for PBS’ Nature Series.

Join our journey by subscribing to our channel! Our Emmy Award winning films seek to lend a voice to those who cannot speak for themselves.

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Hundreds of crow attacks tracked on new online map: Creator refuses to be ‘run off the street by crows’


Gemma Karstens-Smith, The Canadian Press  06.01.2016

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VANCOUVER — People with ornithophobia have a new tool to fight their fear of birds — a map that tracks crow attacks.

Instructors at Langara College in Vancouver used open-source software to create the online map, which allows anyone with an Internet connection to pinpoint where they were attacked and add details, such as how aggressive the bird was.

Jim O’Leary teaches Geographic Information Systems at the college and says he and his colleague Rick Davidson wanted to show how the course content could be put to use.

O’Leary says he was inspired to start tracking crow attacks after witnessing several in downtown Vancouver last year and thinking that recording them could help better understand the problem.

The birds are particularly aggressive during the spring, when they are protecting their nests.

Hundreds of attacks have been documented on the map since it launched in April, including reports from Victoria and Antigonish, N.S.

O’Leary says he and his colleague didn’t know how popular the map would become.

“I originally envisioned it as being the greater Vancouver area, but crow attacks seem to touch a nerve with people. It seems like many people have a crow story that they want to tell,” he says. “I guess crows are aggressive everywhere.”

Mapping the attacks helps establish where the most aggressive crows are and gives an idea of whether there are any patterns, O’Leary says.

“With all our technology skills, we shouldn’t be run off the street by the crows. So this is our response,” he says. “The first part of a solution is to find out what a problem is.”

So far, there have been dozens of attacks reported in downtown Vancouver, and O’Leary says he believes there are more crows in the area because of the concentration of garbage cans and tall trees.

O’Leary says he isn’t sure whether governments would be interested in the information, but notes that it’s all public and at least it gives people an idea of where the crows are located.

“At the very least, people can vent their frustrations and they can see where the concentrations are,” he says.

It has also taught O’Leary that the birds are more aggressive than he ever imagined. He’s heard reports of crows banding together to dive-bomb a passerby, and of birds targeting dogs and cats.

The map has also sparked interest in Langara’s Geographic Information Systems certificate program, which teaches students how to manage and use geographic data.

O’Leary says seven people signed up for his course within a week of the map gaining notoriety.

http://www.vancouversun.com/News/11959750/story.html

Little Girl Feeds Crows; In Return, They Bring Her Gifts


This amazing story caught my attention, having little girls of my own that love animals and birds, it is always nice to read little stories like these were reciprocity exists between different species on earth. In this case a little girls that feeds crows and the crows show their appreciation by bringing back little tokens. She’s been collecting them.

 

Like many kids her age, 8-year-old Gabi Mann from Seattle has an interesting collection of treasures. A yellow bead, one blue earring, a tiny light bulb, a paperclip and a rusty screw. But unlike many kids her age, Gabi didn’t collect these treasures herself. They were brought to her by crows.

Yes, you read that right. Like Cinderella, Gabi has bird friends that bring her gifts on a regular basis.

It all started quite by accident. As a toddler, Gabi was prone to dropping her food as she walked along. Soon, the crows were keeping an eye on her, and swooping in to pick up the pieces whenever she dropped a morsel. As Gabi got older, she began sharing her school lunch on the way to the bus stop. It didn’t take long before the crows lined the street to greet her bus each day.

 

Then, in 2013, Gabi decided to do more than just share the scraps of her lunch. Each morning, she began filling a birdbath with fresh water, and setting out food — peanuts, dog food and general leftovers — for the birds to eat. It was then that the gifts from the crows started to appear.

Her collection also includes a miniature silver ball, a black button, a faded black piece of foam and a blue Lego piece. She stores the treasures that the crows bring to her in a bead container, with each gift carefully itemized and labeled.

What’s Gabi’s most prized treasure? A pearl-colored heart. Because Gabi says that’s the one that shows just how much they love her.

You can listen to Gabi and hear more about her story on The Bittersweet Life podcast.

 

http://www.offgridquest.com/life-stories/little-girl-feeds-crows-in-return-they-b

Monkeys With Smaller Testicles Scream Louder to Compensate, Study Finds


howler

A new study finds that Howler monkeys scream louder when they have smaller testicles.

The study published yesterday in the journal Current Biology said that howler monkeys with deep roars — used to attract females, deter love rivals and scare off predators — tend to also have smaller testicals and a shortage of sperm compared to their peers.

howlermonkey_02

According to Charles Darwin, writing on how species’ evolutionary choices impact each other in “On the Origin of Species”:

“The whole organism is so tied together that when slight variations in one part occur, and are accumulated through natural selection, other parts become modified.”

howlermonkey_04

Biological anthropologist Jacob Dunn and his team from Cambridge University wanted to see if there was a negative correlation between the size of a howler monkey’s vocal tract and the size of his testicles.

The team used 3D laser scanners to analyze a cup-shaped chamber in the howler monkey’s throat called a hyoid that acts an echo chamber. Dr. Dunn said:

“The results of our acoustic analyses show that howler monkeys produce roars at a similar frequency as tigers, which is far lower than we would have predicted from their body size, yet exactly what would be predicted from measuring their giant vocal folds’ which are three times bigger than in a human.”

howlermonkey_03

Howler monkeys can be found in the forests of Central and South America and weigh roughly 15 pounds, but their growl can reach 128 decibels, which is equivalent to the roar of a tiger.

The researchers speculate that this is because howler monkeys want to give the impression that they are bigger than they actually are. Dr. Dunn proposed:

“It may be that investment in developing a large vocal organ and roaring is so costly that there is simply not enough energy left to invest in testes.

“Alternatively, using a large vocal organ for roaring may be so effective at deterring rival males that there is no need to invest in large testes.”

howlermonkey_01

The study furthered that males with bigger hyoids had smaller testicles and lived in smaller social groups where there was a single male dominating a number of females.

Male howler monkeys with bigger testes and smaller hyoids most likely lived in bigger social groups and had to share partners. Dunn said:

“In evolutionary terms, all males strive to have as many offspring as they can, but when it comes to reproduction you can’t have everything.”

 

http://nextshark.com/howler-monkey-testicles-study/

Christian ‘Prophet’ Loses His Buttocks to a Hungry Lion While Trying to Prove God Would Save Him


“I do not know what came over me. I thought the Lord wanted to use me to show his power over animals.”

Photo Credit: e2dan/Shutterstock

Alec Ndiwane thought he was filled with the Holy Spirit when he decided to “challenge” lions at the Kruger National Park.

The Zion Christian Church Prophet was at the park with his fellow church members when, according to GhanaWeb, he went into a trance and began speaking in tongues. The group approached the pride of lions while they munched happily on an antelope, but that’s when Ndiwane ran toward the lions.

Out To Africa lists humans as the major predator to lions, so it’s no surprise that the lions took on the challenge. Once he realized what was happening, Ndiwane made an about-face and immediately ran away. Unfortunately, lions are fast and fierce animals and when one of the lions snapped her paws on him, Ndiwane sustained injuries to his buttocks.

The ranger fired his gun into the air to scare the lions off and rushed the prophet to the hospital, where he underwent emergency surgery to ensure he didn’t lose most of his buttocks.

“I do not know what came over me,” Ndiwane confessed. “I thought the Lord wanted to use me to show his power over animals. Is it not we were given dominion over all creatures of the earth.” He was eventually stitched up and discharged after spending the night in hospital.

http://www.alternet.org/belief/christian-prophet-loses-his-buttocks-hungry-lion-while-trying-prove-god-would-save-him?akid=14055.321917.xYyI8u&rd=1&src=newsletter1052396&t=16

 

Ed Note: In one statement:

“I thought the Lord wanted to use me to show his power over animals. Is it not we were given dominion over all creatures of the earth.”

Ndiwane summed up everything that’s wrong with traditional religion that’s led us to the point of planetary extinction: Instilled belief systems that man is dominant over the Earth, without respect to the free will, well being or spiritual nature of nature’s lifeforms.  This man was lucky to walk-away with minor injury’s to his buttocks, and the appropriate karma for being an ass.

Have a great weekend! Blessings, Annette

Tourist ‘Kills Swan After Pulling It Out Of A Lake For A Selfie’


Note: This extremely disturbing example of the deteriorating state of the human condition shows just how narcissistic and self-absorbed a great percentage of the population still are at in their spiritual development. While many are waking-up and reconnecting with nature, the majority appear to be spiraling into the abyss with little hope at a chance for redemption…{face palm, shake head}
This woman needs to be located and charged with cruelty to animals, she’s nothing less than a criminal exhibiting psychopathic behavior and should be publicly treated as such to send a message to others of like mind.
Blessings, Annette
image

Another day, and yet another depressing example of humans killing animals in the pursuit of a selfie.

This time, it was a swan in Macedonia that met its unfortunate end after being dragged up from a lake by a tourist – before being left to die on a beach.

Photos of the incident show a woman dragging the bird by its wing before dragging it onto the shore of Macedonia’s Lake Ohrid.

View gallery

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image

After taking the photo, she then reportedly abandoned the animal.

Macedonia Online reports that the swan remained ‘motionless after the encounter.’

It comes only a month after a dolphin allegedly died in Argentina after tourists pulled it from the water to take photographs – although a photographer has since refuted this claim.

A similar incident also reportedly saw peacocks being killed at a zoo in China, after tourists grabbed the exotically-feathered birds for the photos

It’s thought that peacocks can suffer heart attacks when they are exposed to large shocks – and it’s this that caused the sorry demise of the birds.

All in the name of just a few likes, too.

 

http://news.yahoo.com/woman-kills-swan-after-pulling-it-from-lake-for-a-094804381.html?nf=1

Awaken Academy Guest Series: Anna Breytenbach, Animal Communicator


http://awakenacademy.org Victoria More (Awaken Academy Mystic) interviews renowned animal communicator Anna Breytenbach in this unique and awe-inspiring call which opens up a whole new world of relationship and connection. Anna shares fascinating stories of her communications with animals and leads a meditation to help others connect with an animal of their choice.

Anna is a professional animal communicator who’s been practicing for 12 years in South Africa, Europe and the USA with both domestic and wild animals.

To hear more Awaken Academy downloads, go to:
http://awakenacademy.org/free-mp3-dow…

Lyrebird: Remarkable crazy Bird call ! [ MUST WATCH ]


Creativity in noises, creativity in natures consciousness.

If you haven’t heard the Lyrebird before, hear its bizzare yet wonderful noises which makes you think, how alien and strange the natural world can really be.

” A lyrebird is either of two species of ground-dwelling Australian birds, that form the genus, Menura, and the family Menuridae. They are most notable for their superb ability to mimic natural and artificial sounds from their environment. As well as their extraordinary mimicking ability, lyrebirds are notable because of the striking beauty of the male bird’s huge tail when it is fanned out in display; and also because of their courtship display. Lyrebirds have unique plumes of neutral-coloured tailfeathers and are among Australia’s best-known native birds.

The lyrebird is capable of imitating almost any sound and they have been recorded mimicking human sounds such as a mill whistle, a cross-cut saw, chainsaws,[9] car engines and car alarms, fire alarms, rifle-shots, camera shutters, dogs barking, crying babies, music, mobile phone ring tones, and even the human voice. However, while the mimicry of human noises is widely reported, the extent to which it happens is exaggerated and the phenomenon is quite unusual.[3]

A lyrebird’s song is one of the more distinctive aspects of its behavioural biology. Lyrebirds sing throughout the year, but the peak of the breeding season, from June to August, is when they sing with the most intensity. During this peak they may sing for four hours of the day, almost half the hours of daylight. The song of the superb lyrebird is a mixture of seven elements of its own song and any number of other mimicked songs and noises. The lyrebird’s syrinx is the most complexly-muscled of the Passerines (songbirds), giving the lyrebird extraordinary ability, unmatched in vocal repertoire and mimicry.

The superb lyrebird’s mimicked calls are learned from the local environment, including from other superb lyrebirds. An instructive example of this is the population of superb lyrebirds in Tasmania, which have retained the calls of species not native to Tasmania in their repertoire, but have also added some local Tasmanian endemic bird noises. It takes young birds about a year to perfect their mimicked repertoire. The female lyrebirds of both species are also mimics, and will sing on occasion but the females do so with less skill than the males.[3] A recording of a superb lyrebird mimicking sounds of an electronic shooting game, workmen and chainsaws was added to the National Film and Sound Archive’s Sounds of Australia registry in 2013.[10] ” – wikipedia.

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